(Closed) We Got a Dog! However…

posted 8 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
1003 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

This doesn’t make you a bad person at ALL.

Is he fixed? How long have you had him? Has he done number two in the house?

What he is doing is sounding like classic marking rather than just peeing. Sorry for all the questions, I just want to get a better idea of the situation.

Post # 5
Member
5670 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

I don’t think it makes you a bad person. Please return the dog as soon as possible say that he still has a chance at getting adopted. Unfortunately what you described sounds like the fun of housebreaking a puppy, it takes a little while until they get it and it requires a lot of consitency. As long as you realize that this may not be the time for you in your life to get a dog, there is nothing wrong with that.

Post # 6
Member
1269 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Is he a shiba inu?  If so I have raised two and can offer some specific advice.  please pm me.  and DONT give up.  They can be the most awesome pals.

Post # 7
Member
5670 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

Also, sometimes people think it is easier getting a dog who is a little bit older instead of a puppy, but with an older dog you now have to break bad habits that have already formed. He may have never been housetrained and for the past year has gone to the bathroom whereever he wanted when he wanted.

Post # 8
Member
1003 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Yeah, even fixed male dogs can “mark.” And since the dog is so so new, he is probably trying to establish his territory. First, I’d probably call the rescue he is from and tell them of the problem and ask them what you should do and any trainers they recommend. Get him signed up for training and just make sure you are consistent with any training you learn.

My aunt and uncle adopted a border collie and she would nervously pee on the floor if anyone would make a sudden move. My uncle took her to classes and she has not done it in 3 months. It really makes the difference.

 

Post # 9
Member
140 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

He might just be marking his territory of being in a new house. I have always been around dogs, from rescuing them, to raising from pups. give him a little more time, and see if it stops, make sure you consistently scold him for bad behavior, and reward him for good. If things don’t work out it would be best to return him to the agency so that both of you can find better matches! Best of Luck!

Post # 10
Member
58 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

We rescued two dogs, a mother and son, who both appeared potty trained.  Turned out only the mom was, and the son was following her lead.  So, whenever he was in a different room than she was, there was an accident.  It took A LOT of time and patience, and honestly it was about 6 months until the accidents completely stopped.  What’s hard with rescues is that even if they’re “Trained”, you don’t know how long it’s been since they’ve been on a regular schedule.

As for the other subject, personally I think 10 hours is a long time in a crate.  Is there anyway you can employ a dog walker to come at lunchtime and let him out?  We do that, and while it costs an arm and a leg, we’re happy knowing that they’re getting out during the day and that they aren’t doing the potty dance until we get home.

It sounds like it may not be the best time for you to have a dog as potty training isn’t something that’s just a weekend thing.  I’d have an honest talk with the rescue group and see if they have any advice.  If you do return him, you may perhaps want to give some sort of donation in his name for additional grooming/training to give him a better chance in his next home. 

Good Luck!

Post # 11
Member
1003 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@tinybride: Yeah I will second that too. If you do end up returning the dog, I strongly recommend making a donation.

Post # 12
Member
1641 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

I have to say that when you take on a dog, you take on a responsibility to at least try your best, and I don’t get the sense that you did. There is no such thing as a perfect dog…or any pet for that matter.

One thing you can try- as soon as the dog starts to pee in the house- the SECOND it starts- yell “NO!” pick him up, and take him outside and let him finish. Praise him up and down! ALL Dogs want is to please their people. When you pick him up, it is very unlikely that he will pee on you. Also, take him to the same spot every time, if you can. Dogs frequently go in the same spot. Have you contacted a trainer? They can also help you figure out why the dog is doing this so you can address the problem based on the cause.

I don’t know the dog’s history, but it could be that he is very nervous/scared/ emotionally scarred and it might take a little time. In the meantime, can you keep him in a confined area when he is in the house? Say, in the kitchen or on tile, within a confined space (you can get fencing at Petco/PEtsmart or whatever that can be used indoors).

Everytime a dog is returned to a shelter, it is more and more likely that it will be put down. I don’t feel that you have given this dog a chance, and that you are possibly not being patient, and you need that with any pet. It sounds to me like you have a good dog that is probably not secure or confident (or it could be something even simpler, like in his past he was not given enough time to pee outside…or maybe he got yelled at for peeing on flowers or something). It is very sad to me that a dog like that would be sent back to a shelter without much effort on your part. It always upsets me to hear that people take on pets but aren’t willing to work with them, as it is so unfair to the animal that now will likely face more trauma by being returned, and possibly death because nobody was willing to do what he needs. Sorry if I sound uncaring but I worked at a shelter and I am sick and tired of the reasons people who should not have pets in the first place, use for sending them to hell (my favorite is “got new furniture, so the dog has to go”). Good grief.

Post # 13
Member
1641 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

I was feeling guilty about what I just wrote, so I went back to re-read some of the thread. I just re-read what you wrote later on. You have only had this dog a week, are you KIDDING me? That is nowhere near enough time for it to get into a routine, or even understand your expectations! It doesn’t matter that it is not a puppy!

Take it outside, wait for it to pee, praise it, and if it starts to pee in the house, yell NO!, immediately take it outside, and praise it.

It takes time to train a dog, and if it was allowed to pee in the house where it was before, it will take even longer. To give it a week and expect perfection..well, I just don’t have the words…

Post # 15
Member
5148 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Dogs have an adjustment period, especially shelter dogs.

As for the peeing in the house, belly-bands can help with the mess while you’re training.

In all honesty: some dogs can be trained not to mark, some can’t. One of my male dogs wears a belly-band any time he’s in the house (with a maxi-pad on it for extra absorbency) because we simply cannot trust him, he pees on everything regardless of how much we’ve worked on training him. My other male dog is a success story though; he’s even intact but doesn’t mark.

Post # 16
Member
383 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

This is a really common problem. As a dog trainer, I know how frustrating it can be when what the shelter tells you is not true. If you don’t think you are being good parents, it isn’t the worst thing to return the dog – but know that it does take time for them to settle into a new home.

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