(Closed) Weight of Invitations

posted 10 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
367 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2008

you’re most likely going to need the extra postage.  i have a 5×7 pocketfold with the invitation panel and then 3 inserts (only the rsvp is a heavy-weight), then there’s the outer envelope as well and mine weight 1.3 ounces, just barely over the 42 cent maximum ๐Ÿ™

Post # 4
Member
1061 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2008

Just so you know, I had 5×7 invites with 3 inserts, an inner and outer envelope, and it cost a fortune to mail (they were letterpressed so I had thick, heavy card stock). The verdict is still out on how much they *really* cost (I got 3 different numbers from 3 different post offices), so I ended up playing it safe and going with the highest number — $1.34.

Post # 5
Member
2293 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2008

Haha – rebecca you make me feel much better.  I had 6.25 x 6.25 pocketfolds with multiple inserts and inner/outer envelopes.  I also got three different guess-timates on the postage from various USPS employees.  The highest was also $1.34, which I guess corresponds to the 2-ounce parcel rate (parcel rather than letter because they were too stiff to go through the machines easily – they certainly weren’t too thick).  We did get an estimate as low as $1.00, but figured for 100 invites the difference was in the noise overall.  And worth it, as every invitation arrived in great shape – as they were handled by hand only every step of the way, since they were parcels!  And I had no crazy arguments about hand-cancelling…

Post # 7
Member
378 posts
Helper bee

I had a 5×7 pocketfold with three inserts and I had to use a .59 stamp. To keep the cost low, don’t use heavy paper! ๐Ÿ™‚ Sounds stupid, but it’s true. And they sell stamps in different values, so your "one stamp" idea would still work.

Post # 8
Member
1061 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2008

@Suzanno — "guesstimate" is the perfect word. For so many rules, it seems strange that I can’t get a consistent answer!

@MsB — we used postcards for the RSVPs, which entitled us to a lower rate (27 cents). You could limit your amount of enclosures (put your accommodations/directions info on your wedding website, for example). JMA’s suggestion of not to use heavy paper, while seemingly obvious, is a great one. And many people are now doing away with an inner envelope.

We used stamps from zazzle.com — they have a number of denominations to choose from, so we didn’t need to use more than 1 stamp, even for $1.34. The post office does have a number of denominations too, but I didn’t want to use the big-horned sheep on my invitations. =)

Post # 10
Member
629 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2005

I sent the USPS a copy of Miss Creampuffs complaint so they’d know how inconsistent they’re being, and this is what I got back…

Dear Angel,

Thank you for contacting us about the problems this person had finding postage prices.

I apologize this occurred. This type of conduct is not acceptable under any circumstances. As with any business, much of our public image depends on the manner in which our employees interact with customers.

To be eligible for mailing at the postage rates for letters, a piece must be:

– Rectangular and have angular (90 degree) corners.
– At least 3-½ inches high x 5 inches long x .007 inch thick
– No more than 6-1/8 inches high x 11-½ inches long x 1/4 inch thick.
– Square letters (such as the popular "musical" greeting cards) are mailable, but they don’t fit well into mail processing equipment. Square mail pieces are subject to the applicable nonmachinable surcharge (an additional $0.17) because their length/width ratio is less than 1.3.

Letters exceeding any of the dimension and/or weight requirements are priced as large envelopes. Delivery Confirmation™ and Signature Confirmation™ services are not available for First Class letters. A nonmachinable letter will be charged a $0.17 nonmachinable surcharge.

The placement of the address on a letter-size mailpiece may render a piece nonmailable or nonmachinable. If the length (the dimension parallel to the address) of a letter-size mailpiece is not at least 5 inches, it is nonmailable. If the height (the dimension perpendicular to the length) of a letter-size mailpiece is not at least 3-1/2 inches, it is non­mailable. For example:

For a letter-size piece that is 4 inches by 6 inches, if the address is parallel to the 4-inch dimension, it is 4 inches long, which is less than the minimum length of 5 inches required. Therefore, this piece is nonmailable. If the aspect ratio (length divided by height) is not within 1.3 to 2.5 (inclusive), the piece is a nonmachinable letter.

You are welcome to estimate postage for your items by using our Postage Rates Calculator at:

<font color=”#003399″>http://postcalc.usps.gov</font&gt;/

1. Select a shape (If you need more information on shapes, click on the question marks.)
2. Input the weight for your item
3. Input the ZIP Codes™
4. Select the mailing service you intend to use
5. Choose any available extra services for the mailing

You can also find more detailed information regarding rates at the following link:

<font color=”#003399″>http://www.usps.com/rates/welcome.htm</font&gt;

Hope this helps. If you need to, print this baby off when you go to visit. And start sending any complaints to the USPS. Hopefully they’ll get the point.

 

Post # 11
Member
2293 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2008

Well…. that is so helpful.  And just FYI, today at lunch I drove to the post office to pay $0.75 postage due on a graduation card for FI’s son – not because it was overweight, but because whatever his aunt put in the envelope with the card was a little lumpy and quite stiff – and so the envelope wouldn’t flex adequately to be put through the machine and was declared a parcel.

Which is why we just went with the highest postage estimate we got – I know people have shopped around from post office to post office to get the lowest answer, but we were told at two different post offices that postage due can be assessed anywhere along the journey of your envelope, so what the mailing post office tells you doesn’t really matter, as the receiving post office can decide the postage is not adequate.  And we really didn’t want to take a chance of our guests having to drive to the post office and pay money to get their invitations.

Post # 12
Member
2293 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2008

What they also don’t quite make clear on the table is that the 42-cent price is for letters UP TO AND INCLUDING one ounce – if you go over one ounce, even by just a little, you pay the two ounce price.  Our finished envelopes were exactly two ounces without stamps – and so we were told the price was actually more than the two ounce price – because the weight of the stamp would make it more than two ounces.  So remember to include the weight of your stamps when you are trying to figure the postage.

Post # 13
Member
76 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: August 2008

I had the invite, RSVP card and return envelope and directions card…I had them weighed at the post office before mailing…I was within the 1 stamp limit…my invites were 5 x 7 but were’t pocketfolds.

Post # 14
Member
267 posts
Helper bee

I also had a 5×7 pocketfold, triple-layered invitation, 3 inserts plus RSVP envelope, with ribbon wrapped around the pocketfold and a triple-layered seal… and I ended up needing $.58 in postage (before the latest rate hike). I used $.60 stamps instead, they were prettier! ๐Ÿ˜‰

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