(Closed) What can one do with "digital negatives?"

posted 5 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
2623 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

A digital negative is simply the original file unaltered, no logs etc. You can just hit print!

Post # 5
Member
2623 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@sienna76:  oops I meant logos. 

Check with your photographer though to be sure. Its what my photogapher called my CD of pics, but there may be something different out there.

Post # 7
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@ThreeMeers:  This is one of the worst terms in wedding photography today.  Unaltered, unedited files (straight out of camera) need work.  Pure and simple.  99% of wedding photographers do not turn over RAW images (RAW is a file format) to their clients.  In my experience digital negative means the edited JPEG image in it’s original file sizes (240-300 dpi).  It’s very very important that you verify with your photographer what their definition of digital negative is if they are using that terminology.  1) Images in RAW file formats are generally not accepted as print ready by labs, and 2) unedited images are flat and ugly.

Post # 8
Member
622 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@continuumphotography:  Interesting. My understanding is that digital negatives are mostly unedited jpg files, with perhaps just very basic adjustments like cropping or color correcting ( sometimes not even that). Many wedding photographers will offer a disc othat’ll of your images that way and then you can choose x number of them to be edited. 

 

Heres a pretty good explanation:

http://www.stacyreeves.com/editing-digital-negatives-2/

 

Post # 9
Member
814 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

I don’t understand why any real photographer would hand over RAW, unedited files. They’d be pretty useless to 90% of people.

Post # 10
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@mariematt:  I know Stacy through various photographer social media, like I know a lot of photographers, and many of us have different levels of editing and retouching that we do to files.  Keep in mind that this article was written 5 years ago.

All of this really means is that if you hire Stacy Reeves (who is an excellent photographer by the way), that when she talks about Digital Negatives that’s what you get.  However we don’t all use the exact same terms, and there is no industry standard.

Some photographers only do very minor adjustments to their RAW files, and save them into JPEG form.  They may do more in depth treatments or retouching to photos that are ordered as prints, are used in blog posts, or make it to the album.  The philosophy makes sense… why spend a lot of labor on a photo that someone may not be interested in buying?

Some of us have different philsophies.  For us all of the files we release are ready for print, and have had a more in depth adjustment.  Maybe we hand over fewer files but they have more done to them, maybe we take longer, who knows.  The point is that we all operate in different ways, and the wedding photographer industry is not regulated so there are few terms that are recognized universally to have the same meaning – and this is one of them that can mean different things to different people.  Stacy Reeves runs a solid business and more photographers could take lessons from her, but just because she uses a term in a certain way it wouldn’t be wise to expect that every photographer uses it in the same way.  

All business models are different.  So be wise and check with your individual photographer to see how they do things.

Post # 11
Member
622 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@continuumphotography:  Right. I agree, just saying that most of the photographers I know use it to describe minimally edited images. I work the same way you do – I just don’t like releasing unedited files or a set of photos with some edited and the rest unedited. 

Post # 12
Member
6051 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

As a photographer, I consider a Digital Negative to be the unedited original RAW file. I would NEVER release that to a client, period. It would be utterly useless to most of my clients who wouldn’t even have the capability to edit a RAW file.

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