What classes to take in preparation for baby?

posted 3 years ago in Pregnancy
  • poll: What classes are worth taking in preparation for baby?
    Breastfeeding : (20 votes)
    29 %
    Infant Care : (13 votes)
    19 %
    Infant CPR/Safety : (19 votes)
    27 %
    Childbirth at hospital : (11 votes)
    16 %
    Childbirth at independent facility : (7 votes)
    10 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    2690 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2012

    For our first, we went to a childbirthing class at the hospital (it was just one class).  I think it was on childbirth and not infant care.  I REALLY wish I had gone to a more in depth class on breastfeeding as I had a really hard time at first with that and wish I had had more info as a 1st time mom.

    Post # 4
    Member
    5745 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: April 2011

    None listed.

    I already know infant CPR & first aid from when I worked at the hospital (yes it does change some every year but the basic instruction is the same). And I think infant care be generally figured out with ease on ones own (I was 19 when I had my son & figured it out fine. lol)

    I prepared for l&d by reading homebirth stories (b/c they were the most successful at having natural births), stayed away from medicated or induced birth stories (although I was well versed on all intervention & their risk vs benefit ratio & how I was okay using them if necessary), and I did all I could to trust my body…. that along with having a likeminded support system & it went much smoother than when I read the Bradley Method book & tried to use that. My #1 thing is if you’re going for a natural birth, skip the hospital class… it’s deflating & just gives insight on the hospital policy that dictates most births.

    As for breastfeeding, finding a local IBCLC & getting an appt soon after delivery is much more beneficial that any class. Get a support system & read up on kellymom.com for accurate, up to date info regarding breastfeeding… something most hospitals do use or implement (ie. the normal output for a newborn baby)… definitely go check out her page! It was vital to our success with breastfeeding!

    The class I’d REALLY suggest taking is a car seat safety class with a CPST!!! Seriously! MOST (upwards of 85-90%) of carseats are not installed properly & a seat not installed properly insn’t keeping your lo safe. Find one in your area for sure!

    Post # 5
    Member
    3633 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: June 2012

    DH and I are taking/have taken:

    – Prepared Childbirth (e.g. breathing techniques, natural v csection, hospital procedures)

    – Baby Savers (e.g. baby first-aid, baby-proofing)

    – Baby Basics (e.g. swaddling, diapering, reading cues)

    – Car Seat Basics (e.g. how to pick one and install)

    – Breastfeeding (e.g. how to, what to expect)

    The car seat one and the breastfeeding one are free. The baby savers and baby basics are $35/each. The childbirth one is $100.

    We are taking all of these from the hospital as it is a highly recommended hospital for women’s and maternity care.

     

    Post # 6
    Member
    1887 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @NJmeetsBX:  Start with the general class offered by your hospital and infant CPR.  If you have a hard time breast feeding, THEN take that class.  While some women have great difficulty breast feeding, many pick it up extremely easily.   There is no need to take the class until you know if you need one.  Women who struggle breastfeeding always recommend it, but don’t assume you will struggle. You may have no trouble at all.

    Post # 7
    Member
    1284 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2011

    @NJmeetsBX:  i found the childbirth classes at our hospital REALLY important to attend, even though I’m aiming for a natural birth. I think it’s really important to know what their policies and beliefs are, so I’m not worrying about what I’ll have to ‘fight’ for or against. For example, I was thrilled to hear that the main midwives at my hospital think you shouldn’t be lying down to birth (I’d worked it up in my head that I’d have to fight for this). And I learnt that their policy is no food during labour, so now I know to sneak in some fruit/bars/snacks just in case I get hungry, coz they won’t provide me with food. Plus we got to meet some of the staff and know our way around the hospital.

    but on top of that we’re also booked in to a Calmbirth course (external provider childbirth course) to get us prepared and skilled up for a natural delivery.

    Post # 8
    Member
    5745 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: April 2011

    @hamikay:  That is true! Our hospitals here are poo so I stay as far away from them as possible! lol

    Post # 9
    Member
    1887 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @hamikay:  Not eating during labor is for your own benefit.  I recommend you thoroughly research the decision to sneak in snacks in reputable peer reviewed medical and nursing journals before making that decision. 

    Post # 11
    Member
    1887 posts
    Buzzing bee

    Edited because I went too far off topic.  Sorry, OP!

    Post # 12
    Member
    3677 posts
    Sugar bee

    @FLBlonde93:  Most other countries don’t have the “nothing by mouth during labor” policies that much of the US has, so there are plenty of opportunities to conduct this research. I agree that more could be done (more research could always be done.) I also note that this is an example of the type of research study that would be valuable to have, and to conduct, but that often has difficulty getting funded by granting agencies, in part because there is very little financial incentive. Unlike, for example, drug trials, where there is a potential to accrue substantial profit, there’s not much of a profit motive in researching recommendations about eating and drinking during labor. So, while not a barrier to research per se, it may be a barrier to research funding (which, in turn, can be a disincentive for researchers to pursue it if their positions, tenure decisions, etc., depend on winning grants.) Just to add some nuance to the research side of the conversation. (The “research base” for the policy, incidentally, is one weakly-designed study from 40+ years ago. Hardly ironclad scientific proof.)

    Re. the excessive vomiting, two thoughts: in the first place, from what I understand, most women in labor either a) don’t feel very much like eating, or b) don’t feel like eating very much, and are unlikely to have a “full belly”. By the time it mattered, they almost certainly wouldn’t have enough food in their stomachs to produce “excessive” vomiting. You also might want to look at Ina May Gaskin’s Birth Matters and/or Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth for her discussion of what she calls “Sphincter Law.” This is something you won’t find in the academic research literature – it’s based on Ina May’s personal experience and observation of several thousand births. She has noticed that, while it’s true that vomiting is a not-infrequent side effect of eating in labor, it seems to assist in advancing it by helping to cause involuntary relaxation of the sphincter muscles.

    There is also a strong case to be made that a woman in labor may well need the calories to be able to complete the physical work of giving birth. Depriving her of food may prevent vomiting, but it may also exhaust her and lead to far more aggressive interventions. Compared with a C-section, I think many women (though perhaps not all) would feel that vomiting is by far the lesser of two evils. So I find the argument of “why add risk if there is no real need?” unconvincing. How does the doctor know there isn’t a “real need” for any given laboring woman to get a calorie boost in order to finish what she’s trying to do?

    I agree with you that each woman is different, and I certainly would never say that anyone should be forced to eat in labor. Plenty of women find that they just don’t feel like it, and that should be respected. But neither should a woman be deprived of food if she wants it or feels that she needs it, as some women do. It should be left to the laboring woman’s discretion. (And, incidentally, if hospitals were to adopt that policy, it would be significantly easier to conduct a US-based observational study on eating during labor, if not an RCT, which could be ethically questionable.)

    Post # 13
    Member
    1887 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @KC: Interesting points! 

    @NJmeetsBX:  I feel like I accidentally thread-jacked and am so sorry!  I didn’t expect this and will delete my one post that is still editable.  The person it was for probably already saw it by now anyway.  I should have sent a pm. Please accept my apologies. 

    Post # 14
    Member
    339 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2013

    My FI and I are taking three classes at our hospital. “Your amazing new born” it’s a 6 week class. Then “prepared childbirth” and then “breastfeeding”. None of ours start till October but I’m ready!

    Post # 15
    Member
    664 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2012

    My midwife really recommends prenatal breastfeeding classes strongly. She’s found that lots of new moms have never even seen breastfeeding up close (which was true in my case), so they don’t know how to tell if baby is getting enough to eat, if the latch is good, etc. I know lots of people are naturals at it, but I think for the $10 that it costs in my area it’s worth it to get some tips ahead of time.

    Post # 16
    Member
    15 posts
    Newbee

    I prepared for l&d by reading homebirth stories (b/c they were the most successful at having natural births), stayed away from medicated or induced birth stories (although I was well versed on all intervention & their risk vs benefit ratio & how I was okay using them if necessary), and I did all I could to trust my body…. that along with having a likeminded support system & it went much smoother than when I read the Bradley Method book & tried to use that. My #1 thing is if you’re going for a natural birth, skip the hospital class… it’s deflating & just gives insight on the hospital policy that dictates most births.

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