(Closed) What Do You Do When You Leave?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
3830 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

He is fine in his kennel. It keeps him safe so try not to feel so bad.  Maybe section off a safe zone for while you are gone.  My (almost 2 as well) dog has his crate in a bedroom that he hangs out in while we are gone. The bedroom is safe and then we dont have destruction everywhere.  He has destroyed a few things, but usally he is okay. 

Good idea is to stuff a kong and freeze it.  Should keep him busy for awhile when you leave. 

Post # 5
Member
1607 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Crate training is the way to go, and get him a walker so he’s not bored all day and a maniac when you get home!

Post # 6
Member
3830 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@amazingbee:  get another one and stack them.  Or pay for day care every few days. 

You have options. 

Post # 7
Member
8042 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2013

@amazingbee:  You mean you leave him in a tiny box all day long? Isn’t that kinda mean?

Could you train him to go on pee pads or whatever they’re called? I assume he’s just tiny if he’s a Yorkie. At least let him stay in one room (closed door).

I would take him to doggy daycare. My coworker has a big dog and he goes for a few days during the work week. That way he gets some company and exercise.

Post # 8
Member
4275 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I kept my dog in a kennel everytime I left the house until I knew I could trust him to have free roam of the house. It became his little sanctuary. We know longer lock him up in it, instead we leave it open and he goes it in on his own to sleep and chew on his toys.

Post # 9
Member
107 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@amazingbee:  I’ve got a boy who’s about 2 as well and we’ve had a similar issue. Both of our dogs are crate trained but he’s still fairly new to us and prone to accidents if he gets left out of the crate. I hate to say it because I know it doesn’t really help, but I think keeping him crate trained is the best way to go. Maybe you could try a more structured potty and feeding schedule? Say you leave for work at 8AM, he should be fed at about 7AM and taken to potty at about 7:30/7:45AM so he doesn’t have a full tank all day. Then he should immediately be taken out to potty whenever the first person gets home and then fed and taken out to potty at a consistent time in the evening as well. I’m not an expert, but that’s some of the advice I got for Pilot (our boy) when we were having trouble with him holding it all day or having accidents. Dogs respond well to structure, routine and consistency. I hope that helps!

PS – Our dog is much bigger so my times may be off on when to take him out after eating, but the point was that a very set schedule may help! I’m fairly certain dogs don’t normally have accidents out of spite (like cats do) but they have them because they genuinely can’t hold it or are trying to tell you something is wrong. I’d also probably take him to the vet just to rule out urinary tract infection or something similar. It’s unlikey but always possible. 

Post # 10
Member
107 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@Cady:  +1 – Our first dog doesn’t have to stay in her crate all day anymore because she proved she can be trusted out of it while we’re away. Little yorkie just needs more time.

Post # 11
Member
5968 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2018

@amazingbee:  I understand feeling guility about leaving your baby at home…I have three of them and let me tell you…those sad eyes are killer! BUT!  I’m a person and they are dogs, and we have an agreement about our lives together, and that agreement is that I will love them, feed them, keep them safe, play with them and keep them in the best of health, no matter what as long as they don’t piss or shit in my house!!!

First off, if he’s not neutered, he needs to be, boys that are not like to mark their territory, if you have him neutered it will help curb that. 

I get that we all have lives and things we need to do and our animals are not always welcome at those events.  It’s important that he gets his time outside, with you and maybe a housebreaking refresher course, because yorkies are smart and he knows better. 

 

Post # 12
Member
2686 posts
Sugar bee

I agree with the PP’s about crating him.  At first, I did not want to crate my pup, but her trainer said it’s really in the dog’s best interests.  Dogs will learn the crate is their den and is a safe place, and dogs will do what they can to ensure they do not soil their den.  They don’t want to eat and sleep where they poop any more than we do.

 

We crated ours for about a year, then transitioned her to having free roam of the house when her behavior improved.  After keeping her fully crated for a while, we would leave the crate door open and close off some space for her to roam, so she could sleep in the crate or on a bed nearby.  If she had an accident, she’d go back to the full crate for a day or two.  Then we gradually gave her more space as she learned how to behave, and now she has full roam of the house while we’re gone.  And usually if there is an accident, it’s because she has a stomach bug or some other illness that messed up her schedule.  You should also try to keep a consistent feeding/bathroom schedule (if you don’t do so already) so you can predict if and when he may need to go.

Post # 13
Member
1508 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@bleusteel:  This exactly! If you crate train, they learn it’s a safe place for them, not a punishment. Sure he might be bored while you are gone but dog can’t tell time, he won’t know if you are gone 5 min vs 5 hours etc.

You could get him a little bit bigger crate so he has more room and make sure he has some toys/chewy’s to entertain himself. **NOte on the bigger crate, do not get a huge one for a little dog, if they have too much space they will often use part of it as a washroom.

Post # 15
Member
2832 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

My Fi built a gate that spans accros the kitchen. it’s about 3 feet high and hooks on both sides of the kitchen. He has lots of room and can see whats goign on. Since you live in an apartment, i think it would be easy to cover any holes left from drill marks once you move.

Or something like this… you could probably put it in the kitchen or bathroom:

 

http://www.dog-gates.com/richell-freestanding-pet-gate-small.html?gclid=CLbZu7SZw7YCFULZQgod3jMAFA

Post # 16
Member
6124 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@amazingbee:  I am starting to think he is paying us back for being gone.

 

If you read any dog book, you will quickly learn that dogs don’t do things out of spite.  They just don’t work that way in the canine world.  They also don’t have jealousy emotions.  They might look like it but there is a different explanation.

 

I’m thinking that he was just never fully housetrained.

 

Sounds like you will have to treat him as a new puppy.  Crate him when you cannot watch him.  As soon as you take him out, go outside immediately for a potty.  He has to learn that as soon as he is freed, he will get to relieve him self. 

 

Also after any indoor playing, you need to take him out right away for apotty.  Reward him when he does potty (treats, praise).

 

If he’s in a crate for 8 hours, and if he can stand up and move around, that is OK.  It is not cruel.  The idea is not to have the crate so big he can lay at one end and pee in the other and not get wet. 

 

But you need to be vigilant – as would any dog owner – about getting him proper exercise every day.

I think he would benefit from a quick walk around the block every morning to fully empty his bladder.

 

My 60 pound dog will get TWO potty breaks in the morning before we go to work.  She’s is fine for 8-9 hours.  In fact when we do come home and go outside right away, she rarely pees immediately.  She’d rather sniff everything then pee like 10 minutes later.

 

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