What IS Moissanite?

posted 3 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
327 posts
Helper bee

@emmrr3:  it is silicon-carbide.  Diamonds are compressed carbon, moissanite is compressed silicon carbide. It was originally found on a meteor, is extremely rare, so the ones you see in jewelry are man made.  It has similar properties to diamonds so people use them in jewelry in a similar fashion, including engagement rings.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moissanite

Post # 4
Member
3010 posts
Sugar bee

@emmrr3:  your best bet is to look at that wiki page or google it.

Post # 5
Member
300 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Mosinite is synthetic(man made) silicon carbide.   Moissanite was introduced to the jewelry market in 1998. Its ethical production makes it a popular alternative to diamonds. In many developed countries, the use of moissanite in jewelry has been patented; these patents expire in 2015 for the US, and 2016 in other countries.  

Post # 6
Member
3112 posts
Sugar bee

@emmrr3:  Moissanite is my favorite stone!

From MoissCo:

Possessing fire, brilliance, and luster that far surpasses even that of a diamond, Moissanite twinkles and sparkles unlike any gemstone on earth. Composed of carbon and silicon, the Moissanite crystal is one of the hardest andtoughest known elements on earth, making it extremely resistant to scratching, chipping and breaking. 

Moissanite, also known as silicon carbide, was first discovered in minute quantities from particles carried to earth by a meteorite 50,000 years ago. It is now available as faceted gemstones in a large array of shapes and sizes. 

Unlike other brilliant stones that cloud and dull with time, Moissanite is guaranteed to never lose its optical properties. Therefore, it will be every bit as beautiful, fiery and brilliant generations from now as the day you purchase it.

Fifty thousand years ago a meteorite crashed into the Arizona desert creating what is now known as “Meteor Crater.” Fragments of this meteorite were scattered across the desert. Hidden in these fragments was a brilliant secret waiting to be discovered. In 1893, Nobel-Prize winning scientist Henri Moissan began studying fragments of this meteorite in nearby Diablo Canyon. In these fragments Dr. Moissan discovered minute quantities of a shimmering new mineral, with fire and brilliance never before seen on earth. After extensive research, Dr. Moissan concluded that this mineral was made of silicon carbide. 

Diablo Canyon

In 1905, well-known Tiffany & Co. gem expert and mineralogist, George Kunz, suggested the new jewel be named moissanite in Dr. Moissan’s honor. Despite this amazing discovery, since naturally occurring quantities of moissanite are so small, it would be another century before this stunning mineral would emerge as the brilliant jewel it is today. 

In the late 1980’s, inspired by Dr. Moissan’s discovery, a North Carolina company named CREE developed a proprietary process for producing large single crystals of Moissanite. 

In the summer of 1995, a master diamond cutter observed samples of Moissanite and suggested that properly cut crystals would make a brilliant new jewel. From there scientists from CREE and eventually Charles & Colvard began a three-year research project to bring the fire and brilliance of Moissanite jewels to consumers.

Post # 7
Member
1209 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@emmrr3:  it’s a lab created gemstone. 

Post # 9
Member
8418 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@emmrr3:  cool thing about moissanite (I’ve had mine for over 2 years) is it doesn’t attract oils/lotions/grease like a diamond does.  I rarely clean my ring, and when I do, it’s only to clean the diamond sidestones, my moissy stays sparkly no matter what.

Post # 11
Member
1427 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

Moissanite is a compound of silicon and carbon, so it’s chemical name is Silicon Carbide. In nature, it occurs in colors ranging from green, black, yellow, blue, to clear/white. There are over 200 sub-types, and originally it was produced synthetically in the late 1800s as an abrasive, then later in the late 1900’s grown as a single crystal for many industrial applications, and finally, someone realized that gem quality SiC would make a stunning jewel, so a particular type of SiC is grown by CREE in rough form, purchased by C&C, and they facet the cultured/lab grown rough into jewels for jewelry use. The common name of what is offered now is moissanite, and comes from C&C. While moissanite is incredibly common outside our solar system, it occurs in minute quantities on earth, as well has having been discovered in meteor particles.  SiC is doubly refractive, has indistinct cleavage planes, a 9.25 on the MOHS scale, has a refractive index of 2.55, making gem quality SiC one of the most brilliant, tough, firey, and hard choices for jewelry wear. Currently offered moissanite from C&C has a slight green/grey/yellow undertone, depending on the stone, which some love, and some don’t, and can vary from stone to stone. Some are very white with negligible undertones, and some are quite mint green/yellow. Another company will be coming out with a true colorless form of SiC called the Amora Gem, but that will not be available in many countries until 2015, but will be super exciting to see! 😀

Post # 14
Member
8418 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@emmrr3:  I have eczema too!!  It’s actually one of the reasons I love this stone so much lol (not the eczema, the fact that lotion/ointment doesn’t like to cling to it).

Post # 15
Member
11300 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

@housebee:  !!! I did not know this. Booooo, why did I not find the Bee before I got engaged?! They even have OECs! ughhhh

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