(Closed) What Organic products do you use…

posted 4 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
11242 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

I don’t have any suggestions, but please remember that (in the US) in order for something to be organic, it MUST have the USDA organic seal on it somewhere. Burt’s Bees sensitive skin facewash is not organic.

Post # 4
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee

@vorpalette:  The USDA seal means it’s certified organic. Certification is an expensive and time-consuming process, and for some small businesses the costs are prohibitive. There are products and producers out there who follow organic standards and practices but who don’t want to/can’t afford to go through the formal certification process. For example, a lot of the vendors at farmers’ markets around here are “unofficially” organic.

If you’re buying products in a mainstream grocery store, you are absolutely right, you want to look for that seal, and for a company the size of Burt’s Bees, they would presumably go through the certification if they truly were organic and wanted to make that claim. If you are able to buy local and know your producers, though (especially with things like food) you can find organic products even if they don’t carry the official label.

@June232012:  Check out clearandsmoothskin.com for Carley’s products. They aren’t all necessarily certified organic, but they do a great job with fragrance-free, chemical-free, additive-free personal care products: soap, moisturizer, etc. Their Tamanu cream is wonderful for stretch marks, too!

Post # 5
Member
11242 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

@KCKnd2:  Yes, I know that. I worked for a certified organic company (and there are ways to be reimbursed for the bulk of the cost of the certification process). The problem with companies that AREN’T certified is that you don’t know that their products are actually organic. There’s nothing stopping anyone from using the word organic on their products. I could tell you that my apple is organic, but how do you know that it truly is?

Post # 6
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee

@vorpalette:  As I pointed out in the previous post, a lot of it depends on whether you can (or are able to) source your products locally. If you know and trust the producer, you can have confidence in their claims and often see their operation for yourself. For example, I have a lot more confidence in the quality of the eggs I get from the farmers’ market (“unofficial” organic and pasture-raised) than I would in eggs that carry the USDA seal but were purchased from a mainstream grocery store, or from Wal-Mart or something. I know that there are a lot of hairsplitting definitions for organic/free-range/etc. labeling for eggs, and sometimes it can mean the chickens have access to the outdoors (i.e. a small opening in their shed that leads to a fenced-in, gravel-covered very small yard that few or no chickens actually make use of). I prefer the non-certified eggs that I know come from an actual farm with real grass a few miles out of town. It’s possible the farmer could be lying, of course, but I doubt it: a small, local businessperson depends a lot more on his/her integrity and local word-of-mouth to stay in business than a bigger company needs to.

If you don’t have access to a trusted local source, though, you are right about looking for the certification.

Post # 7
Member
3083 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I LOVE Kiss My Face products.  I use their shampoos and conditioners.  Instead of lotion I use organic coconut oil (I cook with it too!)

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