what's needed for combo of breastfeeding + pumping

posted 3 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
1721 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I think you have a great list to start. The medela pump is definitely worth the cost.  If you buy a cheaper one you will probably regret it and end up spending the money twice.

A few other things:

1. Bottled water/snacks.  Breastfeeding makes you INSANELY hungry/thristy.  You won’t want to/be able to get up in the middle to get yourself something, so make sure you have things easily accessible.

2. At least 3 sets of pump equiptment.  When you have your baby you are not going to want to be washing things all the time, so having an extra set to hook up is super helpful.

3. Desire to succeed and outside support. Breastfeeding is really hard and it does hurt at first (about 3 weeks).  It also comes with a lot of possible challenges.  A good support system, be it family, friends, or a lactation consultant, will make a huge difference.

Post # 4
Member
2740 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

Don’t forget nursing bras and nursing tanks.  I lived in the Bravado clip-down nursing tanks while I was on maternity leave!

Post # 6
Member
409 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Are you in the US? Double check with your insurance company before you buy a pump – the cost is probably covered for you thanks to the affordable care act. 

Post # 7
Member
76 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: February 2013

My biggest peice of advice is: Know how to do it! Get a video to watch before and after the birth (not a book – you won’t have enough hands to read afterward!).

You have to demand feed first to establish your supply, then move into a routine (say every 3-4 hours) after a few weeks. Lots of well-meaning friends/family will advise you to establish a routine FIRST. Get a really comfy nursing chair (like a rocker/recliner) – you will spend the first couple of weeks almost glued to it!  It has to be comfy enough to fall asleep in.  Some people can feed lying down (ie: in bed) but not everyone can.

I only had one set of pumping “bits” but found the microwave sterilizer bags fantastic!

Lastly, when you are sore from feeding/pumping/just being so darn full of milk, a frozen breast pad is the nicest thing ever. Just spray it with water and pop it in the freezer 🙂 The nipple cream helps in the long term, but a frozen breast pad gives you instant releif!

Post # 8
Member
76 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: February 2013

@Schatzie821:  “Desire to succeed and outside support. Breastfeeding is really hard and it does hurt at first (about 3 weeks).  It also comes with a lot of possible challenges.  A good support system, be it family, friends, or a lactation consultant, will make a huge difference.”

What she said!

Don’t get the idea that breastfeeding is “easy” or feels “natural” to begin with. It is HARD.  It seems like an eternity of pain at the time, but despite the early difficulties, it is soooo rewarding and beneficial to bubs in the longer term 🙂

 

Post # 9
Member
1721 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@newname_99:  I mean the nipple shield parts and the attachable bottles 🙂  You might have meant those things in your list, not sure.

Post # 12
Member
1721 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Oh!  I almost forgot, a comfortable nursing cover for breast feeding in public.  I used this all the time!  You might be able to get one free (well you pay for shipping) but it’s not much.

Post # 13
Member
415 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@newname_99: 

 Just a side note to the pain comments (and having not yet experience the pain since I’m still pregnant) — but our breastfeeding teacher repeatedly said that breastfeeding shouldn’t hurt and if it does then there’s something that a lactation consultant needs to help you fix, like a latch problem or a positioning issue. So if you do run in to trouble/ow, then she said call right away rather than toughing it out!

 

Post # 14
Member
1721 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@canadablue:  I agree with you in a way, but breastfeeding does hurt at the beginning, even if you are doing it correctly.  Your nipples are not used to being used in that manner and they are extremely sensitive from all the hormonal changes your body is experiencing.  That meaning said, it is more of a soreness than sharp stabbing pains.  Yes, if you have sharp pains then there is likely an issue with latching, positioning, or a tongue tied baby. Once you get good at it and your nipples toughen up a bit, then it will not hurt any longer (if there are no other issues at hand).

 

I worked with the top lactation consultant in the state and they provided me with a ton of support and my son and I have a great breastfeeding relationship.  I’m not saying I am an expert, but just saying that if you feel some soreness or even a little pain, it doesn’t necessarily mean something is wrong, it can just be your body getting used to things/being super sensitive. I am sure some people will feel the soreness I describe and think nothing of it while others will find it horrid, everyone has different pain tolerances.

ETA- I hope all of you have no pain/difficulties with nursing and I think it’s awesome you want to try for it!

Post # 15
Member
728 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Good advice ladies. For me breastfeeding was pretty easy, natural and painless. I’m sure it isn’t for everyone though. I also couldn’t have done it in the beginning without my boppy breastfeeding pillow. Bring it to the hospital with you.

Post # 16
Member
455 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I don’t think you need special sterilizing equipment; you can just boil stuff in water.  I had some pretty bad nipple damage, but I don’t think that’s normal and hope it won’t happen to you.  But for the fairly extreme damage I had (as in skin was removed and big patch of pink flesh exposed), my nipple shield along with the prescription “Canadian nipple cream” (developed by Jack Newman) saved the day.  With that level of damage, I don’t think I could have fought through the pain otherwise.  I got help from a lactation consultant, but by the time I did (baby was less than 2 full days old!) the damage had already been done.  So those things allowed my nipples to heal while working on the latch.  Which honestly, I still can’t do right.  It’s like a skill I can’t seem to master . . .

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