(Closed) What’s this photography style called?

posted 8 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
44 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2012

There’s not an official name but you can say it’s a vintage colored photo.

And it’s done at post-production.

Post # 4
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

I love that “style’ although i’m not sure if there is a proper name for it.  I think most photogs call it a vintage look or a warm look.  Some of it is done post production but some is shot that way in camera.  The ones were just a tiny piece is in focus and everything super blurry is done with a tilt-shift-lens others are done with the sun strategically placed behind the subject.  As for the documenting of the images it’s a mixture of documentary {photojournalism, i just think that term is over used} and candid portraiture {set up shot but caught a moment}.  This style is very popular on the west coast as the sun in the evening makes them a bit easier to archive.

Good luck, can’t wait to see who you pick.

Post # 5
Member
122 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I believe it’s called photojournalistic photography.  

Post # 6
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

@dsuhornets, this is not a photojournalistic style.  Yes there are some captured moments, but for the most part a lot of those shots are set up in a way to achieve that look.

Post # 8
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

Hi 37 Butter Knives,

I forgot to say welcome to the bee in my first post so I’m doing that now.

I can see where you may think hiring a news photojournalist because they would know how to shoot on the fly, but here are some issues to think about.  The first being weddings are crazy and you have to know how to anticipate the moments , know how things flow and have a good handle on dealing with tricky wedding situations.  If you are looking for a completely hands off, no or very limited portraits or direction then they will work for you. If you want to have good group or artsy portraits then its a good idea to hire someone who knows how to give direction, keep your family and wedding party happy, and keep to a strict time-line all while juggling the technical aspects of getting the shots you are going to want to hire someone with lots wedding experience. There is also the issue of hiring someone who isn’t familiar with the business side of weddings.  Not to knock weekend warriors, but a small studio that supports it’s self on serving their wedding clients is going to put more in then someone who is doing it for extra cash but doesn’t need to to pay the bills with satisfying their clients.

My FH and both have backgrounds in photojournalism, but we also have very strong skills in lighting and posing people so they look their best.  Any good to great photographer will know how to handle tricky lighting situations like a dark church or reception. I recommend looking for photographers who have this vintage style in their portfolio but also have strong candid moments. Maybe a photojournalist turned seasoned wedding photog like FH and I. It really just depends on how important photos are to you.  

Although, a lot of that look is done in post production the photog would still need to be shooting towards then end result of that style.

A tilt shift lens is a very expensive and technically challenging lens used in architecture photography.  It is a new trend in wedding photography. Then lens gives you the option of picking what you want in and out of a range of focus.  Another word for it is  Bokeh.  There are ways in photoshop to do this, but i don’t think it ever looks as good as the real thing. A {Just a note on editing, true photojournalists are not very skilled in photoshop as it is unethical to doctor a news image.}

I Love simplybloom as well, I’ve been following them for years. Amazing amazing artists!

Feel free to PM me anytime with photo questions.

Post # 9
Member
1000 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

I agree that those are all vintage-style except the last photographer. They MAY have thrown in one vinatagey looking photo on the first page. Vintage is in fact an effect done in post processing that most photographers are capable of doing. So then the question becomes, do you want all your photos to look vintage? Or just a couple of them for funsies? I would definitely ask yourself that to help you decide if you want a photographer who specializes in vintage or not. Looks like you found a few good ones who do.

Post # 10
Member
34 posts
Newbee

Man, it’s so hard because EVERYONE says they have a photojournalistic style.  I’d call those artistic, and I also agree with vintage and warm.  I’d say pretty positively that all of that coloring was done in Photoshop.

My feeling is that people either know how to do that or they don’t.  I’d say when you’re looking around at photographers, if you see a lot of that style of photos on their site, you’re probably in good shape.  If you don’t, chances are unlikely that describing it to them will make your photos turn out that way.  

Good luck!  And just to throw in a tiny heads up, so you aren’t totally shocked … photographers that shoot that way are likely to be more expensive, because there’s more skill, know-how, time, and raw talent involved in making it look right.  But I think it’s worth it!  The images are so pretty. 

Post # 11
Member
1000 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

Sarah. I don’t know whether they charge more or not, but I disagree about these types of photos requiring more time and talent, and photographers either being able to do it or not. There are about a million different Photoshop and Lightroom actions out there to make your photo look vintage or different variations of vintage, with the click of a button. From a shooting POV, it’s easy to soften focus by taking clarity away post processing, but you can’t make a photo with soft focus sharp.

Post # 12
Member
34 posts
Newbee

I don’t know, LB, I’ll stand behind it still.  I definitely think that being able to do it RIGHT requires more time and talent, because in general, I don’t think Photoshop actions are the greatest when it comes to things like that–there are still a lot of adjustments that have to be made by hand, based on the original lighting, exposure, etc., and I think that the overall look and mood of the picture does take a certain eye and flair that not everyone can pull off.  As far as shooting, I totally agree with you–I wouldn’t want to soften focus in PS (messing with that in post always looks artificial to me), so I agree that you have to have proper focus in a photo.  However, a lot of those pics looked to me like they were shot at a really wide aperture, which of course we all know comes from a lens that is most likely mega expensive, which also drives up cost.  I mean, we can definitely agree to disagree on the time and talent issue though.  I can definitely see what you’re saying about Photoshop, I just don’t think everyone really knows how to work that look to max effect.

Post # 13
Member
1068 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

Yes, I have heard some photographers refer to this as vintage as well

Post # 14
Member
122 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

@Pizzuti thank you for correcting me.  I was only taking a shot at it.

Post # 15
Member
1000 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

Sarah, it’s very nice to have you on the boards 🙂 I suppose since neither of us specialize in vintage photographs no one can make any surefire claims to being right. I did just want to let you know, though, that if you are interested in buying a super-wide aperture lens (F1.4 is the widest they make) it is really not very expensive at all. I have an F1.4, which was a little over $500 and an F1.8, which only cost $150! Definitely not bad considering my two F2.8 zoom lenses were over 2k each.

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