Whats what's the best career to pick when you just don't care?

posted 2 weeks ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
1255 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2017

Is there any hobby you enjoy? Any talents or skills? There is something for everyone. Maybe there’s a job for your skill you don’t know about yet. 

Post # 3
Member
9515 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

chrissybee :  why don’t you try doing make up or hair on the weekends for extra money. You’d have to specialize in live events/weddings but you could build up clients and make some extra money.

Post # 5
Member
9515 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

chrissybee :  oh, I thought you had the BG but didn’t want to risk the full time thing. Got it!

Post # 6
Member
517 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

if you have basic, good office skills, I would do Administrative Assistant/Office Manager type work. Pays decent, and you leave your work home at the end of the day, and you get a typical 9-5 schedule. Start out in temp jobs filling in for people going on maternity leave or somethign to get your feet wet. I did it for a few years right out of college. 

Post # 7
Member
517 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Maybe it would help if you told us what your previous careers are, and your skill set?

Post # 8
Member
13889 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Do you have a degree?  What do you do now?  Marketable skills?

I don’t really have anything I’m super passionate about or care to work.  But I went school for engineering cause I knew that at least the money would be decent.   I don’t really have a passion for my job, but I can do it, and while I’ll never be insanely rich doing it, I’m quite comfortable.

Post # 10
Member
517 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

After reading your skills, I still think you should continue down the admin assistant/office manager type role. The other skills you listed will need a lot more formal education around them, or are very competitive. 

thing is – in your situation, you just need to stay with your career path and gain higher and higher positions within it. Totally do-able. You’ve been in a secretary role for 5 years, now apply for a slightly more prestigious company or higher role. Learn that really well, learn the basic programs well, then do it again. And again. People make life long careers out of admin/secretary work, but don’t stagnate within them. They work for directors, VPs, executives…. Just decide that will be your “career job” and grow within it. You already have the start.

People don’t need college or a certain career title to have a good job – a waitress can do it, cashier at Target, whatever. They just need the committment to a certain career path and committment to grow within it and not just “do” their job and it will work out. Not saying you need to be the executive yourself, just that you can grow from admin to sr. admin…. cashiers can go to a team lead to store manager… just don’t say at 26, that the job you have now is the one you will retire with. Commit to making it YOUR career path. 🙂

Post # 11
Member
36 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2016

Why don’t you offer to consistently do hair/makeup for family and friends and see if you like it? They don’t have to pay you, so there won’t be the issue of having to be licensed. I’m not talking applying color or anything, but maybe blowouts, updos, and other styling you could easily do in your home, plus makeup. That way you’re not investing in cosmetology school until you know you really want to pursue it (you could end up enjoying doing your own hair/makeup, but not other people’s). I know you mentioned that you wouldn’t want to do the hard work to build up a client base, but if it’s something you end up enjoying, the work won’t seem so hard and you may excel naturally because you’re really good. If you end up making the same as you’re making now to start, what do you have to lose? Especially considering that hair/makeup is a booming business and has much higher earning potential than working at a call center. 

Post # 12
Member
638 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2017

I think admin asst  a good career for new you, too! I second the PP who suggested temp jobs as a way to get your foot in the door. I’ve gotten full time work through temp jobs. You could get admin asst work with a good company that pays well with good benefits. 

Post # 13
Member
1457 posts
Bumble bee

So you say you have no skills?  What is your education background?

Basically, you’re probably going to have to spend some money to make money.  There aren’t a lot of people willing to throw extra money around to people with out skills and with laissez faire attitudes about acquiring skills.  If you want more money than what people are willing to pay for the level of skills you have, then your options are work multiple jobs, find a way to acquire marketable skills, or win the lottery.  Trades pay well – plumbers, electricians, welders, CNC machinists.  Other occupations requiring few credits and certification like dental hygienist or paralegal or transcriptionist pay decently, too.  But unfortunately there aren’t a lot of quick fixes to get people to give you more for the same.  You will likely need to make an investment in yourself to gain the skills required.

Also, 40 years is a long time to work and not care about what you do.  You don’t have to be passionate about it, but eventually the minimal extra pay isn’t going to make up for 40 years of not liking or caring about what you do for 35% of your waking hours – closer to 45% if you factor in commutes and getting ready time that can’t be devoted elsewhere.

If you really don’t care, go to your local tech school, find the fastest certification program that leads to a job that pays an acceptable amount to you, and get the ball rolling towards that.

Post # 14
Member
817 posts
Busy bee

You’re in a bit of a paradox – you want to make money but you don’t want to work hard.  Those two things don’t add up.  Even lower paying so-called menial jobs require hard work.  Since you’re worried about benefits and retirement I’d recommend getting a part time gig at Starbucks as they treat their hourly employees well and supplementing the other 20 hours with something else.  

 

Post # 15
Member
16 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2017

As someone who is passionate about their career in healthcare, there is just so much wrong with this post.

I don’t mean to be rude but NEWSFLASH:

You spend more time at work than you do at home, with family, or with friends. Your career matters and you SHOULD enjoy what you do…whatever that is.

Not finishing college has unfortunately stuck you with the likelihood that you may struggle financially since a lot of jobs require a bachelors (I’m not saying I agree with this, I’m just saying it’s the way it is). Your best bet is to pursue more schooling. As for saying you don’t have the time…you’re 26. You can’t collect social security until 65 so you have a huge majority of your life left to work somewhere you hate unless you buckle down a get a skillset. The time will pass anyway, whether you’re in job training, or at school. Be tough on yourself and push yourself into further education or getting started making a side business out of a hobby you have now.

 

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