When should I start learning about pregnancy?

posted 2 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
Member
3756 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

I didn’t start reading about pregnancy until I got pregnant. 

Post # 3
Member
413 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2012 - Muckenthaler Cultural Center

I would suggest starting to take Folic Acid a year out from TTC 

 

As far as reading about pregnancy? There’s no need to until you are actively trying to get pregnant. 

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by  LionLove.
Post # 4
Member
3718 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I don t think you need to read up on pregnancy itself until you are pregnant. But I’d recommend reading a book called Taking Charge of Your Fertility. It’s amazing how much I didn’t know about GETTING pregnant and how all that works. even if you don’t go full on to taking your temperature and everything when you do TTC, knowing how the process works is super helpful!

Post # 6
Member
6028 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

I think you should learn as much about the general topic of pregnancy as you can, as soon as you can, and not just the OP. It’s frightening how many women truly do not understand how their bodies work, or how many people do not understand how babies are made. I was reading an article today about how more than 5% of college-educated women in the US actually believe they can’t get pregnant if they only have sex standing up !!! And that percentage goes up alarmingly as education levels decrease! Or men who believe that if they have had three daughters, that they can’t “make” sons. SMFH at the ignorance. Learning about the physical aspects of pregnancy can help you live a healthier life, regardless of if you’re actually ttc or not, because you’ll have a much deeper understanding of your body in general. Advice to anyone who wants or needs if, not just the OP. 

Post # 7
Member
2593 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

I agree with Horseradish that everyone should have at least a general understanding of fertility and pregnancy, but especially those who are planning on becoming pregnant soon, (and the book recommended by Glasgowbound, “Taking Charge of Your Fertility” should be REQUIRED READING for every woman).  I’m not saying you need to do countless hours of research and have your birth plan ready before you even start trying, but do educate yourself beyond what they taught in high school health class.

I don’t think you can ever be 100% prepared for what pregnancy actually is, but your should at least arm yourself with some basic knowledge beforehand.  I am 26 weeks pregnant, and there have been so many things that have come up that it felt good to know, “Yes, that’s normal,” so I didn’t freak myself out.  There have been a few times when I’ve gone to the women in my pregnancy group and they reassured me of the same when I wasn’t 100% sure what I was dealing with were normal.  

It’s surprising how little some people know about fertility and pregnancy.  From posts on here from women freaking out because they didn’t conceieve the first time they “pulled the goalie” (it can take a normal, healthy couple several months to a year to conceieve, even with no issues and perfect timing), or even being upset because they thought that taking the Plan B pill meant they had had an abortion, (Plan B blocks ovulation, and prevents conception from occuring, it does NOT abort a pregnancy if the egg has already been fertilized and implanted).  

Post # 8
Member
3360 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

I agree with PPs, at the very least read up some on conception and how your body works – I’m very well educated, and I was still shocked at how much I didn’t know about my own body when I read Taking Charge of your Fertility.  

As far as reading about pregnancy, it’s of course not a requirement that you do lots of reading before pregnancy (or even during!), but I’ve found it really helpful to already have a basic understanding of when different developments happen, what’s normal at different times, etc., because pregnancy is already an overwhelming experience in itself.  I probably started reading about a year before TTC, but that was mostly because I already had major baby rabies and was just waiting until we could start trying.  Now that I’m pregnant (16 weeks), the only pregnancy reading I’m really doing is the little daily updates I get on the app I have on my phone.  Otherwise, I’m reading about labor/delivery and doing research into what I’ll need to have/do to actually take care of the baby.  It’s nice to be able to focus on those things rather than do lots of reading now about what’s going on in my body.

Post # 9
Member
2421 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: February 2015

Horseradish:  Agreed.  100%! 

I’m a firm believer that you can never learn too much.  You can freak yourself out with horror stories if you don’t balance your reading, but that’s up to you. 

Post # 10
Member
4029 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

Meant2Bee:  I think it’s smart to start looking at the financial stuff as early as possible. What’s daycare cost in your area? How much of hospital costs will your insurance cover? Was your insurance put into effect after the ACA was implemented so that all prenatal and then well baby check ups are covered? Or is it like mine which was grandfathered and therefore those costs are on DH and I? I say start thinking of finances now, just to see if you’re on track to enjoy pregnancy and time at home with baby without too much financial stress.

The actual learning about pregnancy and all that…I would actually start reading up on conceiving and your body so you understand the entire process and can use that when you begin trying. Once you do that (maybe a few months before trying) then read on pregnancy when you begin trying for a baby.

DH and I are TTC this coming summer, but I love learning about pregnancy (always have) and childbirth. I think it’s fascinating.

Post # 11
Member
4029 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

Horseradish:  Agree with you completely. I did know a lot about conception and pregnancy early because I find them both fascinating and have always known I wanted to be a mother. Even with that, once I began charting and read Taking Control of Your Fertility, I realized there was still so much I needed to learn. One of my colleagues (I’m a teacher) teaches the Child Development courses. She said it is astounding the number of students-even the pregnant teenagers in the class-who thought you could get pregnant from oral or anal sex. Wow.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by  KatiePi.
  • This reply was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by  KatiePi.
Post # 12
Hostess
4941 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

Knowledge is power! I read up as soon as I found out I was pregnant, but you could definitely stat now! But for the love of God, DON’T READ “What To Expect When You’re Expecting”. That book is…just don’t haha. It’ll scare the heck out of you. Unnecessary stress.

Post # 13
Member
2421 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: February 2015

I have three books that came highly recommended to me:  Taking Charge of Your Fertility, The Impatient Woman’s Guide to Getting Pregnant and The Mother of All Pregnancy Books (the last one may be Canadian specific – I know all the references in it were Canadian.  Several friends have recommended it.)  And everyone said the same thing as the PP – Avoid ‘What to Expect’.

Post # 14
Member
795 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’m researching now and I’m two years out. I don’t want the stress of trying to do it when I’m pregnant in-case my emotions and what not are wonky. Like PP’s have said you can never know enough. I enjoy researching the different aspects so DH and I can prepare financially as well. 

Post # 15
Member
199 posts
Blushing bee

There are definitely things you can learn and do prior to TTC that can be very helpful.  Start taking prenatal vitamins about a year out (though earlier wouldn’t hurt) especially folic acid.  Read about fertility and pregnancy.  If you need to, take steps to get yourself closer to your ideal weight.  Make sure you’re good on all vaccines and get your yearly gyn visit done.    Learn how to chart and start doing it Well before you are TTC.  I recently had a miscarriage and I’m waiting for my body to return back to normal but I don’t know what normal is because I got pregnant on the first cycle that I started charting

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