(Closed) When to ask for a raise?/Should I ask for a raise?

posted 5 years ago in Career
Post # 4
Member
7796 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I think now (that you found out what the new hire is earning) is the perfect time to ask! Speak with the appropriate person and say something like, “Why am I not being rewarded (with a raise) for being in this job 2 years, when a new hire with the same experience is getting 50000?”

BTW I’ve never done this myself, but I was once in a job where someone else was in the same situation and when he asked, he was effectively asking on my behalf too. We both got the raise 🙂

Post # 6
Member
7796 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@careerdriven:  Sorry, I’m really terrible at this sort of thing and I don’t think I’m the person to ask. Because like I said, it only worked for me because someone else (who started at the same time as me, before the new hire) asked.

OK, having said that I’m terrible at it, my feeling is to ask in person. It’s just a bit more “off the record”. And that’s what my co-worker did.

But I really hope you can get some other answers, from people who have actually done it.

Post # 7
Member
241 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@careerdriven:  

I know this was a few weeks ago and you might have already decided how to handle the situation, but I personally think that you can’t go wrong with a personal conversation.  It makes you appear more direct and confident than just sending a letter which can come off passive-aggressive.  I would also recommend going into your scheduled meeting (not an impromptu sit down) with kind of an outline of what you want to discuss.  I would begin by mentioning your job performance highlights (your strong points, situations you have handled particularly well recently, etc.) and then explain that you have become aware that others are being brought into to your position with similar experience and being paid much more.  Then ask them if they are willing to match your compensation to better reflect your abilities and experience.  It costs much more money to hire a new person and train them than to keep an existing good employee happy.  Hopefully they’ll pony up the money.

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