(Closed) Where my ADHD bees at?

posted 5 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
1659 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@WillyNilly:  I’m here to see what responses are like…I’m not doing anything to treat right now and I’ve sort of refused to for the past couple of years.  I’ve been prescribed Adderall, Strattera, and Concerta and had not wonderful experiences with any of them so diet/exercise/etc have been my remedy but I don’t necessarily keep up.

DH is ready to strangle me, so I should probably do something about it, but I’m too busy starting things that I’ll never finish, reading 3 year old magazines while brushing my teeth for 10 minutes, and looking for my cell phone/glasses/keys/hairbrush/spatula.

Post # 5
Member
33 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Please do NOT worry that ADHD medications are going to alter the effectiveness of your Lexapro.  They won’t,  If anything, those medications will enhance each other in positive ways.

Almost everyone in my family has Tourette Syndrome, OCD, and ADHD (inattentive type).  We are also intelligent, which often delays the diagnosis for ADHD, because, to a certain point, you can make up for your attention deficit with other intellectual attributes.

I took an entire summer off to study for the pharmacy school entrance exam (the PCAT).  I went to my doctor to talk to him about my lack of motivation to study.  I had wasted the whole summer without studying for a single minute, and I only had two days left before the exam.  He asked me if I had ever been diagnosed with ADHD.  I told him that it runs in my family, but I didn’t think I had it that bad.  He told me to try methylin (Ritalin), and BOY was I wrong about my ADHD not being bad!  I was more productive in that next two days than I have ever been in any other two day period in my life.  I did well on the exam, by the way.  πŸ™‚

I wasn’t able to realize how much my inattentiveness affected my life until I was treated for it.  Now, with me, there is a bit of a trade-off with the Ritalin.  People with Tourette Syndrome aren’t technically supposed to take it, because it makes our tics worse.  I will always have to be on a pretty low dose, and the tics can get a little crazy if I drink more coffee than usual or if I am under a lot of stress.  Apart from that, I have had no side effects.  More importantly, it has not affected my fluoxetine’s (Prozac) effectiveness for my OCD.

Please please PLEASE try something for your ADHD!  If there is a side effect you don’t like, you can always tell your doctor you’d like to come off the medication.  These medications work immediately, so you’ll know right away if it’s something you want to stay on.

Post # 7
Member
33 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@WillyNilly:   I won’t judge, I promise!  In fact, I thank you for being honest with me… healthcare professionals have an awful lot of trouble getting patients to be honest with us, but it helps us make the right decisions.  πŸ™‚

It’s hard to make a real recommendation without knowing more about you, but I will tell you what I am thinking.  You described your reaction to Ritalin as feeling like you had a lot of caffeine.  This is the typical Ritalin reaction of someone who doesn’t have ADHD.  Most people with ADHD will become much calmer and more focused on a stimulant rather than experiencing stimulatory effects.  You did say you were officially diagnosed, though…

Let’s assume for the moment that your diagnosis is correct and that even though you have ADHD, you have still had these reactions to the medications you have taken.  I would not recommend the nonstimulant alternative Straterra (atomoxetine), because I wouldn’t want you on that with the Lexapro.  I would put you on one of the extended release stimulant medications to try to decrease the side effects and take it from there.  The medications in this class can affect different people differently, so you might have to try a few before you find one that works for you!

 

Post # 9
Member
2961 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I have ADHD but I do not take medications. It does not affect my relationships and I managed to get my education. I don’t consider it a disability at all, I believe some people simply use their brains differently than others.

Post # 11
Member
33 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@WillyNilly:  I wouldn’t say that Straterra is useless, but I will say that it is not as effective for most people as the other ADHD medications are.

With the limited information I have, I do consider it a possibility that your dose of the dexedrine could have been too high.  Increasing the dose beyond the point of effectiveness often increases the side effects without increasing the effectiveness of the drug.  Because it did seem to work so well for you, perhaps a significantly lower dose could be used and you could try it again.  

I would not recommend bupropion for you.  Even though it can be very effective, you expressed a history of anxiety.  The bupropion could make this worse.  This does not mean that you should never consider trying it if your doctor thinks it may be the right choice, but many doctors do not know that it can cause/exacerbate anxiety in people.

 

Post # 13
Member
5894 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

Check out the ADHD book by Daniel Amen. He talks about different types of add and ADHD and how each types needs a different type of med. I was lucky I was able to go to his clinic and get a brain scan. I was also having issues with depression that made my add unbearable. Dr Amen also has a depression and anxiety book. I recommend both. Following his advice I took meds for awhile, but I’ve been med free for several years.  

Post # 14
Member
33 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@WillyNilly:  I’m glad my posts have been helpful!  Your question is a complicated one.   I am not prepared to say that temporary mania cannot be induced in people without psychiatric illnesses such as bipolar disorder, but this is EXTREMELY uncommon with normal doses of legal stimulant medications.  Illegal stimulants are another story.  If someone shows signs of mania when on therapeutic doses of legal stimulants, that person should be evaluated for bipolar disorder among other things.  Also, hypomania is different from the standard criteria for a stimulant-induced mania, which is more severe.

By the way, I don’t know if you’re thinking that you might have bipolar disorder, but in case you are, I will tell you this:  If you start experiencing something that seems like hypomania/mania to you, this could have been brought on by the Lexapro.  People who are bipolar need a mood stabilizing regimen, not just an antidepressant.

Does this answer your question?

 

 

Post # 15
Member
33 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2014

One more thing before I go to bed for the night:  If a person without bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc. shows these signs while on a stimulant, the episode ends when the medication is out of the system.  This may not be the case with people with psychiatric illnesses, as an “episode” may have been triggered.

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