(Closed) Why do my friends think dads don't matter?

posted 5 years ago in Parenting
  • poll: How important are dads in the lives of their daughters?
    Absolutely neccessary : (43 votes)
    41 %
    Very important : (48 votes)
    46 %
    Somewhat important : (10 votes)
    10 %
    All you need is mom : (4 votes)
    4 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    2401 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @MrsFuzzyFace:  I think it is very important! My DH can teach my daughter somethings I can’t. My dad taught me things that my mom couldn’t teach me. NOT saying that single moms can’t teach their kids but the bond of daddy-daughter is unmistakable. I think dads play a huge part in kids lives. BOTH PARENTS DO.

    Post # 4
    Member
    6824 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    Most definately dad as well as mom are important in a child’s life.  A bond of father/daughter can be just as strong as mother/daughter relationship.  I am definately closer to my mom. But I can’t imagine life without having my dad around in my life. I was a daddy’s girl also growing up.

     

    Post # 5
    Member
    3175 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    I think it’s very important, though I’m guessing a lot of people discount the importance, because it insinuates that single moms can’t raise respectable daughters (and I 100% think they can, though I acknowledge it’s harder). I think that strong, male role models in a woman’s life can make up for the lack of a father, if necessary. I don’t think this means that dads “aren’t important”, it simply means that a woman isn’t doomed if, say, her dad dies, abandons her, or just isn’t interested in playing a role in her life.

    Post # 6
    Member
    9143 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

    Having two parents in general reduces the likelihood of trouble behaviors like experimenting with drugs and sex at a young age because you have two parents to keep tabs on the child.  There are definitely many factors involved but whether a child has two loving, stable and involved parents instead of one is a huge predictor of the noted behaviors.  Having a good father shows a daughter what traits and behaviors to look for in a boyfriend or husband.  Plus, it shows a daughter that a man can love her for more than just sex.

    Post # 7
    Member
    3357 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    I’m a big daddy’s girl, and it was him who drove me to strive for engineering. Now I’m in the field, loving my job, my life, and it’s all because of his guidance. I can’t imagine not having daddy around, though I’m sure that if I never knew him, I would have lived.

    Post # 8
    Member
    2840 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @MrsFuzzyFace:  I completely think there is a correlation and that good fathers are necessary for boys and girls.  Too many fathers are passive or completely uninvolved. It’s a tragedy, really.

    Post # 9
    Member
    6998 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2011

    I absolutely think having a dad (or strong male figure) who is involved in a young womans life deters them from making bad decisions and creates more self worth.  A lot of women who do not have that male figure will turn to men for the wrong sort of attention. I also think that if the father is too overbearing that can backfire and cause the same sort of issues ….There has to be a happy medium between praise and protection.

    Post # 10
    Member
    808 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: February 2013

    I had no dad and I did all the things girls with no dads do.

    Post # 11
    Member
    1765 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    My personal opinion is that having a good father can really teach a girl to respect herself. Having a father who treats her mother with respect, shows her what a healthy relationship is and doesn’t let her accept guys treating her like crap! I have a great relationship with my dad and I know it made a difference in my life.

    Post # 12
    Member
    18 posts
    Newbee

    I willingly walked out of my father’s life at 17 years old and haven’t looked back. After the divorce of him and my mother he hasn’t so much as sent a birthday card to either myself or my two other siblings, and just has never seemed interested in being in our lives. Granted, I think this is partly due to an undiagnosed mental-condition on my dad’s part, but he frustrates me so much with his negligence and inability to prioritize anything to do with being a father that I can’t stand to be around him. If I get married I am asking my mom to give me away. No if ands or buts. 

    I grew up, I work hard, got good grades and now own my own home and have a developing career. None of which my dad helped me with. In fact, the typical “father/daughter” bond that I see on television is very, very foreign to me. I just can’t imagine being close to my father, it’s just weird. 

    That said, I would say I am a sharp and mindful person and have a good head on my shoulders. I have definitely met a lot of unstable children that have had issues with their fathers and have had a rough time of it. So really I think missing one parent (mother or father) is going to affect any child somewhat. Just some children will be worse affected than others.

    Post # 13
    Member
    4513 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2010

    I think dads are just as important as moms, but my dad was not really in my life from a very early age, and I turned out pretty well. So, both parents are important and it’s ideal to have both. But the absence of a dad (or mom, I suppose) does not mean that a child will have sex at age 9 and drop out of school…

    Post # 14
    Member
    699 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    Coming from a woman with daddy issues I assure you fathers are absolutely essential for emotional stabilty in life. As a young girl I sought attention in places I shouldn’t have been and had no guidance. The older I get the more and more I realize just how much not having him as a strong leader in my life has effected me.

    I have a daughter now and I can’t tell you how important I think my SO’s relationship with her is. I constantly remind him how important he is.

    My SO read a really good book called “Strong Fathers, Strong Daughter’s” when we were pregnant. Short, easy read packed with information on how important dads are.

    Post # 15
    Member
    11234 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: August 2013

    I can’t vote, as there’s no “other” option.

    I was raised by a single mother (she was mostly uninvolved in my life, except for providing me the basics, so I basically raised myself), and I had no contact with my father. I didn’t drink, do drugs, or have sex at a young age. I wasn’t a troublemaker, I graduated high school with high honors, I did extracurriculars. I went to, and graduated from, college. I’m probably the oddball, though.

    Post # 16
    Member
    2401 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    I personally think this offensive to lesbian couples who have no issue raising healthy children without a man’s influence. 

    That being said, I was raised in a single mother household with limited contact with my father during my teen years. I came out just fine. 

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