Will you let your kid have an iPad or iPhone?

posted 3 years ago in Parenting
Post # 2
Member
2661 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

My almost 11 year old son has an ipad mini.  He got it for Christmas.  I control all the money on itunes and I review all the content.  I don’t mind him having it.  I control the amount of time he is permitted to use it as well.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by  NavyBee.
Post # 3
Member
599 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2016

Our children will have a basic, simple phone when they’re 10, and one replacement between that age and the age of thirteen, unless they deliberately broke the phone, in which case they’ll have no phone replacement. FI and I both have a mini iPad each, I’d like us to buy a family iPad when we have children so they can use it for games, learning etc. Maybe they’ll get a mini iPad (if they’re still around) when they’re in their early teens for personal use, although I would still like to monitor them with this (you never know what they’re seeing on these things)

Post # 4
Member
7281 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011 - Bed & Breakfast

My 16 year old has a dumb phone for the purposes of calling and texting. That’s it. We’ll upgrade to a smart phone when he gets his license so that he can have access to google maps and google nav for driving directions. I just don’t see how kids using tech is beneficial to their mental, emotional, and social development.

Post # 5
Member
1392 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

Warning. I am about to brag.

 

My 2.5 year old daughter has a few learning games (Endless Alphabet and Endless Numbers if you are interested. They are worth every penny.) on our iPad. She can identify the entire alphabet, both upper and lower case, as well as each letter’s phonetic sound as well as the letter based on the sound, and count to ten as well as identify numbers up to 29. She knows a slew of words most kindergartners don’t, and uses them correctly in context, can tell you many synonyms for words she uses,  and can identify many simple words in her environment (stop, dog, and, as well as her own name). We are constantly complimented in public on her vocabulary and speech. People never believe she is only 2.5. It does not help that she is already 3’2″ tall. Lol. 

 

With all of that being said, I am not a fan of unsupervised iPad use. She earns time on it by doing “chores”…feeding the dog,cleaning her toys up, helping with dinner, etc. We do those things together and then spend time with the iPad and talking about what we are learning. We usually spend the time that dinner is cooking with the iPad. We turn it off at dinner and eat as a family at the table, and we don’t have a TV, so I don’t feel like its a problem. She learns through her environment 90% of the time, so she’s not wasting her time in front of an iPad. 

Post # 6
Member
6028 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2013

 

Considering I have an iPad, I’d assume that my child will just use mine. I will also control how much time is spent on it…it won’t become “theirs”, they can just use it. As for the phone, my child will have a non-smartphone when they get to middle school and they can buy their own iPhone or other smartphone once they turn 16 (I’ll pay the bill, they have to buy the phone).  

Post # 7
Member
6034 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

There’s no reason a child can’t learn on books, and practice their alphabet by other toys. Kids do not need iPads or iPhones. My kids won’t get them till they’re teenagers (I don’t even have kids yet) and they’ll need to pay for them from their allowance.

Post # 8
Member
1392 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

lovekiss:  I am curious about your thoughts on television. When I was a kid, that’s where kids got their “tech”. I remember the educational shows addressing mental, emotional, and social aspects. Do you see television as a learning tool for your son, of the same way as an iPad type device could be, or is it detrimental? Genuinely curious here. I see both as a learning tool because my kid is 2 and hasn’t learned the ways of vegging out in front of an iPad or TV. What do I do when she gets bigger?!

Post # 9
Member
3806 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

nawella:  My husband and I are expecting our first and we will have a strict NO electronics rule. We are both highly intelligent people and we know that a person is capable of learning through other means. Computers, handheld devices, etc do not actually make people smarter. They actually delay development and delay primary action/ reaction circuits in the brain.

My husband is a computer programmer and I am an engineer. He learned computer programming without a computer. I learned the basics of mathematics (up through Pre-Calculus) without a calculator. And I could give a crap about “what everyone else is doing”. My kids will know how to speak to people, communicate with their words, and how to think critiquely and creatively.

Post # 10
Member
3618 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

nawella:  In todays world it is almost harmful to not give kids eletronic toys. I know people act like it’s a terrible thing for two year old to work an ipad but the world is changing and that kid will need those skills. When I was younger we had a class for typing and lots of parents thought that was stupid because kids shouldn’t be on computers. Heck, computers weren’t even around until most of the parents were in college!

I don’t want my child to be left behind.  

Post # 11
Member
765 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

this is interesting to see because as a speech therapist working in the schools with small children, I use the iPad CONSTANTLY to advance language skills with kids so now I’m wondering if I need to send special permission since there seems to be some people who don’t think they should use them for learning…

I won’t have a problem with my kiddo using an iPad, however, I will be the one controlling what goes on it, what they can use, and how much time they use it etc. When I was young it was Nintendo and Gameboy, now its iPad. Probably by the time my kiddo is a middle schooler it’ll be something else that I won’t understand how to use

Post # 12
Member
1392 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

TaurianDoll:  My child has used an iPad and has far superior skills than children even older than her that do not use an ipad. I think its pretty presumptious to think that a child using an iPad to refine basic skills cannot communicate adequately, or think creatively. 

My two year old is extremely creative, imaginative, and a wicked problem solver. I don’t think how she learns has anything to do with it. I think its based on her interactions with others. 

Post # 13
Member
3806 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

MammaPants:  Ok. Good for you. My kids will learn with books and puzzles. Good thing you have your kids and I will have mine.

Post # 14
Member
610 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014 - Smithfield Center

Yes, I will allow my child to have an iPad (granted we can afford it). There are a lot of personal reasons why people will/won’t allow their children to have access to such things. However, people have to understand that children today are being versed in technology and that will not go away no matter how much restriction you put on the access your children have to it. Skills that come with a child being able to access technology (whether an iPad, computer, etc.) are skills that are now valued – you won’t find a secretary position anywhere if you can’t type properly and accurately. A lot of companies are promoting online billing, paperless information, etc. and without the skills that technology provides, children will be unable to do these things as adults.

I have no problem with versing children in technology so long as that interaction is monitored and not the sole source of skill-learning and education.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by  cwedding14.
Post # 15
Member
2895 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I think introducing children to electronics at a younger age is a good idea.  At a young age, what I say goes.  I can teach them how to responsibly use these tools, and take them away when I wish to.  If you wait until they are older (14, 15, 16) you get into the age range where all children think they are smarter than their parents.  Any warnings that you give at that time will start to fall on deaf ears as they get to the “what do my parents know” range.    Now will they get their own iPhone, no.  But will they be able to use mine to help us navigate on a family vacation the same way I used a map in the back seat when we were on vacation when I was younger, yes. 

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