Work politics

posted 2 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
1987 posts
Buzzing bee

Yikes, that doesn’t sound good! What are some examples of what’s stressing you out so much? Is there someone you can go to in order to rectify the problems–like HR? Sorry you are having to deal with such a terrible workplace environment! ::HUGS::

Post # 4
Member
1987 posts
Buzzing bee

kitty_cupcake:  Oh, my gosh–that’s terrible! What a nasty enviornment to have to be in every day! I wouldn’t worry about potential employers calling and spilling the beans about you tryin to leave–most potential employers understand if you tell them that they cannot contact your current work place during the interview process in order to keep your possible resignation confidential. I’ve had to ask that a few times when applying for different teaching positions, and everyone has always respected that. I will cross my fingers for you and keep you in my thoughts that you’re able to get out of there as soon as possible. I can’t imagine the stress and anxiety you must feel having to go there every morning!

Post # 7
Member
584 posts
Busy bee

Sounds like my last job. It was awful, as in cry all the way to work every day awful. Monday mornings made me physically ill as I never knew how I would make it through the week! I became so fed up that I started applying for literally any job after a terrifying appointment with my doctor who said that I will continue to gain weight and not be able to lose it due to the amount of stress hormones in my body. I suddenly realized I could not continue to put my health in jeopardy. Starting my new job had been so amazing! It took me 3 months to really get used to it and calm down and start getting healthy again. I had to constantly remind myself to untense my body and breath slower.

I really, really urge you to get out there and start applying for almost anything and go on interviews, etc. It really helped me just to have some hope. It took me over a year to find a new job, but that last year was mildly better just because I was making some effort to get a new job. I also went to therapy, which I strongly recommend.

Good luck!!!

Post # 9
Member
916 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

Yes, me.

Tomorrow I am getting bloodwork done/pre-hire physical done, and then I am hired at a new place (hospital). 

I am taking a 50% pay cut (per hour) but the stable money (I was per diem in my last job, part-time at this new one) and less stress is worth it to me.

There is no amount of pay that is worth mental anguish, depression, and physical illness.  Not to me, anyway.

——-

edit: I’m in the NYC area too.  I couldn’t give any job prospects my current employer for a reference, as there was a risk he would bomb the interview for me – my company hires per-diem employees to “cover” their manager’s shifts… so of course he wouldn’t want me going anywhere else!  I gave them my old supervisor who 1) loved me and 2) couldn’t stand that company as much as me, and left himself.

Post # 12
Member
1016 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

What I do to cope is leave. ASAP. No amount of money is worth that to me!

I value money below almost everything else though haha, so it might be easier for me to say “fuck it, I’m out” knowing I can pick up cash work easily. 

Post # 13
Member
1158 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

kitty_cupcake:  yes, anywhere you go there will always be issues and things you don’t like, but um, I’m going to go ahead and say that NO anywhere you go will not be like where you are now. I’ve had many office jobs and never witnessed anything that overtly abusive or vindictive, nor have I heard about anything that bead from any friends.

That said, I definitely had my fill of office “politics” and basically just any and all of the crap that comes with not being in control of your own time and space on a day to day basis. I still hear about it constantly from my friends. My solution was to become an independent consultant/freelancer and now I make my own hours and work from home, the beach, the rooftop deck at a nearby hotel, starbucks, you name it, far away from any politics, assholes, vindictive pricks or just plain annoying people that I would not spend a single second with outside the confines of salaried work.

I cannot put into words what this has done for my daily psyche, attitude, and even physical health!

Now I know this isn’t for everyone – it requires a certain personality, industry, local market, all kinds of things, and I admittedly had the luxury of my husband to support me until I found my own clients. So if that’s not really an option for you, I would highly encourage you to reach out to recruiters who work with people in your area/field or to just start applying elsewhere.

At the very least start attending industry or networking events, put feelers out with former bosses, clients or coworkers, etc. Basically, given this is such a small and privately held company (and without an HR dept) I think it’s HIGHLY unlikely that there is anything you can say or do to improve this situation from within. So I think think a different position is your best solution.

It is NOT just you and NOT like this everywhere. Life is too short and the human mind and body too negatively impacted when exposed to too much stress hormones for you to live this way day in and day out. 

Post # 15
Member
1158 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

kitty_cupcake:  I see, the degree thing would worry me too but honestly with 10 years experience, I think you should go ahead and apply. Many postings say “degree OR equivalent work experience” and even if they don’t, you will find that your experience will make up for it. Employers include this language to weed out super green, inexperienced AND uneducated people. If you had no experience then I would say yeah, sorry, you need the degree…but that’s not the case.

don’t let specifics like discourage you when you are looking for new jobs – people are describing their absolute super ideal candidate when they write the post. They are trying to minimize the complete non viable applicants and maximize the number that have at least some potential to save themselves time – it doesn’t necessarily mean they ONLY will consider candidates who meet every single tiny thing listed.  If you don’t fit it to the absolute letter but genuinely feel that you would be qualified and able to perform the job and add real value, apply anyway. That said, if it’s a BIG thing lacking – like it says you must have managed a team but you’ve never even managed an assistant, then yeah, don’t apply. But don’t get tripped up on details. It can’t hurt to try and you won’t know until you give it a shot.

Also, this is why recruiters, networking and reaching out to personal contacts is so important. A personal recommendation coupled with a decade of experience would almost surely trump a degree requirement (unless its a job where certain schooling and licensure are required, like law, medicine, etc of course -but that does not appear to apply here). I was able to help a friend get a job in a field where no one without a degree was typically even interviewed at all. She hadn’t finished her degree either but she had 4 years or experience and my recommendation. 

You can also include that you have plans to finish your degree (part time, while working, if that is your plan) in spring 2015, finishing _____ to ensure your continued growth in the field so they know you will have a degree within a certain amount of time. 

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