(Closed) Would you give your child a name from a different culture/background?

posted 5 years ago in Names
  • poll: Would you give your child a name from a different culture then your family's?
    Yes : (110 votes)
    67 %
    No : (55 votes)
    33 %
  • Post # 3
    Hostess
    3381 posts
    Sugar bee

    My cousin and her husband chose the name Isaac for their son and my Grandmother’s friends started asking if her husband was Jewish.  He’s not.  My Grandmother wasn’t taken aback by these comments it was more of “Of course I had to explain to Gladys that they’re not Jewish”. So I definitely wouldn’t choose anything that was extreme because apparently Isaac is too far out! Lol.

    Post # 4
    Member
    9553 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: May 2018

    I would give my child a name I liked that I and FI thought suited him/her, regardless of what cultural background it came from. 

    Post # 5
    Member
    838 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @cirk:  The Italian pronunciation is more JYAH-dah, but the ee sound she’s wanting to use is definitely in line with that pronunciation. 

    I don’t think there’s anything weird about it. There are plenty of names out there that were at one point associated with one culture over another but are now used very widely. 

    Post # 6
    Member
    1786 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    If I really loved the name, I probably would.

    Post # 7
    Member
    9553 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: May 2018

    @ellisrobertson:  yes, my name ‘Jacqueline’ is originally French but is now widely used across the world, and I am not French

    Post # 8
    Member
    838 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @Jacqui90:  I’m an Erin. 🙂 Pretty specific in origin. 

    Post # 10
    Member
    838 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @cirk:  🙂 I understand. I had a coworker whose grandson was named Giovanni. I agree that there are names that “scream” one thing or another. Like Guido or Madeline or…my brain is too tired for more examples! I understand that it seems unusual at first, but it’s easy to get used to a name when it stops being an abstract and starts being about the person it’s attached to.

    My fiancé’s son’s name is Sebastian. I think it is the most pretentious name they could have given the kid short of Reginald Harvey Joseph Harold Erickson III. I seriously hate it. But after a while, it just became a series of sounds used to express my frustration with him 😉 I’m kidding, but really, it’s stopped being so grating / jarring and just became part of who he is. 

    Post # 11
    Member
    587 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

    I would pick a name from a different culture but it would have to be a name that’s pretty popular so that the first association isn’t the culture. Like, I wouldn’t name my kid Henrik (even though I love that name) bc that kid is definitely not going to be a Nordic hockey player.

    Post # 12
    Member
    393 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: April 2013

    I loved the name Jai. In Hindu it means victory/victorious. We are not Hindu but I love the name and the meaning so we named our second son Jai. Jai also has a Thai/Chinese meaning. First son was Jordan. Love that name too. Third son is Jared. Still getting used to that one (Daddys pick) 🙂

    If we ever had a girl, which probably not because whew, three boys are enough, I would consider Giada. Thats a nice name.. I might spell it with a J though..

    Post # 13
    Member
    7779 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

    I think it depends on how commonly accepted the name is. Like Issac, that’s acceptable name for anyone, IMO, because it’s a common boys name. Giada… that’s really, really Italian.

    Post # 14
    Member
    2335 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: November 2012

    No, but only because family names mean so much to me.  I don’t think its strange if other people do this though.

    Post # 15
    Member
    1096 posts
    Bumble bee

    I would if I loved the name! But the main criterion for me is that the name be pronounceable in both French and English (since we are bilingual living in Montreal) so that eliminates alot of names from other cultures…

    Post # 16
    Member
    4519 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2010

    @cirk:  I’m with you — I wouldn’t do it. And it’s too bad, because there are lots of names from other cultures that I LOVE — but IMO, it would just be weird.

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