Yes or No poll about Pets…..

posted 3 years ago in Pets
  • poll: Would you keep a violent pet around your family if you could not make it less aggressive?
    Yes : (16 votes)
    13 %
    No : (108 votes)
    87 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    539 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: February 2014

    Absolutely not.  A pet may be a lifetime commitment, but it’s still just an animal.  A human is more important,  eespecially a helpless infant.

    Post # 4
    Member
    6644 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    As a parent of a 2 year old as much as I love my cat, the cat would have to go if said cat was aggressive toward my child.  Which thankfully she is not, she doesn’t bother my child and generally ignores him. 

    Post # 5
    Member
    3598 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2011

    Nope.  My parents actually re-homed a dog that had started snapping at me by the time I was two.  

    Post # 6
    Member
    825 posts
    Busy bee

    Yes and No.

    If it were a bird/snake/cat/rabid pet moose I probably would rehome it. But there’s a wide range of behavioral dog trainers that work can work with your dogs before and after a child is born/enters your home. If working diligently with a trainer to improve the dog’s behavior didn’t work over ‘x’ amount of time, only then would I consider rehoming it. 

    Post # 7
    Member
    9412 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper

    I don’t believe any dog can’t be fixed by proper training. I don’t know anything about cats but I’d never have one. As for a dog, I wouldn’t get rid of him because he’d be trained. I’m actually in this situation and it’s exactly what I did. 

    As for not answering on the thread, what’s the point of a discussion forum where you don’t discuss? This isn’t survey monkey, people actually post comments here. That’s sort of the point 😛 

    Post # 8
    Member
    234 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

    @MrsPanda99:  I disagree. If I had a big dog and saw aggression in it, or if I still had my smaller dog but had a child as well, I would rehome it. I’ve known families that their dog ripped apart people/other dogs before – and they STILL didn’t rehome it. C’mon… a pet is just a pet. It’s not worth the risk 

    Post # 9
    Member
    9412 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper

    @sauerdragon:  Obviously I don’t think a pet is just a pet. As I said, I have a fear aggressive dog who has been completely rehabilitated through training. Yes, the easy route was getting rid of him before we had kids and finding a friendly dog. That’s not the kind of people we are – we made a commitment to our current dog and he was worth it. 

    I personally don’t believe any dog is hopeless, not worth the effort, or impossible to rehabilitate. I wouldn’t get rid of my dog any more than I’d get rid of a misbehaving kid. 

    Post # 10
    Member
    2576 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2013

    @Laulu123:  I am a huge believer in pets being a lifetime commitment and made it clear to DH that my cat and I were a package deal when we started dating. However, in your case, I also believe that pets are expected to behave themselves as I am providing them with a loving home. If they can’t even do that and behave violently towards me, DH, potential kids, and other pets, then I would rehome them. However, I would do my very best to rehome the pet at another household instead of immediately shipping it off to the shelter.

    Post # 11
    Member
    7285 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: November 1999

    Its a solid no for me. I dont give animals the same value as humans. 

    Post # 12
    Member
    671 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: March 2013

    I have a five year old and a baby on the way, there is no way I could have a violent pet. We have two dogs (lab/tick hound and German sheppherd), two fish, a guinea pig, and a cat. We love pjust and all of ours are the sweetest animals you could ask for

    Post # 13
    Member
    234 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

    @MrsPanda99:  Right, but during the training/rehabilitation, wouldn’t you seperate the dog from family (especially children)? I think my first step would be having my dog stay with my brother (who lives alone) or at least not let my dog alone with any children. You have an obligation to make sure the animal is provided for, but that doesn’t always mean the animal is a good fit for your home

    Post # 14
    Member
    234 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

    @bklynbridetobe:  THANK YOU! I don’t understand why people put the same value on dogs/cats as humans. To say your obligation to a pet is the same as to your child is really ridiculous in my opinion. Now, that doesn’t mean I don’t love my dog to death! Right now my dog is my everything and I’d do anything for him (don’t have kids btw), but at some point I know he’s still just a pet. 

    Post # 16
    Member
    11772 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: May 2013

    @MrsPanda99:  I had a friend growing up who rehabilitated former dog fighting dogs. I agree with you! With enough love, and a SERIOUSLY gifted trainer, it’s possible.

    I wish I could work through something like that, but I would always be terrified of my animal hurting my baby! So I would try to rehome the animal. Mostly because I couldn’t take adequate care of it and get it the help it needs.

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