1 embryo or 2?

posted 2 years ago in TTC
Post # 2
Member
2181 posts
Buzzing bee

I’m a big advocate for 1. It gives you the highest odds of success per embryo and singleton pregnancies are much safer for you and the baby than multiples. I also have heard enough stories about an embryo splitting and making twins that I’d be terrified that I’d end up with 3 if I transferred 2.

Utimately, it’s your choice, but most clinics are moving towards single transfers as the process improves and they have higher rates of successful implantation. The only exceptions I know of are for older moms or low quality embryos.

Post # 3
Member
671 posts
Busy bee

I just started my first ICSI. I’m set on having 2 blastos transfered (if possible, obv), because eSET is not legal in my country, and we are fine with twins anyway. 

Post # 4
Member
2157 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

I used to want twins before I started this process!  Now, less so. Honestly, I would definitley only do 1 embryo unless they are poor quality and your dr. recommends two. First, statistically, your chances are better if you only implant 1. Implanting 2 does not significantly increase your chances of success. In fact, you are much more likely to succeed if you do two separate transfers with 1 single embryo (assuming the first doesn’t take). Second, twins are hard! One of my friends got pregnant with twins during an IUI. They are having to uproot their entire lives to be close to family because it’s near impossible to do without help if you also need to work full time. They have spent a small fortune on baby items. There are much more health risks with twins than a singleton. If you implant 2 there is always the chance that one splits and then you have triplets. Are you prepared for that possibility? Most doctors are firmly in the school of elective single transfer unless you are older. 

Finally, do you know what your fertility issues are? Getting a good number of embryos is not as easy as it sounds, especially on a first retrieval. Before I started this process, I did not realize how many embryos get lost in the process. Not all that are retrieved will be mature, not all that were mature will fertilize (even with ICSI), not all that fertilized will make it to day 3, etc etc. You will likely end up with a small fraction of embryos compared to the # of eggs retrieved. I don’t mean to be a debbie downer but i wish i had understood that more going into the process so I could be prepared for that reality. Good luck!

Post # 5
Member
3582 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I would say 1, but it might not be your choice. In the Uk they won’t transfer more than one unless you are over a certain age or have had multiple failed rounds already. 

Post # 6
Member
4094 posts
Honey bee

I wouldn’t ever do more than one unless I’ve had several attempts that were unsuccessful or the doctor gave a legitimate reason for it. Quite frankly transferring more than one shouldn’t ever be up to the discretion of the patient alone, in my opinion. 

Post # 7
Member
8985 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

View original reply
n3wb33 :  I purposely picked a hospital with the policy of single embryo transfers so that I wouldn’t have to decide while on hormones lol. At my clinic you don’t get the option to put in 2 until you’ve had failed transfers (it’s a different # of failed rounds depending on over/under 35). Twins can be risky and honestly….the newborn stage it SO freaking hard that I never would have survived twins. We froze our extras to use for the future so that’s also something to consider. 

Post # 8
Member
4094 posts
Honey bee

A coworker of mine went through this. She transferred two, both split for a total of four babies! She ended up losing them all midway through her pregnancy. It was horrible. 

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larissakay :  

Post # 11
Member
3582 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Beware of that clinic. The HFEA guidelines would state only 1 at a time unless there is a reason.

there has been a lot recently about some private clinics ignoring the regulations and up selling to desperate couples. Did you see the story about the woman who faked her ex partner’s signature on the forms? 

I went through the process with the NHS (and some private appointments) and tbh I had a better and more honest experience with the NHS. A few people I met through the process felt the same. 

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n3wb33 :  

Post # 12
Member
1227 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2017

I have NO experience with IVF, so take this with a grain of salt. But I am 37 weeks pregnant with a singleton and I’ve had an incredibly easy, low risk pregnancy. But this is HARD with just one baby. I truly cannot fathom having multiple inside me. It would hurt like hell, I honestly don’t know how my body would do it

Post # 13
Member
2157 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

View original reply
n3wb33 :  While I understand that, your chances are success are greater if you transfer those embryos individually rather than both at once. If neither takes (I transferred two my first round and neither took), and you don’t have any any other embryos left, you are in a difficult position. If you only transfer 1 and it doesn’t take you still have another shot. I think given your issues, transferring only one gives you the best chance at success if there is possibility that you can’t retrieve any other sperm. 

Post # 15
Member
1128 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

We wanted to transfer both at once. (We only ended up with 2 embryos).

Our clinic talked us out of it and our first cycle failed. I was really upset because that was the better embryo and I thought we were completely out of luck.

We did the second transfer with the lesser quality, frozen embryo, and my beautiful boy turned 1 last month.

So based on my experience I would say do one at a time! That’s what my clinic recommended and they were right.

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