(Closed) Bilevels

posted 6 years ago in Home
Post # 3
Member
5494 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2011

By “bilevel” do you mean a house with more than one floor?  Or is there a different, maybe regional meaning?

Well, I live in LA.  I would say most homes around here that were built after the 70s, (and about 50% before), are two story homes.  Space is a huge premium here so most houses are built up instead of out.  Most people I know prefer a two story home just because they are more spacious and have higher ceilings typical.  All the houses I grew up in were two story.

Our house now is actually one story, (with high ceilings), and I like it.  But I would be totally fine with buying a two story home in the future.  I don’t see why it would be difficult to sell unless you were living in a community geared towards senior citizens.

Post # 6
Member
1327 posts
Bumble bee

So many types of different split levels.  There are “BC boxes” as we call them which is were you come in the front door and either go up the stairs to the kitchen/living/bedrooms or down the stairs the basement. Like so:

 You can also have ones were you step down the living room or up the kitchen then there are more stairs to the bedrooms and basements. Kind of endless options.

Personally I am not a fan of the BC boxes with the living/kitchen/bedrooms all on one level even though thats basically what I grew up in, but the other styles of split levels can be very nice.

Post # 7
Member
5494 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2011

Ah ok I understand. Here in the US they’re called split level.  I lived in a house like this in HS.  The only difference being there was no basement. the entry to the house was just between the first and second floors and the bedrooms were downstairs and the living areas were upstairs.  

I would say that I don’t see a major problem with split level homes, (although there are not many around here).  My only issue would be the noise level in the bedrooms if the upstairs livings areas had wood flooring.  So if I found a split level with the living areas down stairs I wouldn’t even give it a second thought.

Post # 8
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

I’ve lived in two split level homes. The only downside is that the stairs may be difficult for elderly people.  That was the problem we ran into with my grandma, so we always ended up getting together at her house without  those  initial stairs.  It might also be hard with small children.

Post # 9
Member
5479 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

We have a tri-level home… so when you walk in you are on the main level, with the living room & kitchen.  Then you can go down a half flight of stairs to the den and the laundry room, or up a half flight of stairs to the bedrooms.  I like it, but I think if it were set up with a split-foyer I’d probably like it less.  Hey- I’m lazy- sometimes I don’t wanna hike up or down any stairs when I get home from work!

Post # 11
Member
4046 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

When we were looking for a house, we discarded all split levels from our search. Fh grew up in one and hated it. His parent’s house has this weird feeling where you can be upstairs but everyone in the dowmstairs can see you moving about inthe hallway.  Even though its a big house it always feels like everyone is right next to everyone else.I really hate it. Hate ranches too, for the same reason. I prefer the bedrooms to be up and out of the way.

Post # 12
Member
5761 posts
Bee Keeper

Mt daughter has a bilevel and my sister has a split, and the common denominator for both is really tiny kitchens. Room size wise, my daughter’s is much larger in a bilevel than the split.

Since many people these days want huge,open and luxurious kitchens, I can see why those styles may not be very popular, but they’re great for first time buyers!

Post # 13
Member
4371 posts
Honey bee

I dislike the split level homes. Something very off about the feng shui in them to me (and I don’t really even believe in it). Just seems like an awkward set-up and seems cramped.

Post # 14
Member
2233 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

My parents have a split townhouse, it’s extremely roomy and most people can’t believe how bit it is once they’re inside. It all depends on layout! The only thing I hate about it is the noise from the kitchen travels to the living room because it’s all open to each other.

Personally, I like splits (side splits more than back splits) and I’m not a big fan of 2 story homes. Typically those types of homes are built on much bigger lots so you do get just as much space as 2 story homes which are  typically newer builds (in most parts of Canada). For a split or bungalow builders need wider lots, which means they build fewer houses which equals less profit. On the other hand 2 story homes take up less space which means more money for them.

Post # 15
Member
1811 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

I’ve seen some split level houses done pretty well, but personally they wouldn’t work for me.  We want a big family and the thought of all those baby gates or carrying laundry up and down was enough to cut them out of our search.

Post # 16
Member
2106 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

In the US, if you walk in and can go up or downstairs from the foyer, it’s actually called a split foyer. If it has 3 different elevations with shorter stairs, it’s a split level. 

They tend to be harder to sell than a colonial in my area. They often lack bonus features like tall ceilings. We don’t like them because you feel like you have to take stairs to get everywhere. I loved in one until I was 5 and much prefer colonials. 

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