(Closed) A legal wedding with a jewish twist

posted 8 years ago in Jewish
Post # 3
Bee
2362 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - New York Botanical Garden

Your civil officiant can do his/her part, finish, and then your rabbi can come up and do the seven blessings and you can break the glass?  I definitely suggest the book “the new jewish wedding” by Anita Diamant for a breakdown of Jewish wedding traditions, and then you can talk to your rabbi and see what he feels comfortable doing.

Post # 5
Bee
2362 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - New York Botanical Garden

Oh a chuppah would be a great and really easy Jewish tradition to incorporate!  We are having friends read the seven blessings too, maybe you can work on a ketubah with your rabbi and he can read it?  I don’t think there will be awkward silence – maybe during the transition, you can have a friend read a non-religious poem, just enough time for the switch? good luck, sounds interesting!

Post # 8
Member
3316 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

Ours was literally popup.  It worked sort of like an umbrella.  It started out like this:

However, I can understand not wanting to pause the ceremony for long enough to pop it up.

Another question:  do the civil and religious ceremonies need to be at the same time and place?  Or could you just have a private civil ceremony, then have the rabbi conduct a normal Jewish ceremony in front of family and friends?

Post # 10
Member
605 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

We are having a Justice of the Peace ceremony but incorporating a couple of Jewish traditions (chuppah, and stomping glass). We plan to have the Justice of the Peace explain these briefly as part of the ceremony. (FI’s family is Jewish on his mom’s side.) The chuppah is one my friend made for her wedding. It’s actually an Indian silk sari stretched between gold-painted wooden dowels (broom handles would work too).

Post # 12
Member
605 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

@ hesmywatermelon: No problem. Ask away! I didn’t actually build the Chuppah, so I don’t know all the particulars, but it was a silk sari, modified to tie to a 4 poles in the corners, much like the sample you showed. The poles were purchased at a hardware store and spray-painted gold. I don’t think there was anything between them other than fabric. Here’s a picture of it in action. Friends stood in 4 corners and held it over the couple during the ceremony. (I’m the one in pink and I’m sitting because I broke my foot.)

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