Abnormal ECG, anyone know what this could mean?

posted 6 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
1849 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

It could be anything. A pap looks at cell morphology, while an ECG looks at the electrical wave that spreads through your heart when it beats, so they’re not exactly the same. An abnormal ECG could be dozens of things from a minor arrhythmia due to nervousness or caffeine to a major one due to real problems with the conduction system of the heart. It might not even be about an arrhythmia at all, but rather about the elecrical axis of your heart or the form of the waves. I work with ECGs all the time in a non-clinical setting, and they can come in many forms. If nothing was said at the time, you shouldn’t worry about it. A real problem would have been addressed immediately, since people take the heart pretty seriously. 

ETA: normal sinus rhythm is good, that rules out some of the most serious causes for abnormal ECG

Post # 5
Member
1849 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@kris325:  Normal sinus rhythm actually means a normal regular heart rate, but perhaps you had a couple moments where your heart “skipped a beat”, which shows up on the ECG as an extra wave and is fairly common and non-threatening. 

Post # 6
Member
1849 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@kris325:  No problem ๐Ÿ™‚

Post # 8
Member
1849 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@kris325:  Interesting! Since I can’t actually see your ECG output, it’s really hard to know what was going on from descriptions, but if none of these practitioners expressed serious worry, it’s probably minor. I have a student who has a very noticeable arrhythmia that I can plainly see on his ECG, and he says his doctor is fully aware of it and checks it every time, but no one is too concerned, so it could be that type of situation.

A normal sinus rhythms means your atria are contracting regularly in response to the SA (sinus) node, which sets the pace for your heart beat. But ventricles can sometimes contract on their own without the atria contracting, which can make you feel like your heart skipped a beat, but still qualifies as normal sinus rhythm. This is something that could happen due to caffeine and stress. Either way, I’m sure you’re fine ๐Ÿ™‚ 

Post # 10
Member
4324 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 1992

I have one with an innocent heart murmur, do you know if you have one?

Post # 12
Member
1772 posts
Buzzing bee

Part of the work up for seizures is to make sure that the heart is pumping normally – getting enough blood to your brain.  If for some reason your brain doesn’t get enough blood it could cause a seizure.  

Post # 14
Member
1849 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@kris325:  In addition to the other suggestion, this also makes me wonder if a seizure shows up as an electrical artifact on your ECG, kind of like a little bit of radio interference. I haven’t heard of it specifically, but I know many things can cause a bit of interference. Anyway, interesting stuff! 

@StuporDuck:  A murmur is actually a sound that occurs when a valve doesn’t shut all the way and blood leaks through when it’s not supposed to, so it would be noticeable through a stethoscope or during an Echo, but not through an ECG ๐Ÿ™‚

Post # 15
Member
43 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2013

The question you need to ask your cardiologist is how high is the infraction, this can possibly brought by a recent MI (myocardial infraction or heart attract) if the infraction is high it will be a recent, and if it is low it was due to an old infraction. Seizures can also brought this up, I suggest that you see a cardiologist in conjunction with your neurologist, you might be having a partial MI while having seizures. 

Post # 16
Member
1849 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@Charlotte2013:  Whoa! I don’t think there’s any chance that these practitioners saw any sign of a myocardial infarction* and didn’t say anything. Your conclusions are very extreme and sound totally unfounded. 

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