Accomplishments instead of duties to CV

posted 1 week ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
2286 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I’m a recruiter and completely agree that you should look at achievements rather than duties.

 

so ‘serving customers’ becomes ‘maintained high standards of customer service’ 

 

Post # 3
Member
3600 posts
Sugar bee

For sure achievements over duties.  Anyone can call up your HR department and ask for your position description – they don’t need you for that.  Your resume is an advertisement selling yourself.

If you can’t think of achievements, I would start looking at your annual reviews and see what you were being measured on if it wasn’t quantifiable numbers and what comments they wrote.

Post # 5
Member
3600 posts
Sugar bee

No one in your workplace has ever provided you with feedback on your work ever?  Even informally?  You don’t have a mission statement or a set of standards or values for which your company stands for?  You aren’t expected to be courteous or accurate?  You’ve never done anything at work that shows you have initiative or creativity or leadership skills or you manage your workload well?  So basically you could show up and fuck around all day and not accomplish anything and they are cool and you’d still get paid?  And more importantly, are they hiring?

I would start looking at your organization’s mission statement and evaluate how you contribute and anything you’ve done above and beyond the bare minimum requirements.  And if you haven’t done anything but meet the minimum requirements, then I would find ways to phrase those as accomplishments. So for example if you had to maintain a caseload of insurance clients. Instead of processed insurance claims it would be efficiently maintained a caseload of 100 insurance claims meeting production and quality standards

Post # 7
Member
586 posts
Busy bee

Maybe try and be a bit more descriptive about what you do (and do well) on a day to day basis – or highlight any particularly good things you’ve done i.e, implemented a new procedure / filing system), won a new contract that was proving elusive, saved the company £x by doing x/y/z, earned the most commission in that year, managed a particularly difficult project, managed a team of x people to do y project amidst z challenges

make it real and INTERESTING for someone reading it. I would get so bored reading lists of job duties. 

Post # 8
Member
2438 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2021

I would highly recommend seeking the services of a career advisor on this. They can help you figure out the best ways to word things on your resume and what to focus on. 

I agree with the others that you should use value-oriented words rather than descriptive.

Post # 9
Member
6035 posts
Bee Keeper

rez123 :  can you quantify anything? Instead of “processed orders in a timely manner” something like “accurately and efficiently processed 30 orders per day” or whatever it is. 

Post # 10
Member
1192 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

Permission to hijack your thread, OP. I have a question about CVs as well.

I used to be a professor in Brazil (where scholars use an online standardized platform to write/update their CVs). I’m currently translating my CV to English and I could use some guidance.

Should a professor CV also focus on achievements? Professor / recruiter bees, can you please help me with guidelines and suggestions?

Post # 11
Member
2329 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

lifetimegoals :  Former HR Manager here. Some things I look for in a CV/Resume:

Intro: name, contact info, objective, summary of skills/experience (1-3 sentences) 

Work History/Experience: Job title, employer, dates; accomplishments/experience (not daily tasks), repeat as needed**

Certifications/Skills: List certifications/licenses/course training, and completion date (expiration date if applicable) and program/software skills (QB, Sage, MS Office, Adobe, etc.)

References: 1-2 professional references, 1-2 personal references 

Keep it on ONE page unless you have LOTS of years of experience in various fileds, numerous degrees, etc. all applicable to the job you’re applying for now. List jobs and certifications in chronological order, most recent first. 

**If your work history is mostly the same job/duties, you can list the accomplishments/experience first, then list the jobs/dates just under it. EX: a pre-school teacher who went from part-time TA, to full-time TA, to full-time teacher, switched from public to private school, etc. You don’t need to list the same items under each job. Good luck! 

Post # 12
Member
1192 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

Miss-Mauverick :  Thank you so much for your valuable feedback!

May I please message you inbox?

Post # 14
Member
2329 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

lifetimegoals :  Yes, of course! I’m happy to help. 

rez123 :  It’s not the end of the world to include “tasks” instead of “accomplishments” on your CV. If you’re struggling to fill the space, then by all means, include your duties/responsibilites. Maybe start with a few achievements, then segue into the tasks. If possible, start with the items that have the most relevance to the job you’re applying for. When you have an interview, you can explain the nature of your current/former job in person since it seems a bit complicated to put on paper. Just be honest and concise when explaining it. Good luck! 

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