Accounting? Associates vs. Bach? Take a semester off? Low stress job?

posted 2 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
1704 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

My sister just graduated and is an introvert and she loves herher off/cubicle job. My Fiance minored in accounting, but has never worked directed in the field. His major was Computer Science so he liases between the software engineers and accounting teams so they can work together :). I think with an actual.accounting style job, you need a Bachelors. Here’s the deal though, I’ve heard there’s a glut of accountants out there, so it may not be the best field. It’s still better than my degree though(BA in English lol). Maybe try an internship if you can find the time. You might also look into a temp agency and see if you can get a job with your current credentials and go to school in the evenings. I’m also.omtroverted, but I didn’t mind working as a receptionist. It’s not that bad.

Post # 3
Member
1386 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2017

I am an accountant. It really is a stable job (accountants are always needed!) and you make decent money. I went to a public university, started off majoring in business. To get a bachelor’s in business admin you have to take an introductory accounting course. You should most definitely start off taking one. My teacher told us that if you don’t understand the basics of accounting then you won’t get it. For me, the intro course came very easy-we actually had intro to accounting I & II. Financial accounting is when it starts to get hard and it makes or breaks you. My BS is in business admin with a focus on accounting. I got a job a month after graduating.

I would most definitely advise a bachelor’s for accounting. You could get a bookkeeping job but it isn’t going to pay high money. In my area $20-30k maybe.

I work for a company, so I’m not doing people’s taxes or anything (but if you are interested in public accounting they make very good money, but it’s pretty stressful, I did an internship at a firm). It is ALOT of excel. I was bad at pre-cal & all the math after that and I do just fine with accounting.

Post # 4
Member
779 posts
Busy bee

To make decent money in accounting, you need at least a bachelor’s, and then you will likely be encouraged by your firm to be studying for the CPA test as well as a few other certifications, which can be very stressful and means that you will be studying a lot at home on your own time. It’s a long road, but can be lucrative.

If you work for an accounting firm, not in-house at a business, you will also not have a typical 8-5pm job. Accounting is often either very busy or very slow. Certain months you will have little to do and be out of there by 5. During the busy seasons, you will be working long hours. I had a friend at a big 4 firm that would sleep under her desk 3 nights per week for weeks at a time before the April and September deadlines.

All of this to say, take that intro class and talk to your professor. Ask what life is really like, the raise and promotion schedule, etc.

Post # 5
Member
731 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

View original reply
blueberrycupcake28 :  It sounds like you have a good head on your shoulders, know yourself really well, and have done a lot of thinking and researching about this, so kudos! I agree with you that as an introvert a steady office job, especially in accounting, would be great for you.

I would like to counter what pp’s are saying about education. Unless your goal is specifically to become an accountant, you don’t need an advanced degree or to become a CPA. Most mid-sized and up companies, across all industries, have a finance department with specific jobs in accounting relating positions like accounts payable, payroll, benefits, etc. For example, I work in a creative company but we have a whole finance department with accounts payable specialists, and none of them are CPA’s, and I’m pretty sure that most of them do not have advanced degrees.

I actually think the fact that you want a job in accounting is a huge plus for you because a lot of young people consider that to be a more “boring” career path, so there isn’t as much competition the way a job that’s considered more “cool” and “fun” would be. I think you would be best off completing a B.S. program in accounting or finance. I do know people who only have Associates degrees and still got jobs they liked and did well in their careers. Best of luck to you!

Post # 6
Member
2019 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

Coming from an older bee who wishes she would’ve gotten into a career she’d actually enjoy, I’ll come at you from a “if you love what you do its not work” perspective.   Are you simply looking for more pay or do you want a career in something you love?  I’d start with figuring out what you’re already good at or what you’re personal interests are.  What do you like?  What totally fascinates you?  Look into what kind of careers can be made from that.  Any CC offers exploratory courses in so many career directions.  I’d check that out if I were you.

Post # 7
Member
1266 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

View original reply
sablescorpion22 :  Coming from a different perspective, ~30 year old bee here–I think that your viewpoint is valuable and valid, but I also thing that the advice “do what you love” without considering practicalities isn’t always that helpful, especially for people who saw what happened during the recession. I’ve seen a lot of people get degrees in what they love that didn’t immediately translate into jobs or careers (e.g. BA in English, BA in History, BA in Fine Arts). I’m definitely not saying that those subjects or degrees aren’t worthwhile (they are!), but it is a good and practical to consider what a degree can get you in the context of what type of a career would make you feel happy, secure, and get you what you want in life. 

The other thing is–some people (myself included), love so many different subjects that it’s really hard to choose a field. I am currently in science/medicine, but I could have seen myself go down the political science route or the engineering route and been happy in both fields. My DH is totally different and only ever saw himself in one career path, but when you have varied interests and things that excite you it’s hard to make a decision!

Post # 8
Member
3176 posts
Sugar bee

I think it’ll be a good idea to take Intro to Accounting. I worked for a CPA as a bookkeeper for three years. My job was very 8-5, except for tax season since he is a tax accountant. During the busy season, I typically pulled in 50-55 horus a week.  I do think that you’ll need a bachelor’s degree to really get into accounting though. The person before me in the bookkeeping position had an AA in Accounting. Stress levels really depends on what kind of accounting you do, and where you end up working too.My best friend is an internal auditor for a big company. She works a ton and her job is stressful, but she enjoys it. 

Post # 9
Member
1266 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

View original reply
blueberrycupcake28 :  Accounting can be very stressful, before big deadlines. My friend’s Fiance is an accountant, and his work and stress level definitely picks up in the weeks leading up to April. 

Might be too late to ask this, but I’ll go ahead anyway–since you like math and don’t mind working with computers, have you thought about engineering and/or computer science?

As far as taking a semester off–don’t feel bad. Many people off college late like you, I did and I also had to take time off. You are still young and have so may options ahead of you, don’t let yourself feel anything bad.

You are working hard and improving your life. You are making the best choices for yourself so that you can have a secure and happy future. That is what is important.

I can’t tell you whether to take the semester off or not, but do what is best for you. Taking time off isn’t shameful, especially if it helps you figure things out. Just make sure you come back to school and finish, because you deserve to have the career you want.

Post # 10
Member
955 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Others can advise on accounting more than me, but I wanted to throw this out there – can you transfer yoru skills into a job that involves accounting yet does not need a degree? Such as night auditor at a hotel? Doing something like that would also help land a different “professional” job one day too.

Post # 11
Member
651 posts
Busy bee

How I see it after 6 years of college. One A.S. and a B.S. Physics… 

I was so so tired of school. But today, I am not entirely sure how much I even care to resume the search for a job in my field. I have been done for 5 years this May. I decided I had no desire to continue to grad school which would actually lead to a job. 

I think you should maybe get an A.S. in a field you would enjoy and take as much time as you want! I did my A.S. in 3! Take a semester off but just one if you do. That way you take a break but you don’t lose that fresh brain if that makes sense? lol.

I Ironically went and got one of the toughest degrees out there and instead now work in health insurance (I work with a lot of reporting in excel/acess). It is dead 9 months out of the year and I work at home two days a week. So I can’t complain! Goal is to get into underwriting so my degree is still used. Now…I don’t make a lot. But I was still able to support myself, buy a house, live comfortably as a single person. So I think that that is even more manageable with a SO. 

College was stressful and very hard for me because of outside issues. So my grades were subpar and I got burnt out fast (probably why I stopped at B.S.) So if you need a break. Take it.

Post # 13
Member
1386 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2017

View original reply
blueberrycupcake28 :  Also want to add something to your recent update. You could work for a non-profit. I was called for a position at a non-profit that helps out homeless in our community. Unfortunately I was under contract at my job and couldn’t switch jobs but I have seen several accounting positions open at non profits.

Was accouting my first choice? No, I love politcial science and would have truly been so happy to get a job in that field. But it’s so hard to come by. Having a job you love is AWESOME but your job also needs to pay the bills! And accounting does that. PM me if you have anyquestions!

Post # 14
Member
2503 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

I worked in food service as a shift manager for 6 years and all through my college years. I am not in accounting but I am in HR (maybe something to consider!). I would highly recommend pursuing a bachlelors at a minimum. Accounting can be a great career but as others mentioned the hours can be varied and at times extremely grueling depending on what type of account/where you work. I would at a minimum take the account intro class and if HR sounds interesting maybe take an intro to HR class too and weigh your options. 

Post # 15
Member
395 posts
Helper bee

Commenting to follow. Can totally relate to your quandry, bee. Unfortunately I do not have a lot of advice. I do have a degree but have struggled to find a job I love or even like, and most of my jobs have had me stuck in some type of customer service role. Even a couple steps above entry level I was dealing with customers all day long and would throw up before going into work a lot of days from the stress.

At this point, all I want is an office job close-ish to home where I can do stuff like input data or prepare mailers. I also have really bad anxiety which is triggered by driving. Hugs and I wish you luck! Interested to see what the Bees have to say. 

Also: Have you tried temp-ing or thought about starting a blog or learning to program? These are things I’m looking into on the advice of my more introverted friends. 

Leave a comment


Find Amazing Vendors