(Closed) acknowledging the chuppah in a secular wedding

posted 6 years ago in Secular
Post # 3
Member
4464 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

I’m unsure of what you mean about acknowledging it? Do you mean that you’re going to get married under the chupah and then say a few explanatory words about it? 

Post # 4
Member
5547 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

If you have a program I might put a short paragraph about what the significance of it is in there. Since I’m not totally sure exactly what that actually IS, I’m not much help on where saying something in the ceremony would fit best.

Post # 6
Member
672 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I’m having a Jewish wedding (although interfaith as Fiance is not Jewish) and put a sentence about each Jewish tradition in my program so FI’s family will understand everything going on. For the Chuppah, I put:

The wedding ceremony takes place under the chuppah, a canopy supported by four poles. The chuppah symbolizes the new home that Candice and Brandon will create as husband and wife.

Post # 7
Member
1095 posts
Bumble bee

@star_dust:  I second this. Do you mean you will get married under a chuppah? In which case, I’ve seen it done is secular weddings before… it was nice

Post # 9
Member
5494 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2011

I would just put a blurb in your ceremony program about what the chuppah symbolizes.  We had an interfaith wedding, (i’m jewish and Darling Husband and Catholic), so we made sure to explain the various little rituations and sumbolism in the program.

Post # 10
Member
5494 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2011

Our Rabbi explained that the chuppah symbolizes the home we will build together. The four sides are completely open to symbolize that our home and our herts will always be open to our families and friends.

Post # 11
Member
4193 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: July 2012 - Baltimore Museum of Industry

I’ve been to three interfaith weddings, and I don’t believe any mention was made of the chuppah- it was “just there.” 🙂  Not sure what you’re trying to do- does Candicemh7’s answer work? Will your Fiance also be breaking the glass?  

Post # 12
Member
1416 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

We’re having a secular wedding, but since I was raised Jewish by culture, I always wanted a chuppah, mostly just because they’re pretty. I also am writing our ceremony and will include a sentence or two about the symbolism (will also include a sentence or two about carrying evil eyes on the bouquets for his Turkish mother!). The way I’ve always had chuppahs describe to me that I found nice is this:

Back in the “old days”, people used to live with their families until they got married and moved away from home. When a child was born, the family would plant a tree in their backyard. Because people also didn’t move around as often, the tree would be there and mostly grown when the bride and groom grew up and got married. Each family would take a branch from the bride’s tree and a branch from the groom’s tree and tie them together to form the chuppah, symbolizing their moving away from home and starting their own family tree together.

You don’t even have to technically mention Judaism at all unless you want to, you can just talk about it as a beautiful symbol in general, there actually isn’t really any RELIGIOUS significance to it in that sense 🙂

Post # 13
Member
3569 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I think most people know what chuppah is, I been to a few jewish weddings and never heard anyone say anything about it? But perhaps that was because both bride and groom were jewish. Maybe working a few lines into your intro stating why it’s important for your Fi to get married under a chuppah

Post # 14
Member
4046 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Monkey786:  This is great. I went to a Jewish wedding omce and they didn’t explain anything. You could tell there were a lot fo symbolism but they didn’t explain any of it.

Post # 15
Member
1629 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@BookishBelle:  This is correct…it’s culturally so common it seems religious almost but it really isn’t a religious thing at all (you don’t need one to have an orthodox wedding even).

I’d just introduce it early on: it symbolizes the home you are making, it is open on the 4 sides because it’s symbolic of being open to all the guests, all those who will join your family in the future, and you will leave your home open to those in need (that part reflects the biblical story that Abraham kept his tent open always so anyone in need would see they were welcomed in). If your parents are joining you under the chuppah (as is the tradition) it is to symbolize this is a marriage of 2 families, not just 2 individuals

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