(Closed) Adoption and the Foster System

posted 6 years ago in Babies
Post # 5
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I can’t speak for all countries, but I know that (lacking a better term) newborn adoption is a very competitive market. Parents will work with and pay a private agency to negotiate an adoption with a mother who is surrendering her child. It’s babies who are surrendered to a place like a hospital or police department that becomes a ward of the state.

Post # 7
Member
899 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@zippylef:  Good link. 

The foster care system is complicated and overloaded with non-newborns waiting to be adopted. Also, there is also no universal/national adoption system. Each agency has it’s own costs, rules, processes, etc. It can be extremely complicated.

Many parents want healthy newborns of their same race and are willing to wait for one. They choose to go through adoption agencies rather than through the foster system. This increases wait time. 

My Future Sister-In-Law and her husband have adopted two children. One white (their race) and one black. They adopted them from different agencies (in different states). There is a limit of two adopted childen for the particular agency in the area, so they are adopting from out of state. They have been on a wait list for one and a half years. 

I think it is true that if you decide to have a baby and are certain you want to put it up for adoption, the baby will be adopted quickly. I’m sure the decision to put up a baby for adoption is complicated and emotional. I think the issue comes when a birth parent is unsure, tries to raise the baby but then realizes she can’t so the baby goes into the foster system. 

 

 

 

Post # 9
Member
2239 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@AB Bride:  Usually newborns are adopted pretty quickly, especially (not saying this to be offensive, it’s true) if the baby is white. One thing a lot of people don’t realize is how much private adoption agencies profit off of the adoptions of newborns. Another thing people don’t realize is that often if a woman even is thinking about adoption and goes to an adoption agency to ask questions, the agency will pretty much do its best to coerce her into choosing adoption through some sketchy methods most of which designed to make her think she’s not good enough for her baby.

Post # 10
Member
7779 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

@AB Bride:  Yeah, I know it isn’t the best source because it is one organization but it was one of the only ones I could find that actually talked about the number of infants vs. number of prospective parents.

I think also, some babies are left as wards of the state because of circumstances beyond their control. For example, babies born addicted to drugs or HIV positive or born with developmental/physical disabilities. I did see a few articles in regards to this.

Post # 11
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@AB Bride:  Yes, and don’t take this is fact (because I’m not totally sure) but I think if a mother does “abandon” her infant, she is able to take steps within a certain time frame to retrieve her child. There is a ton of red take to sort out in these situations involving infants and foster care.

Other than some adoption agencies who stand to make a profit, most would agree that even if not ideal, it’s preferable for the baby to stay with one of the birth parents or a nearby relative before going into the system.

Post # 12
Member
899 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@KatyElle: I would think that is true also.

A lot of parents choose to go through private agencies becuase it is much more likely to know the medical history of the infant and get a healthy child. Whereas the foster care system might have little to no accurate medical history for the infant.  

Post # 13
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@Crabbabs:  I’m scurrying to research, but I believe this is accurate. I think there is a misconception that unwanted pregnancy automatically results in babies being in foster care, and it’s just not that simple. There will always be children in the system, but how they end up there is completely circumstantial, and I find it hard to believe that there would be any kind of drastic influx due to unwanted pregnancy. Parents falling victim to substance abuse problems, losing their home, sexual abuse, physical abuse, even death would be my immediate guess. Many many factors.

Post # 14
Member
7431 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2009

If fertility treatment is covered under health insurance, why not cover adoption? Or regulate the diffferent agencies? I always thought it was better for people who want a child but are infertile to spend their money on adoption instead of fertility treatment, but now I might know why

Post # 15
Member
1944 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

Unwanted babies do not just end up in the foster system. We will most likely adopt from FC but the likelyhood of us getting a child under 18 mths is very slim, but we are ok with that. Private adoptions, attorney assisted adoptions and agency adoptions is where many turn to. 5 agencies I researched in my area start at $18,000 for private birth mom adoptions and you may not even be chosen. It’s a competive field. Now biracial and AA adoptions are always in need and there will be babies just waiting to be adopted but no one wants them and that’s tragic to me.

Post # 16
Member
1944 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

@MrsSl82be:  I agree but there is a major tax credit that is available for adoptive parents as well as many employer assistance. It’s a start I guess!

The topic ‘Adoption and the Foster System’ is closed to new replies.

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