(Closed) Advantages of purchasing a dog from a breeder over adoption?

posted 6 years ago in Pets
  • poll: My pet was:
    adopted from a shelter : (176 votes)
    62 %
    selected from a breeder : (106 votes)
    38 %
  • Post # 17
    Member
    159 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: November 2013

    We went with a breeder because we were looking for a specific breed, wanted a puppy, & westies can be known to be a little curmudgeon-y so we wanted to make sure we got babies we knew were bred for their temperament. No regrets here.

     

     

     

    Post # 18
    Member
    7524 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2013

    @mrswestcoast:  I don’t know how rare they actually are but we’ve been looking for a Samoyed for over six months. We haven’t found any young adults at any local shelters or through any of the pet finding websites. 

    I find it strange that someone called our reason of not being able to find our breed “a load of crap.” I spend time each weekend calling shelters in our area and using online resources to try and locate what we are looking for. Perhaps I’m missing a resource or not checking in enough with shelters?

    Post # 19
    Member
    722 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: January 2014

    My Fiance and I are looking to buy a dog for about 6 months.  We live in Mexico so things are a little different here.  We did look at the shelters.  But, many of the shelter dogs have been street dogs and therefore are not people friendly at all.  Most mexicans have a don’t touch policy for street dogs so they literally have had no human contact.  Other dogs at the shelters were non responsive to an extreme due to the high heat index.  We took it a step further and tried to find a puppy at any of the shelters in our area.  But, had no luck.

    Finally my Fiance said lets just go with a breeder and get a puppy so we know what we’re getting.  Thats my little story.  I don’t want to be called scum of the earth.  This is simply what works for us.

    Post # 20
    Member
    62 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: June 2014

     

    Mine are from breeders.  we have also gotten dogs from shelters but we wanted a puppy boxer from a Reputable breeder, which griffey is.  He comes with a 5 year health guarantee and a lifetime temperament guarantee.  Our breeder is very reputable and only breeds once every 3-5 years and breeds to better the boxer breed.  Griffeys line hasn’t had any issue with cancer in a few lines now (I know that doesn’t mean he can’t get cancer) but it’s nice knowing that a breed that commonly gets cancer hasn’t had those issues because of good breeding.

    also like I said we have no issues adopting if we found what we like but I don’t like not knowing the history of a shelter dog… I have some significant scars on my arm from a shelter dog we adopted that had a fear we didn’t know about and he latched onto my arm.  My friends baby was also attacked (he’s ok) by the fog they adopted from the shelter… obviously there are similar stories from purbred breeder dogs too but I at least feel I have a little more control over it.

    this is griffey as a puppy

    Post # 21
    Member
    766 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    @mrswestcoast:  So the dog I had growing up was from a breeder. It was really important to my parents that if we were getting a dog, we had to know exactly what breed it was because my brother, dad, and I have allergies (mom does not). He was a wonderful dog. Had a great temperament, but was plagued with health issues throughout his life. I doubt this is the case with all breeders, especially ones who were very careful. Our little guy required daily medication and prescription dog food for almost 12 years. We had to put him down last year because he began to deteriorate very rapidly and his quality of life was not good anymore. 

    The dog I have now is a 7 year old chihuahua/maltese mix. I adopted him from a woman whose abusive husband was being released from jail. She was worried about the safety of her dogs so she decided to rehome them. While he wasn’t seriously neglected, my dog had fleas and needed quite a few teeth removed because they were all so badly infected when I got him. Since then, he’s been very healthy. He’s a sweetheart of a dog and aside from my Fiance, one of the bright spots in my life. We also have a rescued greyhound who is probably the healthiest dog that I have ever encountered. 

    I think you take a risk of health problems/temperment problems either way you go. I don’t believe that I will get a puppy again because it’s my preference to take in older dogs that may not have otherwise gotten a chance at life. But I certainly don’t judge people who choose to go to breeders because there are a lot of perfectly valid reasons for doing that, such as wanting to know the exact breed, wanting to know the dog’s whole history, wanting to shape the temperament (especially if you have children). 

    Post # 22
    Member
    766 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    @Soccergk1987:  He is so cute he doesn’t even look real! 

    Post # 23
    Member
    3075 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: April 2013 - A court...

    one of my dogs is an eskie, I looked on petfinder for one but all the ones they had had health problems (we could afford another dig just not one with expensive health issues) or were dogs that didn’t get along with kids/ other dogs which I needed. 

    My other dog we got before my eskie, & we got her from cl for 1/3 of the price of adopting. Supposedly the owners were going to take her to the shelter though maybe they lied.  When we picked her up she was very dirty which made us sad since they sent us a pic when she was a puppy & it seemed like they cared for more then :/.  She is the most loyal dog ever, & I can trust her without a leash though of course I don’t let her off for safety reasons. 

    dh & I want to either adopt or foster when we get a home but that us years away. 

    Post # 24
    Member
    384 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2014

    @mrswestcoast:  Our fur-baby is a black lab, who I purchased from “a breeder” when she was 8 weeks old. I use “breeder” loosely because they were a family who chose to have their lab bred so that they could raise the puppies with their children. Aside from the one litter, their dog was never bred again. 

    Our pup came with AKC paperwork, but we never had any intent to breed or show her. For me, it was about getting a dog that was predictable- mostly because she would be around our nieces and nephew. We liked seeing her as a puppy, and meeting her parents (furry parents and human parents). 

    I so much admire those who choose to rescue, and I hope we are able to someday, but I wouldn’t have done this any other way. Our dog is so, so wonderful! 

    Post # 25
    Member
    3075 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: April 2013 - A court...

    Post # 26
    Member
    628 posts
    Busy bee

    @allyfally:  +1. It’s really hard to find puppies in the shelters where I live (trust me, I’ve looked). I really wanted to “raise” a dog from puppyhood to avoid potential behavioural issues. 

    @Soccergk1987:  Your dog is freaking adorable!

    Post # 27
    Member
    984 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    @Soccergk1987:  So what happens if his health or temperament fails before five years is up? Do you return him for a refund?

    My dogs and cats have all been rescues. It breaks my heart that I can’t bring them all home with me from the shelter. I believe the dog show/breeding industries contribute to the overpopulation and suffering of many animals, including those fancy purebreds with genetic and behavioral disorders. And puppy mills? Ugh, don’t get me started.

    Post # 28
    Member
    3669 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

    @mrswestcoast:  

    Here is my little girl:

    Inbox me if you have any specific questions 🙂 

    I will answer your questions in a PM 

    Post # 29
    Member
    1299 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: August 2015

    I feel that I can speak fairly about this from both sides.

    For years my parents showed and bred standard poodles as a hobby. They would only have one litter every few years and their puppies were highly sought after for several reasons:

    – People knew the puppies would not be predisposed to any health issues because of careful planning with the genetics of the dogs that were bred

    – The puppies received the best care, socialization, training, etc.

    – If for any reason the family could no longer keep their dog, they could bring it back to my parents no matter what (this only happened once; turned out the husband was abusive and when the wife left him she couldn’t take the dog with her)

    – Their dogs had a reputation for being highly intelligent, kind, and well-mannered

    – Standard poodles are hypoallergenic, so they’re one of few options for many people

     

    I guess it all comes down to the fact that when you know a breeder is good, you know with 99% certainty what you’re getting when you get a puppy.  My parents had a huge waiting list.  When they had puppies available, they would go down the list and have the families come to our house for an interview and to see how they interacted with the dogs.  Everyone who the dog would be living with was required to be there.  If they felt the people were the type of people who should have a puppy, they would then ask them which puppy they were interested in, and if my parents thought it was a good match they would let them buy.  If they didn’t think it was a good match, they would suggest the puppy they thought was best.  Like I said, in all their years of breeding, only one dog came back to live with us, so it worked really well.

    That said, I would personally never buy a dog.  There are just too many great dogs out there who need loving homes.  When Fiance and I get a dog, we will absolutely adopt.  We might adopt of a breed-specific rescue organization, but we will definitely adopt.  Because of my parents, I completely understand why certain people want to go with a breeder, but I wouldn’t feel right.  Also, there are VERY FEW breeders out there like my parents.  A lot of them are jerks just trying to make money and treating their dogs terribly.  My parents reported people all the time who they knew weren’t taking proper care of their dogs.

    Post # 30
    Member
    1456 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: January 2015

    So, I will admit, I used to be 100% pro-shelter, anti-breeder. Then we started looking for our own dog. Right off the bat, we were disqualified from most private rescues because we’re masters students, live in an apartment, and are young. Fiance wanted a pug, so we went for breed specific rescues. Being our first dog, we didn’t want one that was either extremely elderly, or had significant behavioral or health problems. We applied, waited for MONTHS, and after calling and emailing trying to move forward in the adoption process, we were told we were disqualified for the same reasons as the previous shelters gave us.

    So we were about to look into breeders, when I turned to the least acceptable form of pet searching: craigslist. We found a woman an hour away who had a healthy, 2 year old pug that she wanted to give up. We paid $400 for him, which was high, but I knew she genuinely cared about her dog, she just couldn’t give him the attention he needed. She basically grilled us too! but then decided we were good people. He’s in his forever home now 🙂 I like to think that we just skipped the middle man (the shelter) and got a perfect dog!

    We did make a pretty nice donation in his name to the pug rescue, even though they denied us, because we really do believe in their cause. Maybe another day it will work out for us! But now I am not so completely anti-breeder. Sometimes going down to the pound and getting the first cute little dog isn’t the best answer for everyone.

    Post # 31
    Member
    62 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: June 2014

    @Fluffmallow:  I totally agree with you about puppy mills… I don’t put that in the class of breeders… And health issues usually start showing up around 2 years of age.. Especially stuff like hip displasia… And temperment is LIFETIME… And Griffey actually has a fear anxiety and the breeder tracked the issue back to his grandfather so we chose to keep him and the breeder has promised us another puppy IF we want it which we don’t know if we will as she isn’t gonna breed for a few years still cuz a lot of genetic testing an research goes into her breedings

    puppy mills is what cause overpopulation and people not fixing their animals… That’s another thing that was mandatory for getting our dog… He had to be fixed within 8 months or they would take him back.

    The topic ‘Advantages of purchasing a dog from a breeder over adoption?’ is closed to new replies.

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