(Closed) Advice for dog's nails?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
619 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

My mum’s dog is a rescue, and is very anxious when it comes to being bathed or having his nails clipped. Usually, we hand him over and then wait outside out of eyeshot. He seems to calm down if he can’t see us… Maybe you could try that? Mum’s dog still gets very antsy, last time it actually took two people to hold him and cut his nails… two people fighting to cut a chihuahua’s nails, sight I thought I’d never see 🙁
They told us after the first time to always touch and play with his feet to get him used to the idea of being touched. It’s helped a little.

If that doesn’t work, then maybe you should have a talk to a vet and see what your options are.

Also, any chance of you being able to take him for walks on paths etc? Concrete can help wear his nails down, then he might not need to have it done so often?

Post # 4
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2004

i totally understand this!! we have a chihuahua cross silky, and he has the longest hardest nails ever.. he is sooo hard to get cut, that DH and i have to go in to the groomer and DH has to hold him down while i talk to him to stop him crying and squirming, (he starts crying before the groomer has even started cutting) and we get it done sooooo quick that he doesnt have time to fuss. The groomer knows we are coming so its literally in and out and over in no time. Also i run my dog every day on the concrete and asphelt, and it doesnt make a difference to his nails, they just dont wear down. Hope this helps!! and good luck!

ETA, and i dont mean hold him own, the groomer showed us how to hold him, you hold the dog to your chest and slip your thumb under the collar and hold his head in sort of a lock. it sounds worse than it is, but his nails get so long, and we cannot cut them by ourselves.

Post # 5
Member
11327 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

Vets offices will usually cut them for a price. Mine costs $12 I think. And they definitely won’t turn you away!

 

Post # 6
Member
750 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I just recently spoke with a dog trainer about this… he suggested not to clip them at all, but rather take the dog to a place like a tennis court and just run around and play with him – the ground will naturally file the nile down.

Post # 7
Member
2494 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

My ex used to run on asphalt with our dog and we never cut her nails….. As a last resort 🙂

Post # 8
Member
1021 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

They should be able to do it at your vet’s office without needing to sedate him. They have better skills and probably more manpower when it comes to nervous, flailing dogs. My dog is big, strong and very skittish and our vet has always been able to cut her nails with the help of a vet tech or two.

 

Post # 9
Member
808 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Take your dog to the vet, they can sedate your dog for the first time. If they are really long and they get cut short it will hurt the dog (and probably make your dog even more anxious)…once you get the “main cut done” all you have to do is play with your dogs toes everyday…lots of rewards and praise. Then when you get the dogs nails cut again your dog wont freak out about people getting near the toes.

Post # 10
Member
808 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

can you put a photo of what you consider long???

Post # 11
Member
998 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Our vet prescribed an anti-anxiety medication or our dog. She takes it during storms and when she is on her meds we clip her toe nails. Do not continue to take your dog o different groomers hoping to get a better outcome. It won’t happen. Your dog needs something to help ease the anxiety they are feeling. 

Post # 12
Member
2609 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

@russian_doll:  this is exactly what I was going to suggest.  Have the vet do it under sedation this time, so she doesnt have any further negative associations with it,  then start with positive training! I started by just placing my palm under my dogs foot while it was against the ground, and feeding her peanut butter, and worked up to holding her paw up and clipping one nail at a time for… I guess 10 days? lol… is that how many toes? Then 2at a time, and so on, until I  could do both feet at one time without her freaking out.  Anyway, she still doesnt love to have it doneNow I just place a smear of peanut butter on the side of the tub, and she licks it off while I trim them.  She barely notices what I’m doing.

Post # 13
Member
808 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@MissNoodles:  My dog loves peanut butter in his “kong toy” and I just play with his feet while he chews on it 🙂

Post # 15
Member
3683 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

Don’t feel too bad about those.  I work in a vet’s office–and I’ve seen worse!  Get the people at your vet’s office to cut his nails.  They’re used to uncooperative dogs.

Post # 16
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2004

honestly some dogs nails just dont wear down from running on any suface. We have had so many dogs and only our little dog has had to get his nails cut, and they are long. It doesnt matter what type of surface we run him on and honestly we have tried so many to get them to wear down, so dont think your not doing enough. but i hope it works out for you. 🙂

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