(Closed) Allergic to my white gold engagement ring =[

posted 8 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I would just get it plated right now, then get it replaced with platinum when you can afford it.

If you put platinum next to white gold, the difference will be noticeable, plus the hardness of the materials is different and they’ll scratch. If i were you, i’d just wear a platinum wedding band, then save save save for the engagement ring setting and get it asap. You could even get a very plain platinum band for around $800, which i know is still expensive =

Post # 4
Member
1927 posts
Buzzing bee

I have heard that a lot of people have had success with the clear nail polish trick.  My only concern is damaging the ring if you are looking to use it as credit towards a new ring in the future.  I would go ahead and get your wedding band in platinum.. that way, when your engagement ring is really bothering you, you can just wear your wedding band alone and not have an issue.  I wouldn’t worry about the two metals being together.  My engagement ring is platinum and after an extensive search for a wedding band the only one I found that I liked didn’t come in platinum so I got white gold.  You can’t tell a difference (although I will say very little metal shows because the three stones in my engagement ring span the whole width of my finger and my wedding band is an eternity band).

Post # 5
Member
555 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I’ve got the allergy.  Here’s how I sometimes beat it. First I’ve worn rings and have actually pushed through it and had my skin get used to it, granted I tend to wear my rings a bit looser so it helps. I find that the allergy is worse if my skin can’t breathe or if I sweat. If the ring is thicker then it doesn’t work because there’s not enough breathing room. I’ve tried the clear nail polish and it does nothing at all. I have heard that jewelers can put a clear coat of some kind of special coating for this exact purpose so check with your jeweler but also others regarding that coating. I’ve also heard that 18k is the best to get because of the allergy and that’s the least amount of nickel in it. If it were me I’d make sure you weren’t allergic to the platinum before you get that as well because I’ve had things that were platinum plated and had a reaction to it as well so be careful. Then again I’ve had allergic reactions to the Rhodium too so it all depends.

Post # 6
Member
1426 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

I do the nail polish trick on necklaces all the time (I’m also allergic) but I’ve never tried it on a ring, or on anything more expensive than costume jewelry.  It does work when I have tried it though.  Would you ever consider yellow gold? As far as I know, they don’t cut that with nickel, but it would probably be about the same price as the white gold.  Or, you could always look into a different white metal like silver- I don’t know why no one ever uses this for wedding sets.  It’s a perfectly nice metal, and the meaning of the set is way more important than what people say the metal is worth anyway.

Post # 7
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

Rhodium is super toxic- I wouldn’t recommend that route.  I am sorry your jeweler didn’t use higher quality white gold- it can be made with palladium, as you mentioned (what I mean is- palladium mixed with white gold instead of nickel, or just a pure palladium ring.  Maybe see if the jeweler can remake one with palladium white gold instead of nickel white gold.  I am really sorry!  I am allergic too.  See if you can try out a palladium band to know if you would develop a reaction, but as far as I know, palladium is a wonderful metal.   

Post # 8
Member
45 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I, too, have the allergy and was super concerned about this while we were picking out rings!  Luckily our jeweler was a family friend and warned us against palladium.  He said its super finicky and there have been times he is polishing it and the metal just goes dull, like fogs over and loses its shine.  He said the best things to do were to go up to 18k (which you obviously already did), do the clear nail polish trick, or move to platinum. 

Although its more than you plan to spend right now, if you can budget the platinum, I would go for it.  My friend was dropping $100 every 2 years to get her rhodium replaced and just a few years of that would make up the difference of just getting the platinum!

Good luck!

Post # 9
Member
555 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Just did some web research and just to reiterate what I mentioned about checking for a platinum allergy . . . I’ve read several websites that said out of the people with an allergy to nickel 35-65% of those people are also allergic to platinum. Most sites also recommend a “long lasting plastic coating” from the jewelers OR to go the Palladium route.

Also can someone explain why Rhodium is super toxic? And give some more info on the finicky properties of Palladium, thanks!

Post # 10
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

All rhodium compounds should be regarded as highly toxic and as carcinogenic.  I worked for a jeweler that did things old school (I went to school for jewelry, and we had a new facility and did not use any rhodium, but I undertstand it is a jewelry standard in the industry.)  When I said something about safety the jeweler’s wife went, “we can’t even use the ‘good stuff’ anymore- since 9/11.”  Yikes!

You can look up the chemical properties.  I personally don’t mind my white gold ring having a tinge of yellow, gold IS yellow afterall. 

Post # 11
Member
2186 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

ive got a nickel allergy too – but i knew ahead of time, and know that most golds have nickel in them.

there is an alternative. there is gold that has very little nickle in them, however usually its too “soft” to use to set stones with. Maybe discuss with your jeweler about what karat your gold is? (i learned earlier on that the higher the karat the less nickle is in it, so i could only wear 24kt gold or higher, or sterling silver. also platinum and titanium are ok for me.)

Post # 12
Member
2186 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

oh and be careful with palladium – it has nickel in it too!!

Post # 13
Member
2186 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

do NOT put nail polish on your ring. seriously – its not costume jewelry! they do make solutions for sealing the inside of the ring, but since sweat makes the nickel leech, its still possible for it to cause a reaction for you.

Post # 14
Member
45 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2010

@Cricket1524 ….Im not totally sure of why palladium greys, but I found this after some searching…

Back when I used to do jewelry repair work and ring sizing, we’d often get an older version palladium ring to work on.  When you heat up palladium it turns dull grey.  When platinum is heated, it returns to an unchanged, polsihed state.  Palladium, though a noble metal, does get surface oxidation or fire scar on it where platinum heated to the same temperature doesn’t.
It must be the small amount of alloy or just the nature of palladium

The fact that palladium does grey out when heated also probably is the same reason I feel it greys out under normal temperature over time more so than platinum.  It is in the nature of the metal, I suppose.

David S. Atlas

GG(GIA), ASG, Sr. Mbr. NAJA

http://www.datlas.com
http://www.datlasestates.com
http://www.dglaservices.com

Post # 15
Member
67 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I have a palladium ering, and like it quite a lot.

You can get white gold made with palladium instead of nickel.  It’s actually quite common in Europe to make white gold with palladium.  Shop around until you find a jewler that will do white gold with palladium.

eta: You might also think about putting your ering aside after the wedding and only wearing a band until you can change the setting.

Post # 16
Member
113 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

This happened to my sister! She got the e-ring and the matching band (it was a set) coated and then wore it for the wedding day. Afterwards, she put it on a silver chain and wore it around her neck until they had the money to buy a platinum ring. In the meantime she wore a different ring that didn’t make her react so badly.

She was afraid the coating would come off and cause the allergy again. She wore her original ring for a day and her entire finger was swollen and rashed. She had to go get steroid cream from the doctor and didn’t want to go through that again.

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