(Closed) Another great 'Unplugged' Article

posted 5 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
135 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I can’t understand the people who do that and KNOW they are being an obstacle. I heard a guy at a wedding once say he was going to give the photograoher ” a run for their money”. You mean the couples money you jerk. 

Post # 4
Member
6339 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

@PizzutiStudios:  Oh god, that article has properly freaked me out!

Photography is SO important to us, and we’ve splurged and spent a lot: $3750, which is top-whack in the UK. The thought of having a guest ruin a photo makes me feel sick and panicky. I also hate the idea of me just seeing a see of phones/cameras, not faces, when I walk down the aisle, urgh.

We will DEFINITELY be doing an ‘unplugged’ ceremony, and I’m going to politely suggest that people refrain from taking photos in other parts of the day, too, until the photographer has finished and left. I’ll also be asking that people don’t post photos on social media until we give the go-ahead; I want people to see the professional shots, not crappy cell-phone snaps, and I don’t care if that makes me sound like a bridezilla lol

Post # 5
Member
2375 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

From my sweet fiance: Honey, if any idiot tries to take pictures during the ceremony, I’ll pause what we’re doing, take the phone and throw it out the window.  The idiot might go out the window too…you know, like in Indiana Jones.  The no ticket scene. 

This is why we’re doing unplugged. 

Post # 6
Member
6355 posts
Bee Keeper

I’ve noticed that a good photographer can handle the competition/challenge of auntie Joan and her camera. Few people go to an event with a camera constantly glued to their face, and pro photography is all about catching fleeting especially-beautiful moments.

…imagine the bride in the case of that article only had photos like in those examples… “coryann photography”‘s extremely washed-out, terribly-chosen shots! I don’t mean to pick on that photographer (I have no idea who she is) and maybe she just put up a selection of her worst shots, but maybe not.. and even my auntie can do better than those. Thank goodness her family and friends will have better photos. Yay for redundancy.

Post # 7
Member
424 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I’ve never really understood the whole unplugged thing, and honestly cherish the pictures I have from guests.  But that article puts everything in an entirely different perspective!  I would be PISSED if any of my images had been ruined like that!  I wonder if there’s a way to ask guests to be cognizant of their photo-taking without completely asking them to turn everything off.

Post # 8
Member
4770 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

That Heinz Chapel is something else.  this has nothing to do with an unplugged wedding.  What kind of place allowes guests to stand in the aile but dosn’t allow the photog to even enter??  If that’s the venue the clients want that’s what they get and the photog should not feel bad.  I don’t get why they can’t be seated with the guests…

I do love the idea of unplugged, but I also have the experience of having a deadbeat photog, so if I didn’t have guest’s photos I’d have been devastated, so I’m really torn on this.

Post # 9
Member
5001 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

Wow!! I was thinking about doing an unplugged ceremony and now I definitely will!! Ours is outdoors, so we don’t need to worry about the flash, but I don’t want people standing up and ruining the pictures. Plus, I feel like you can’t really enjoy and remember things as well when you’re taking pictures. I will have my officiant say something like in this article, thanks!!

Post # 10
Member
1669 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

I’m going to sort of politely spread the word that we’d love this throughout the wedding, though at the ceremony it won’t be a problem – our church does not allow the use of cameras or cell phones of any kind during the ceremony except the photographer (who is limited where they can be) – the church wedding director will enforce this, not me.

It isn’t so much the ruined pictures, for me it’s just… I hate people being so disconnected all the time. It makes me so sad when I see couples out in a restauraunt each on their phone. Of course, if somebody wants to spend my entire reception on their phone, there’s nothing really to be done about it. Their loss. Eh.

Post # 11
Member
3774 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@joya_aspera:  I may have read the article wrong, but I think she purposely put up the washed out shots to show how the flashes of the guests cameras ruined her professional shots.

Post # 13
Member
6339 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

@joya_aspera:  A photographer can only do so much. If guests keep jumping in the way to take photos, there’s not a lot they can realistically do about that, and the shot will already be ruined anyway. Similarly, camera flash can easily ruin a shot, and again, can’t easily be rectified.

Then there’s the shots you get of the bride walking down the aisle and every other guest’s face is obscured by a camera/phone; it looks awful. I want to see my guests faces in my photos, not their phone!

That. and I’m paying a lot of money for a professional photographer. I’ve seen entire weddings he’s shot, with 1500 awesome photos; I am confident he will capture everything, and well. I don’t need crappy cell-phone photos, and would prefer it if guests refrained.

I also don’t think you can poperly enjoy the day if you’re snapping away constantly. I used to be really into taking photos; now, not so much. Why? Because I realised that my obsession to capture everything on film meant that yeah, I had great photos to look back on, but my memories were of me stuck behind a camera all night.

Post # 14
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@joya_aspera:  “I’ve noticed that a good photographer can handle the competition/challenge of auntie Joan and her camera. Few people go to an event with a camera constantly glued to their face, and pro photography is all about catching fleeting especially-beautiful moments.”

The topic is unplugged ceremonies – so how exactly do you suggest we handle peopl sticking their arms in the aisle to capture their smartphone or tablet images?  How do you suggest we deal with someone during a ceremony who decides that right as the bride walks down the aisle to jump into the aisle to get a better vantage?  I’m just curious as to what your suggestion is.  

And I’m also not sure how many weddings you go to… I average about 30 a year and I can honestly tell you that there are lots of people who are glued to their devices.  Maybe not cameras to faces anymore, but most certainly smartphones and now sadly – tablets.  As a professional I’m not looking at them as competition, I’m not at all worried they are going to capture something better than I can.  I consider them interference in doing a job I’m paid a lot of money to do and saboteurs of moments.  It’s a sad state of affairs when for one special day no one can put their devices down.

Post # 15
Member
6355 posts
Bee Keeper

@s2bmrscook:

@barbie86:  

@continuumphotography:  

I get that she was complaining about other peoples’ flashes washing her subjects out. But my immediate thought was then “And if it was the sun? Would that be your excuse for bad photos then? What if the indoor lighting wasn’t ideal for photos…as it pretty much NEVER is? Then what?”

…because tricky lighting is always going to be a factor…  a factor, but not an excuse. There will always be challenges that a pro photographer is going to have to deal with. (Or, in this case, whine about rather than deal with). 

Another thing that photog can’t blame the guests on is the awkwardness of the photos in general. Odd moments and placements,  and yeah, looks like the wrong settings for the lighting, a lot if the time, as well. Photography is an art form, but not everyone’s an artist and not every artist is on their game all the time… the short of it: these aren’t frameable, IMO, and it’s not just because of guest cameras.

That’s why I say my auntie can do better, and if I were that bride, I’d be glad auntie got in her shots, too. I could see why the pro would feel threatened by that, though.

My suggestion for avoiding shots like these is probably obvious to any photographer: Don’t take them. Any pro or even amateur knows that photography isn’t just showing up with expensive equipment and shooting willy-nilly. Zoom in and/or change your angle and/or wait, to cut out an unattractive feature of an image, whether it’s someone with their camera, or an extension cord, or a fire extinguisher, or someone with a bum itch. The guests are just such incredibly insufferable paparazzi that they are mobbing the bride with cameras? Take pictures in such a way that a little photoshopping can do the trick.

You’d think from the article’s description every wedding was more chaotic than a sighting of a celebrity…something I’ve not noticed in real life… and I’ll point out that even if it was, photogs are often able to get great pics of those celebs as if there are no other photographers there, even though they’re actually part of a giant mob of flashbulbs surrounding the poor celeb. Not magic, just talent. Maybe not the best use of talent, but still.

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