(Closed) Another “invite wording” help post…

posted 6 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 3
Member
2125 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I had to double check mine…but they did not include “their daughter” in the verbiage and it looks just fine. 

 

Mine simply read mr. and mrs so and so request the honor of your presence at the nupital mass of

Sarah Smith

&

Richard Grant

 

and yes, I had my mother and stepfather listed above our names. but also incuded my single father and my FI’s single mother…I think I have a pic of my invites posted in a thread I started if you wanna see how it turned out.

Post # 4
Member
2125 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@fresitachulita:  obviouisly you woulnd’t want to put nupital mass unless you are having one…there are varios ways to subsitute using simplat “at the marriage of” or “to whitness the exchange of marriage vows” etc. etc.

Post # 5
Member
1917 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

It’s not correct to use the titles like that.  I would either list it as Mr. and Mrs. Bob Smith or Barbara and Bob Smith if you want her name to be listed on the invite.

Post # 6
Member
3175 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I would probably put “Mr. & Mrs. Bob (Robert?) Smith” or “Bob Smith & Barbara Smith request the pleasure of your company at the marriage of Your Name & FH’s Name”

ETA: Edited because I was typing and not thinking & said the wrong thing Tongue Out

Post # 7
Member
2125 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

yeah, I actually think it’s appriate to spell out both parents names, no mr/mrs is needed, especialy if they have different last names and as I understand the wife’s name is always listed first. I had a stationer help me along the way with what was proper.

Post # 8
Member
989 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

If you want to keep the “daughter” language, I would write “Bob and Barbara Smith request the pleasure of your company at the marriage of her daughter.”

I’m in a very similar situation to you and we went with

“Together with their parents

Fred and Wilma Flintstone

and

Barney and Betty Rubble

Sportsgal31

and

Sportsguy27

request the pleasure of your company…”

Post # 9
Member
1917 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

Yes, the woman’s name is always listed first, because you don’t separate a man’s name from his last name.  The only exception to this is when you’re saying Mr. and Mrs. Barney Rubble.

Post # 11
Member
1699 posts
Bumble bee

@spm:  There is a traditional correct wording for this situation. Even before divorce was ubiquitous, it happened, and widowed mothers remarried, and they still gave receptions in celebration of their daughters’ weddings. The traditional wording would be:

 

Mr and Mrs Robert Smith
request the honour of the presence of
<write in guests’ names>
at the wedding of her daughter
Susan Patricia Milne
to
Mr Guy
Handsomon
et cetera

“her daughter” is used instead of “their daughter”, by reason of simple accuracy. No honourific is used for the bride because she is intimately connected to the hosts; but the bride’s surname, usually omitted because it is the same as her mother’s surname, is included because the mother has changed her name. Ladies nowadays often prefer to use their given name with their husband’s surname, rather than taking both names, so an equally proper first line would be “Mr Robert Smith and Ms Barbara Smith”, or despite some etiquette writers’ attempts to codify titles more rigidly  “Mr Robert Smith and Mrs Barbara Smith” if that is the title the lady prefers, or even  “Mrs Barbara Smith and Mr Robert Smith” if for some reason she insists on shrugging off her husband’s traditional protective precedence.   

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