(Closed) Antique Ring Question

posted 7 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
656 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

My fiance used a stone from one of his grandma’s rings, and had it taken out of its original setting. His mom was sweet enough to offer him his great-grandma’s ring for the wedding band, and he had the engagement ring (loose) stone put into a  new setting designed to match the wedding band. I LOVE the idea of antique rings now that I have them, they each have a story, even the loose diamond that was re-set into my e-ring.

From what I understand about that process from talking to the jeweler when I got the rings resized, it’s not necessarily the design that’s costly, it’s the materials. Gold is really expensive right now, but since you have the metal already, you should go see a reputable jeweler (one with a jeweler in-house, that’s what my Fiance used) and perhaps describe the ring and ask what they could do. I think it’s not as bad/expensive as starting from scratch, especially if you already have the materials! That said, I couldn’t give you a ballpark figure or anything, but definitely go ask.

Post # 4
Member
3968 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

I am currently searching for my own antique ring! While I am hoping to find the “complete package” together, I do think it’s possible to do that, but it might be more expensive. I haven’t bought anything from them, but I know there’s a website called Old World Diamonds or something similar… you might be able to find a stone you love WITHOUT a setting. Despite being antiques, I don’t think they are necessarily markedup, but doing some research would be good!

 

Now I want to look and see if I can find this diamond you like. If it’s an ideal cut, I don’t think it’s an antique stone (usually they’re called old european, old mine, or transitional, so I would double check that if you want to make sure you have an antique stone). For an old european cut from that website, I found one that’s somewhat similar for 4400- http://www.oldworlddiamonds.com/detail.php?ID=20&SHAPE=EU. Good luck!

Post # 5
Member
3968 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

I just realized it’s a three stone ring…and that was just the center stone! That is definitely a great deal to me. Rhodium plating isn’t very expensive, but you do have to re plate every so often.

Post # 6
Member
1052 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

It’s normal for white gold to have a yellowish tinge, since gold is yellow and it’s the alloys they add to it that make it white. Since it’s 18k gold, it has a higher percentage of gold and thus is more yellowish. The rhodium plating makes it looks really silver and shiny and since this is an antique it’s normal for that to have rubbed off. A fresh coating is inexpensive and would make it look bright silvery again 🙂

Post # 7
Member
927 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

@saraja87:  i agree a rhodium plating with give it that white gold luster you are used to seeing in jewlery stores.

Post # 8
Member
1458 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

You might be getting a great deal, but were the stones in the antique ring certified at all?  It’s really comparing apples and oranges if you do not know the stats of the antique ring vs. the blue nile diamond you found with stellar stats.  You never know, the antique one could be fracture filled, very poorly cut, or something else to make the price that low.  You really tend to get what you pay for with diamonds, and although there are deals out there and room for negotioation (especially in antique shops and consignment stores), I’d personally be a little suspicious of the price.

As far as melting the gold down, my experience with that is that usually jewelers will take your old gold and use the value of it toward a new ring (like cash for gold), but the gold you provide them has to be smelted, it might not be enough for your new design, etc. and so it might not be the same exact gold.

Post # 9
Member
5011 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2012

@GoldfishPie: I thought fracture filling was a relatively new practice, so wouldn’t have been done to an antique diamond in its original state. Could someone send a ring off to be fracture filled? I know in the UK that antique/second hand jewellery is exempt from VAT, so is automatically just under 20% cheaper than new rings of exactly the same quality.

Antique cuts are also sometimes cheaper because they’re not as “desirable” even if they have a unique look. A lot of antique stones were hand-cut with some assymmetry and smaller tables so look totally different from modern diamonds (to the point that some less educated jewellers haven’t believed my ring was a real diamond).

@SapphireRose: Do you know approximately how old the ring is? 

Post # 11
Member
289 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

The very first antique ring I fell in love with my mom checked out (jeweller) and it had big cracks in the diamonds that I had missed….definitely check it out a lot first.

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