(Closed) Any bees that are runners?

posted 6 years ago in Fitness
Post # 3
Member
320 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I started about six weeks ago..

 

I felt the exact same way you did..and I still struggle with breathing, but I have learned that it just comes with the territory.

 

I use the app from couch to 5k on my phone. It is extremely helpful for someone who is not a runner. The app talks to you and tells you when to run and when to walk. I am almost done with the program, and I am running farther and faster than I ever thought possible.

Post # 4
Member
907 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

It takes while to learn the your breathing pattern that works for you.  You just have to build your endurance and push past that point were you feel out of breath.  Try to not breath through your mouth too much bc its makes you breath too quickly. Or slow down when you feel you need to catch you breathe instead of stopping.

Post # 5
Member
368 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

One of my favorite quotes:

“If you run, you are a runner. It doesn’t matter how fast or how far. It doesn’t matter if today is your first day or if you’ve been running for twenty years. There is no test to pass, no license to earn, no membership card to get. You just run.”
-John Bingham

Post # 6
Hostess
18643 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Have you been to a store to get fitted for proper shoes?  There are so many different options in shoes and you need to find out if you overpronate or not.

I agree with the previous posters that you should do intervals or running or jogging and walking and build up to more run time.

Post # 8
Member
7904 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

I’d get professionally fitted for shoes and then I’d slow down. Most novice runners run much faster than they should be. If you slow down (maybe to 5.2-5.5 mph) and then alternate running with walking, slowly increasing the time you are running by 10% a week, you will be able to run further. After than, building speed is easy.

Post # 9
Member
1577 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I consider myself a runner; although currently I have been doing more gym cardio and HIIT. I’ve run 10K’s on roads and sand, and at one point I was running 10k daily with a coworker training for a marathon.

One of my best breathing tips I picked up in cross-country tryouts in high school: when you’re getting going, concentrate on getting your breathing rhythmic. Inhale through your nose or slightly pursed lips for two steps, then exhale through pursed lips for two steps. As you get going, you’ll stop thinking about breathing; but this will get enough oxygen to your working muscles in the beginning to keep you going.

Post # 10
Member
807 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@Tmpalm:  This is one of my favorite quotes too 🙂

Alternate walking and running to start out (Couch to 5k does this). You can gradually build your endurance without getting exhausted and frustrated. Be patient–your body needs time to adjust, but it will happen and you will find a point where you genuinely enjoy running, and that will make it easier to keep going.

Also, find the right shoes for you. For me, that meant going with something minimal like Five Fingers, so that may be something to consider as well.

Post # 12
Member
1645 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

The right shoes are an important first step. It will keep you from getting injured and make running as comfortable as it can be. After that, I would just keep your expectations really low. I have run on an off for years, but when I started up running again after having my son, I could barely run a quarter mile without having to walk and was so out of breath. It just takes times to build up your endurance and fitness level. After a while, you’ll realize that you can run farther and faster without it feeling like you are working harder. It took months last year to get back to running a 10:30 minute mile, and this year it’s taken almost all season to get under 10:00 minute miles. (At my best, I’m around 9:20 to 9:40 pace, depending on the distance.) I think a Couch to 5k program or app is a great way to start up. Give it time though. Just remember that every step, every mile, every run is progress.

Post # 13
Member
7904 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

@roweboat:  Sometimes minimal shoes are best for people with really weird feet. Sometimes taking all that support crap out and letting your foot feel more in contact with the road lets you arch rise naturally and the muscles in your foot recover from decades of shoe support doing their work for them. You should really find a running store, have them put you on a treadmill with a video camera, and check out your running pattern. Don’t just find a pair of shoes online that correct for your issues. The store should let you run around inside in their shoes and find a pair you really like.

Post # 14
Member
954 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Overpronating isn’t why you “can’t run.”  Its hard because it is hard when you start.  Its hard when you run 30 miles a week, and its hard when you run marathons.  Running isn’t easy.  At first you’ll be out of breath, everythng will hurt and it might suck, but its worth it.  Start easy.  most beginners run way too fast.

I overpronate and wear completely neutral shoes (Wave Riders).  Go to a running store and get fitted…but know that it may take trial and error until you find what you like.

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