(Closed) Any doctors, nurses or med students? Help with abnormal ECG

posted 7 years ago in Wellness
Post # 19
Member
547 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@greenidlady:  Honestly, looking at your second 12-lead, I believe the tech doing the EKG accidentally switched the lead placement. I think it’s erroneous. I’m willing to bet if they do a repeat, it will look like your first one. 

 

Post # 21
Member
3423 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@greenidlady:  put your mind at ease and see a cardiologist. After I had my daughter 17 yrs ago I started having palpitations severely. I went to my family doctor and he referred me to a cardiologist. I wore a holter monitor which didn’t show anything.  I had an echocardiogram and they told me I had a mitral valve prolapse which is common actually. I am not on medication and work out everyday. I can tell you that once I knew I wasn’t going to drop dead every time my heart fluttered the palpitations gradually became less frequent and now I only get them the week before my period. I understand what you’re going through it feels scary. I think you should get to the doc and put your mind at ease:) Hugs to you! 

ETA limit your caffeine intake in the meantime 

Post # 23
Member
50 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

The record that you posted says “ROS” which stands for Review of Systems. It says all systems were negative, except cardiovascular system was positive for palpitations. The Review of Systems is medicalese for a somewhat standard list of questions the doctor/nurse will ask you about each system of the body. For example, for respiratory: any cough, shortness of breath, sputum production. For neurological: any numbness or weakness, or for cardiovascular: any chest pain or palpitations.

So the “positive for palpitations” you are seeing simply means that when they asked you if you have ever had palpitations, you said yes. It doesn’t reflect anything shown on your EKG or other exams – it is part of the subjective history portion of the assessment. I hope that helps a bit — it really just confirms that they heard what you said, not that they found anything wrong on your tests. You do need to see your family doc and possibly a cardiologist to put your mind at ease. Your story sounds very reassuring.

Post # 24
Member
3423 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@greenidlady:  Maybe? I quit trying to figure it out haha. I do remember them being worse in the beginning and now they aren’t as bad. Deep breathing helps during an episode. 

I hope you get some answers today at the doctors. just a thought if you are having bloodwork done they may want to check your magnesium levels. Good luck:) 

Post # 25
Member
547 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@greenidlady:  You’re right, it’s not a good error to make. It’s not necessarily common, but it’s an easy mistake to make. You know how when you look at someone your right is their left? That’s usually how it happens, and it can happen to anyone.

So here is why I think it’s limb lead reversal and I would def ask your doctor if he thinks that’s possible. Also, when they do a repeat, look to see if these things aren’t there anyone. So lead I has global negativity, meaning the P wave, QRS, and the T wave (all of the bumps) are all pointing down instead of up. aVR is positive, meaning all of those things are pointing up. Then lead II and lead III look to be switched and aVR and aVFLlook to be swtiched. That switching is consistent with your old EKG. Look to see if the new one they do today looks like the old one. Or at least, look at lead I and see if they’re all now facing up instead of down, and aVR is now facing down instead of up. Take a picture of the new EKG if you can, too! Just for my own curiosity =P

Good luck at your appointment! I’m sure everything will go well 🙂

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