(Closed) Any gun owners on the bee? Would like some advice

posted 5 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 3
Member
3170 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I can’t tell you what kind of gun but always keep it locked. We keep ours in locked in our night stand. Do not ever leave it somewhere your child can get it. Keep it locked wherever it is.

Post # 4
Member
9139 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

Take shooting lessons since you have no experience with a gun.  Also, buy a gun with at least two redundant safeties to decrease the chance that an accidental firing might occur.  I recommend a trigger lock; you can practice taking it off before firing if you are worried about the time it takes to remove it from the gun.  This is the best protection from your child accidentally shooting themself with it.  Teach your child that guns are dangerous and allow them to see and touch it when it’s unloaded so they aren’t curious about it when you are distracted or out of the house.  Finally, realize that no matter how safe you are with the gun, you are far more likely to injure somebody you love than actually protect yourself from a robber.

In my community a shotgun or Judge handgun is the most common for home defense because the bullets don’t fire through walls which makes you less likely to injure a family member when shooting an intruder.

Finally, always treat every gun as if it’s loaded.  There is no such thing as a safe gun, only safe gun owners.

Post # 5
Member
7311 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011 - Bed & Breakfast

We have several friends and family members who are avid enthusiasts and also have children in the home. All of them have something similar to this http://www.gunvault.com/minivault-gv1000s.html as storage for their primary home defense gun while the rest are kept in much larger safes in a secure area of the home. A small safe like this allows for convenient access while assuring proper safety. They all store their guns unloaded, but with a loaded magazine in another nearby secured spot for fast access.

 

I think I would prefer a biometric lock mechanism like this if I were to have my own handgun http://www.gunvault.com/minivault-biometric-gvb1000.html. FWIW, I prefer a Glock. They fit best in my hands. If you purchase, do NOT be one of those women who chooses based on looks. Looks don’t save your life. Functionality and ergonomics (plus frequent, high quality training and practice) do. I would own, but I do not have the time necessary to devote to constant practice for proper efficacy. I feel like it would be irresponsible for me to buy a gun for home defense without being able to devote weekly practice time to it.

 

Edit: I second the recommendation about teaching your child that guns are not toys and should never be touched without active adult supervision.

Post # 6
Member
9086 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

Definitely go take shooting lessons. Trust me, gun ranges or gun clubs would ***LOVE** to teach you. They are usually over excited to teach you the ins and outs of gun safety and shooting. I worked with them in a hunting store (I am not a hunter, I sold archery equipment) and they are some really fantastic people.

That being said, guns are very personal. My husband has (I believe) a 44 for home defense. This gun is a monster. He also has a rifle for “Fun shooting”

Keeping a gun secure is somewhat my “specialty’ because I had to sell these products when I worked at the hunting store. A gun lock is probably the easiest way to keep your gun secure. It’s basically a bicycle lock that runs *through* the gun that makes it physically impossible to load and shoot. Keeping the key close by would make it easy to undo in case of emergency. Do not keep your ammo in the same spot that you keep your gun until you’re out of that “scary age” of your children.

A gun safe is the most secure. There are a billion different gun safes on the market and you can buy rather teeny tiny ones. Most have electronic locks or fingerprint scanners, so your chldren won’t be able to just open it up on a whim.

Post # 7
Member
10366 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

To keep your gun accessible enough to use it when in immediate danger at home, IMO, leaves your little boy too vulnerable to accidentally using it on himself. You are 43 times more likely to have your gun used against you in your own home, or have a child accidentally shoot themselves, then you are to actually use it in self defense.

I think having it for protection in the woods is a great idea. But, i’d keep it in a gun safe, ALWAYS, and as far away from your child as is possible.

Post # 8
Member
13096 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@crayfish:  You can get a Biometric gun safe that only opens via your fingerprints.  That way, you can keep the safe by your bed for easy access but a child can’t get into the safe because their fingerprints won’t be programmed into it.

Post # 9
Hostess
3369 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

Another vote for shooting lessons! Besides my street bike training course at the local race track, it was one of the best choices I’d made in terms of safety courses. They absolutely love teaching people to shoot, especially the women. As far as the type of gun you should get, only you will be able to decide that. It really depends on your strength, your natural grip, hand shape, what you want the gun for, etc. 

There was a GORGEOUS gun I was looking at a few months ago at a local show and was considering for my concealed carry. Come to find that FI’s best friend actually purchased it and let me shoot it. I’m glad I didn’t buy it, because I hated it. It hurt to shoot, you had to pull the trigger back way farther than I like to have to shoot (it was actually difficult to pull, and I’m pretty strong).

Tell the guys at the gun range you’re in the market and they’ll help you find something that you really love. Good luck, and have fun! 🙂 

Post # 10
Member
3140 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

@Hyperventilate:  What exactly is the “scary” age? There are teenagers that will put their paws on guns the same way a 6 year old would.

Post # 11
Member
296 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Take hunters safety, conceal and carry classes etc to learn more about guns.  It is never to early to teach your children about gun safety especially if you are going to have them!  You can teach them how to use the BB gun or airsoft/pellet gun so they understand better as well. (That is for children you think can handle the resposibility) 

You can get get a gun safe.. I agree with a previous post about the fingerprint ones.  However you can get free gun locks at your local police department.  At least the department I worked for gave them out free. 

First and foremost, if you do not understand how to use the gun properly you are putting yourself and your family in more danger than if you didn’t have one.  What type of gun are you looking for?  Different guns are made for different situations.  I have Sig Sauer 2120, Sig Sauer Mosquito which is a .22 (pink.. my valentines present last year 🙂  a Sig Sauer 229 and a Sig Sauer 226.  They take different bullets and do different damage.  We are also looking into getting a blackhawk with a 7.5” barrel but that is more for when we are camping and have any issues with bears. 

Shooting can be very stress relieving as well  🙂 

Post # 12
Member
9086 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

@mamadingdong:  Yes, that’s exactly what I meant. When your children know better to not play with a gun. That could be well into teenagerhood.

Post # 13
Member
2376 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Lessons, lessons, lessons.  We don’t have kids, but we both refuse to keep ammo & the gun in the same place.  2 different safes, 2 different locks.  We’ve got pistols, rifles and a shotgun.  Realistically, if you’re not LEO or miliary, you’re not going to get to a gun in time and successfully shoot them if someone breaks in.  Also, there’s no gun without kick.  A .22 is pretty light, but unless you hit something vital, it’s not exactly known for it’s ability to knock someone down.  Shotgun w/bird shot’s still pretty nasty, and won’t go through walls. Some ranges will let you rent a gun, or you might ask friends who own guns to go with you to the range and see if you can test theirs out. 

Regardless of how comfortable you may feel on the range, just be aware that when adrenaline, terror for yourself and your child, and surprise all kick in at the same time, most people would be lucky to hit the broad side of a barn.  Most of my family on my Dad’s side are LEOs and former military, and no offense to anyone here, but they just crack up at the idea of an civvie actually defending their home with a gun other than to hit the intruder in the head with it. 

Post # 14
Member
7770 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

Hm.  I can’t totally relate.  I grew up with guns in the house, but they were hunting rifles and shotguns.  When I was little and we lived with my Dad I knew to NEVER touch them.  Obviously, the more responsible and even more safe approach is to have them locked in a gun cabinet, which my mum and her husband always did once my mom remarried.  Now Darling Husband and I have hunting firearms, but they are kept in storage in the basement.  I don’t think of a gun as something to use for self defense (or in other words- on a person).  I guess I live somewhere I feel safe and I also have a hunting dog. 

As far as a firearm for safety in the wild, make sure you take a hunter’s safety course (even if you never plan to hunt).  If you are thinking of having a pistol, take a safety course for that too and get certified.  I personally think everyone should do this for safety reasons to learn how to properly manage the firearm they are considering- and even if they don’t ever plan to touch a firearm, I think it is important to know how to use one should the situation ever arise where you need to- as I said- for safety reasons.

Post # 15
Member
9139 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

In all honesty, my dog is more protection to my home.  Intruders will typically skip a house if it has a dog.  He looks sweet in my pictures but he barks and growls viciously at people we don’t know.

Some interesting facts and figures about what houses are more likely to be burglarized: http://www.popcenter.org/problems/burglary_home/

Post # 16
Member
38 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Get a 22. mag pistol.

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