(Closed) Any one opted for a c section purely on preference?

posted 4 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 61
Member
9541 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

Only you can decide what’s best for you.

First, as other ladies have pointed out, see if your doc will even do a section without a medical reason. I know I recently had a patient to wanted one because she was scared of the birth and nervous about her vagina afterwards and her doc wouldn’t do the section without a medical reason. 

Second, there are horror stories and great stories for both vaginal and c-section. But the real horror stories are the rarity these days. Whatever ends up happening, you and your baby will be fine. 

Third, my best friend had a really hard vaginal delivery with induction, back labor, an epidural that wore out and her blood pressure spiked so high they had to give her another, a third degree tear and lots of stitches. For her second she had a pretty straighforward planned c-section because baby was breech. She says if she had to do it again, she’d do the vaginal. Even with a rough vaginal delivery, it was better than the section. She had an infection at the incision site that required an extra day in the hospital and had bad pain for weeks and mild pain for months. Which was aggravated whenever she tried to hold or nurse her baby. To this day, she still has a numb spot over the incision. And she said her vaginal still hurt even after the c-section! 

Personally, I had a vaginal delivery last year. 21 hours of labor, including 2 hours of pushing. I didn’t take any med and while the contractions were painful, they were manageable and once I got in the bath tub, it really wasn’t bad at all. For me, pushing was the hardest part, but you power through and then you get this lovely little baby that you can hold right away and nurse right away. I did end up needing some stitches and they were uncomfortable when sitting straigh up for, maybe a week, but never really painful. If I do it again, I’ll definintely try for a vaginal. 

Post # 62
Member
1463 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

I’ve had two vaginal births, one very medicated (epi, pitocin, antibiotics, episiotomy and ventouse delivery) and one “natural” with only gas for pain relief and I would hands down choose the less medicated route purely because it makes the first 48 hours of recovery so.much.easier.

There will always be risks associated with giving birth, whichever way you choose to go, but I personally wouldn’t choose to add another layer of risk by opting for an unnecessary surgery.

Post # 63
Member
1245 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Nope. Nope nope nope. Think about it this way: there is a reason that, as paltry and barbaric as our federal leave policies are in the United States, you are deemed fit to return to work 6 weeks after a vaginal delivery but 8 weeks after a C-section. Both of those time frames are completely laughable, but it should tell you something that even the most out-of-touch legislators in the developed world understand that a C-section requires recovery from a major abdominal surgery and requires a potentially more arduous recovery than your typical vaginal delivery. C-sections are medical marvels and it’s wonderful that we have that option, for both maternal and fetal survival, if circumstances require it. C-sections should not be a boogeyman any more than vaginal tearing should be, but they both have their implications. 

I had a small, early baby but he decided to make his entrance face up, which is a challenge for the geometry of the birth canal. As a result, I pushed for 2.5 hours and had a severe 3rd degree tear. Lots of stitching and sure, recovery is not fun. 

BUT. Please don’t let the horror stories freak you out. I get it, I really do. (I almost puked at my desk the first time I read about tearing and episiotomies on this board!) Despite a severe tear, it all goes back to normal. The appearance, the sex, the pooping, all of it. Literally, all of it. And if, for some reason, it doesn’t (although that was not my experience), there is help for that 🙂 

Post # 64
Member
441 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

I’ve not had any children (and don’t really want to) but I have a question for the mothers and/or anyone else who might know the answer to this- what about when it goes beyond the ‘normal’ fear, but when there’s a mental health issue for example?

I say this as someone who suffers from severe anxiety, and while I have enough of a ‘healthy’ fear of pregnancy to take sensible measures to avoid it without it ruling my life, I really don’t know how I would cope if I actually became pregnant and were basically told I couldn’t have a C-section because it’s my first.  Surely extreme levels of anxiety are bad for both baby and mother, and in such cases electove C-section might be the safer option?

Post # 65
Member
2880 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

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tillymac :  Where are you getting your statistics from?  Because I don’t believe any of them.

Post # 66
Member
2880 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

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sydneyfrancis88 :  From what my sister’s OB friend told me (I told her about this thread), extreme anxiety is not enough to warrant a c section.

Post # 67
Member
441 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

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sunnierdaysahead2 :  What’s the rationale for that?  Surely if you’re likely to have a panic attack or similar with the unpredictability of natural birth, it would be better things were done in a more controlled manner?

Post # 68
Member
244 posts
Helper bee

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habibtee :  The whole idea that your who-ha gets damaged from childbirth is ludicrous.  It is literally designed for that.  People should save c-sections for life threatening emergencies, not elective surgery.  If you’re that worried about being torn and stretched, ask your ob/gyn for an extra stitch, you’ll be like a virgin again.

Post # 69
Member
2942 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

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sydneyfrancis88 :  My doctor would suggest counciling for your anxiety.  I have my anxiety the other way around, where a c-section scares the shit out of me.  My phobia is not being able to move/stuck in my own body.  During a c-section, you are numbed legs down, then you have your arms strapped down incase the numbing agent goes up your spine (which is common) and after you are put in a broom closet of a room for recovery.  

I am starting counciling after my next appointment as my baby may be measuring big, and if that is the case, I will need a c-section.  

Post # 70
Member
441 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

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Misswhowedding :  Glad you’ve found some help that should work for you 🙂

Maybe it’s my veterinary background, but natural birth definitely scares me more than a C-section.  Of course there can be complications, but it’s a procedure I’m familiar with and have done on my own patients!  There are so many ‘what-if’s with natural birth that would trigger my anxiety.  

This is all moot because I don’t plan on having kids anyway, I was just curious.  Plus the fact that I was born by emergency c-section after my mum had an awful 56-hour labour and was afterwards told her bone structure meant she could not have given birth naturally…and my husband is a LOT bigger than me so let’s not try that one! yell

Post # 71
Member
2880 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

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sydneyfrancis88 :  Not according to most doctors. The female body is designed to go through labor and delivery and a c section is considered major surgery and not something to be taken lightly. In other words (in general) doctors do not consider anxiety enough justification for major surgery. There are standards of care that are followed and with any kind of major surgery there are risks and those risks trump “anxiety”.

I’m trying to find another example but this is the best I can think off the top of my head. Say you need to have your gall bladder removed. The standard of care is laparoscopic removal, a less invasive surgery than an open abdominal surgery. If you went to your surgeon and told him the idea of him pulling your gsll bladder out through a tiny incision gives you a panic attack, and you’d rather risk an open surgery and all the potential complications, he’d tell you to find another surgeon. 

Anxiety is a condition that can be controlled. There are obstetric conditions that cannot be controlled and thus justify having a c section.

Post # 72
Member
2737 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: County courthouse

I’ve had 2 csection. One emergency and one elective at almost 42wks. While my post op was a breeze, I was walking an hour after my surgery. Yes it’s painful…but really not as painful as I thought it would be. My nurses were shocked when I wanted to get up and walk almost immediately after my csection, but they encouraged it. I was never on heavy duty main meds after…just regular strength Tylenol. What hurt the most after my surgery was my first poop. My stich didn’t get infected and I recovered quickly compared to most csections, but I was really young…22 and 24. As easy as recovery was for me, I don’t recommend an elective csection. It is very scary….I had to be sedated with my first because I had a severe panic attack. Please do some research with vaginal births…natural IS always better on you and your baby.

Post # 73
Member
505 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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sexymama118 :  Please do some research with vaginal births…natural IS always better on you and your baby.

I posted something along these lines early on in this post. It surprises me how little the effect of the c-section on the baby is mentioned in this thread. There are an increasingly large number of studies on the short-term and long-term effects of babies born via c-section. (Just as there are on the risks of babies born vaginally). 

Note: I am NOT against c-sections- I am a c-section baby myself and they are a marval of modern medicine. The effects of c-sections on the baby SHOULD be one of many considerations someone makes especially when exploring an elective c-section. Ultimately the decision is between the mother and her doctor based on what is best for her and the baby taking into consideration all effects/pros/cons on the mother and chilld. 

Post # 74
Member
274 posts
Helper bee

I’ve chosen to have an elective c-section for a lot of the reasons mentioned above. Just to add some thoughts:

-I like the predictability of outcome associated with a routine c-section. I know there’s a very high chance I’ll come out with a healthy baby, and a cut in my tummy that will take a certain amount of time to heal. The unpredictability of vaginal birth scares me, as well as the potential for so many things to go wrong for me and baby – and of course, the possibility of an emergency c-section during labor anyway

-contrary to the above poster, I actually feel that c-sections are safer for the baby, and recent research does seem to be supporting this view. Although there are some benefits for babies born vaginally, there are also risks of shoulder injuries, head injuries, oxygen deprivation, and if you need to add in an intervention like forceps, this risk increases dramatically. With an elective c-section, the baby is out in a few minutes, and there’s much less risk of birth injury

-I would much prefer to have stitches in my stomach than the risk of long-term pelvic floor and bladder and bowel issues, vaginal prolapse, etc.

Ultimately it’s a personal choice, and I should add that the vaginal birth experience is really not something I feel like I need to have – if that is something you feel like you want, that’s a valid consideration. Pain also didn’t factor into my decision at all, because I would have had all the pain relief had I delivered vaginally anyway!

I will have skin-to-skin with the baby immediately after birth, and my hospital encourages you to start feeding straight away as well. I’ll have an epidural, but I’d have one if I delivered vaginally anyway. I know friends who’ve had electives have said they found bonding really easy because they were well-rested, and not exhausted from delivery.

Finally, I suggest only listening to anecdoctal evidence from people who had planned, routine c-sections, and who had one recently. There’s a massive, massive difference between an emergency c-section mid labour, and an elective c-section (and none of the risk stats reflect this). Also, medicine has come a tremendously long way, and the recovery is not nearly as bad as it used to be.

Good luck!

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