Any Tips For Dealing With Sugar Addiction?

posted 2 weeks ago in Wellness
Post # 2
Member
264 posts
Helper bee

Girl I’m with you. I actually just thought today that I need to control this. I have no advice but I’m following for what others have to share!

Post # 3
Member
747 posts
Busy bee

What worked for me was quitting my coke zero addiction. That was the main driver behind my sugar addiciton. The caffiene/sweetness would set off hunger cues and I’d be snacking and craving sugar all day. 

I also try not to have it in the house, or just get enough for one serving. I dont eat any sugar early in the day. If I am going to have a treat, it is after dinner when Ive already had a satiating meal. 

A big thing for me in balancing my blood sugar – not diabetic, but I would get the shakes a LOT – was drinking a lot of water and no caffiene/sugar. Amazingly if I get up and drink 2 bottles of water I am good and dont need to eat until the afternoon. If I also drink 2 bottles of water after dinner I dont crave dessert. I dont think water is “filling” like some people say, but it does seem to quiet my hunger and cravings. 

Post # 5
Member
306 posts
Helper bee

 

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@xiphosura:  I have no specific coping recommendations for dealing with a sugar addiction, but if you find yourself able to, I would look into the Whole 30 diet which is more of a mental diet than a physical diet.  It’s very strict and hard to do, especially if you are dealing with other people in your household that are not on it, but it really helped me reexamine my relationship with food and learn to savor every bite and really appreciate my food. You are eating a whole bag of candy when really that craving you had was likely satisfied by 1 or 2 pieces.

It’s not exactly a diet in that it doesn’t restrict the amount you eat (rather it restricts WHAT you eat).  It’s it’s not specifically geared towards weight loss though it’s usually inevitable becuase you’re usually eating healthier.  It forces you to read all of your labels and really think about what you are putting into your body, why you are putting it into your body, and really gives you some disturbing insight into how sugar really sneaks its way into EVERY. SINGLE. FOOD. Even if you can’t do it for a full 30 days, even 1 or 2 weeks may be beneficial.

The goal after the whole 30 is what they call “food freedom” where you open yourself back up to eating all foods, but feeling less guilty about the choices you make, and understanding that you just because you ate an entire bag of candy one time, that you shouldn’t just do it again becuase why not, you’re already a failure. I have done a Whole 30 a few times when I’ve gotten off track and it has really helped me out.  Even if you don’t think doing one is feasible, it may be worth reading up on it and understanding the principles behind it.  Good luck!

Post # 5
Member
512 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2015 - City, State

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@xiphosura:  That sounds like an addiction alright.  I used to smoke cigarettes, so I can tell you how I beat that addiction.  No. 1–you have to be mentally ready to quit, to deep down really want to do it.  This mindset made me feel slightly disgusted everytime I had a cigaratte.  I felt grosser and grosser every time I smoked.  This allowed me to gradually cut down on how many cigarettes I smoked.  No. 2–the breaking point.  This is the point where I was able to cross into non-addiction mode.  I ended up having a bit of a health scare (not smoking related), but it really made me realize how important health really is and how much damage I was potentially doing to myself.  I think you might be getting there with the cycle of sugar addiction and mental/physical consequences.  After the scare, I dropped smoking like a hot potato–a switch flipped in my head and I was done for good.  It’s been six years and I’ve never gone back!  I’m so glad I quit.

Post # 7
Member
1295 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2018

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@mg8301:  I drink a lot (too much) of Coke Zero. That would be an interesting thing to explore.

 

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@xiphosura:  There’s a book called the Blood Sugar Solution by Dr Mark Hyman. It’s an interesting read, and the book takes you through a 10-day detox but it includes withdrawal symptoms etc so you aren’t unprepared. He has a quiz somewhere, it might be in the back of the book, which asks you to review symptoms and ‘score’ them based on frequency. You may find that thinking about those symptoms and how your diet could be causing them will help motivate you to do something about it.

Personally I am all-or-nothing sweet (currently all) and I feel like I have to give up chocolate completely because I can’t stop if I have even the smallest portion. Given late night convenience stores/24hr supermarkets, it’s all too easy to go buy more if I run out. The hardest part is definitely giving it up in the first place, and after a few days of feeling terrible I’m usually OK, but then I’ve got to make sure I don’t get ill or injured as that tends to set me off again with the comfort eating.

Post # 8
Member
1202 posts
Bumble bee

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@xiphosura:  I get bad sugar cravings because I’m insulin resistant. I also get them when when I’m thirsty. Have you been checked for glucose tolerance? Have your doctor order a 2 hour test. Testing yourself won’t be as accurate because you need to know when your levels spike. Everyone is different. 

Post # 11
Member
512 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2015 - City, State

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@xiphosura:  Yeah, a bunch of my friends still smoke.  But I have no desire to smoke even when I’m around them smoking.  All I can think is “gross” and I see how they are slaves to it and it just looks miserable to me.  Eventually you will see through the glamour.  Your brain is already starting to think of the sugar as “gross.”  Eventually you will just see it as dressed up poison.  You even making this post is a huge step in the right direction!

Post # 12
Member
1202 posts
Bumble bee

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@xiphosura:  Ask for a two hour glucose tolerance test on your next exam. The regular bmp measures glucose, but not insulin spikes. Better safe than sorry, and it’s much easier to control if you catch it early. I’ve lived with it for 20 years now, and I control it with diet and exercise. My sugar cravings return if I slack on exercise, like they did during COVID, for example, when my gym was shut down. 

Post # 14
Member
233 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: City, State

I don’t have a sugar addiction so I can’t speak specifically to how to beat it. But have you tried just not having any of that stuff you crave in the house so you won’t be tempted? Or replace it with healthier options ? For example, if you always crave cookies, look up some healthy low sugar cookie recipes and make your own batch! I understand this would be harder to control in the workplace though. I know for me if there’s a bag of chips in my cupboard I just have to eat the whole thing, that’s why I don’t buy chips lol! 

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