(Closed) Anyone else have a fear of needles?

posted 7 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 16
Member
2511 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

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ForeverBirds:  Wow! That’s intense! I feel bad for you! 

I’m not scared of needles unless they’re going in a weird spot. My arm, fine. My eyeball, not fine. (Thankfully I’ve never experienced that, but I’m sure I’d freak out quite dramatically in such a scenario).

When I went into labor, I had chosen to have an epidural, but was terrified of the needle going into my back. I dreaded the pain (luckily they numbed me & I didn’t feel it) & kept imagining them slipping & paralyzingly me) they didn’t, I can still walk). It’s not something I want to experience again, although it wasnt nearly as bad as I imagined.

Good luck to you & hopefully you will overcome this fear one day.

Post # 17
Member
903 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I cannot do needles. Shots, bloods, spinals, even the little finger prick for glucose readings – cant do em. And go figure i end up in medical school… Lol ive become comfortable (and quite skilled i may add ;)) at giving needles, i just cant take them. Its a legit phobia.

if i have for-warning i use a topical anesthetic like emla. However if its a surprise needle and im not prepared (i.e. In the back of an ambulance, in the er, or an antibiotic shot after surgery that they waited until im fully concious to receive…) well… I dont make the giver’s life easy lol the paramedic was shocked to see my blood pressure and heart rate skyrocket when he pricked my finger in the ambulance… He didnt understand how serious a phobia can be…

Post # 18
Member
2854 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

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ForeverBirds:  I’ve always hated needles, and used to get my blood drawn every 6 months. It was the pits. Have you had them use a butterfly needle on you? It’s the kind they use on kids. Basically instead of the needle being connected right to the container, the needle is connected to a rubber tube that then connects to the container. It’s waaay better than the standard straight needle, because there is a lot less movement of the needle (since they aren’t holding the container that is directly attached to your arm). If you haven’t tried a butterfly needle before, I highly recommend it. A phlebotomist suggested it to me one time, and I’ve been a lot better with getting my blood drawn (don’t feel as likely to pass out after).

If you’ve already tried a butterfly and it doesn’t work…I don’t really have advice, but I definitely sympathize!!

Post # 19
Member
385 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I don’t have a phobia of needles, but I do usually experience a vasovagal response (fainting or nearly fainting) when I get stuck with a needle (or a bee sting, for that matter!)  I’m not afraid of the needle, I’m afraid of that feeling of being hot and nauseous and losing consciousness!  I’m perfectly fine until the needle actually goes in.  So I only get really necessary shots or blood tests (no flu shot for me!)

Consider buying a Buzzy (http://www.amazon.com/Buzzy-Relief-System-Takes-Sting/dp/B004UMOWBM).  It’s supposed to distract your nerves from feeling the needle.  I haven’t tried it myself, just read about it.  Of course, it probably mostly just helps if your fear is about the needle hurting.  If your phobia isn’t due to pain, just fear of needles in general, I don’t know how useful it would be.

Post # 20
Member
11517 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2014

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ForeverBirds:  I’m not afraid of regular needles (although I HATE getting blood work done, my veins are hard to find and it usually ends up being painful) but DENTAL needles send me into a tailspin – I’ve actually done everything imaginable to avoid them since I was 6 years old (not joking)

Post # 21
Member
2087 posts
Buzzing bee

I have a fear of needles, but I am able to manage it if I don’t know when the shot is happening and I don’t look at it.

I have to explain this a lot ahead of time when I’m getting blood work done or getting shots because it’s kind of common practice to have them count down or explain what they’re doing or tell you to breathe a certain way.

I have to say “I have a fear of needles, so I am going to look away and you just do what you need to do and don’t explain it to me or let me know when it’s coming, just do it” Most techs and Drs are fine with that and it seems to go quickly because I don’t have the same anxiety buildup as when they’re like “one, two, three ok little pinch” blah blah

Post # 22
Member
533 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I have a fear of getting my blood drawn. I don’t like needles generally, but I can handle getting a shot. Something about getting my blood drawn… even typing it, I start feeling faint.

Like a lot of posters, I have had terrible experiences because I have small veins. Everytime I get blood drawn I come close to fainting. However, I have been able to avoid fainting by using a few simple techniques. First, tell the blood tech of your phobia, and ask if they have a place you can lie down while they draw your blood. For some reason that helps for me. When I get my blood drawn, I always bring along my husband. Talking to him while my blood is getting drawn definitely helps my nerves. Also, it sounds stupid but be sure to take really deep breaths. That is normally why people faint- they literally get so freaked out that they stop breathing. I also have taken an anti anxiety drug to help. I find it helps me face it a little better, but the fear doesn’t entirely go away. I also normally reward myself with something I really want after getting blood drawn. It helps motivate myself!

Post # 23
Member
47450 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

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ForeverBirds:  There are therapists who can help with phobias. Do some investigation in your locale and find someone who can help you deal with this.

Post # 26
Member
903 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

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ForeverBirds:  its over the counter for sure in canada and the uk, probably the same in the us. its a cream or patch u put on about an hour ahead of time and it completely numbs the area. i keep a stash of them just in case lol

i wouldnt advise seeing a therapist… Ive seen a clinical psychologist for it and his advice was to put myself in a situation where id be getting loads of shots, ie donating blood or using depo shot for contraception… Ya OK buddy! Never gonna happen.

Post # 28
Member
1001 posts
Bumble bee

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ForeverBirds:  Well, I worked in healthcare, but my capacity was not that of a healthcare professional.  If I had contact with a patient who was receiving an injection/IV insertion/blood draw, it was because they were combative.  In those circumstances, they were generally either already in restraints or I would have to place them in restraints, and then I and my partner (work-partner, not romantic-partner) would hold them still so that the healthcare professionals could either give them and injection, do their blood draw, or place their IV, as required.  So there wasn’t a lot of “help the patient feel better about the needle” going on.  Most of these patients were very drunk, or very high on methamphetamine, LSD, or other drugs.  We were holding them still so that they would not injure themselves on the needle, or hurt the healthcare professional.

Post # 29
Member
1149 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

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ForeverBirds:  Agree with the bee who suggested emla, i’ve used it before, I could still feel it a bit but you don’t actually feel the needle going through the skin (sorry that probably totally turned your stomach!)

I never used to have a fear of needles but I found out a few years ago that i’m aneamic and had to have shots (which are pretty painful..) and now I hate them! The first time I had one I passed out afterwards when I stood up which really surprised me! I have the same nurse give me the shots each time and she now gets me to lay down and look the other way, it definitely helps! It stops the light headedness and neusea. Good luck!

  • This reply was modified 6 years, 7 months ago by  Miss_E_xx.
Post # 30
Member
533 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

Well, I think if your fear is this bad, it is worth seeing a well reputed therapist, as another poster suggested. I am sure you could find one who could help you deal with confronting a phobia without suggesting that you seek out situations where you must gets shots or your blood drawn. There are a variety of techniques that can be used.

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