(Closed) Anyone else work in a field that is not encouraging to baby making?

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
126 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2010

Well… my job doesn’t have the same pressure that yours does – I’m a flight attendant.  What I’m worried about is being extra exhausted from being pregnant and flying 3 flights a day with super short overnights… and hormones! and nausea! Ugh.  Makes me wish the whole 9 months of pregnancy was maternity leave…

Post # 4
Member
7082 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

Well, let’s just say that in the next three days, I have to pack my house up, finish a manuscript revision and finalize a renter for my house, all while taking care of my beautiful baby.  Oh and I need to drive to Salt Lake City too.

Yeah, it’s hard but, yeah you can do it! (though I don’t feel like it right this second).

Post # 5
Member
58 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I was so talking about this last night.  My husband and I both work crazy hours and I do quite a bit of work travel. 

The other night we both got home at 9, after a weekend of work travel, and were like, “How are we going to be good parents?”

My hope is that when the time comes, we learn to set priorities and boundaries.  We know many people in our industry who are parents, and they’ve all said it’s about knowing when you have to say “no”.

Post # 7
Member
348 posts
Helper bee

I’m on the job market in academia this year, and it’s true…I don’t want a baby right away, but I don’t want to wait seven years necessarily.  But I do know people who have had babies before tenure and it’s worked out ok.  I think it all depends on the specific department (how supportive people are) and also how much your husband is really willing to do.  Mine definitely knows to expect to do more than 50% of the childcare until I get tenure.

Post # 8
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

Well, on a slightly different note, but still related- I am a fine art photographer.  It is my absolute life.  The traveling, and the dark room.  Unfortunately- the chemicals are absolutely TOXIC to a developing fetus.  Absolutely toxic.  In a public darkroom, safety training forbids anyone that is even thinking about becoming pregnant to be there.  I will have to make as much work as I can to build stock in order to take a whole year- (or more?  If we have two children) off from my work.  :/

Post # 9
Member
82 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I had to leave my job when I got married because we planned to start trying for a baby and I could not work in the field I was in if I got pregnant.  I was a vet tech so I couldn’t do x-ray, surgeries or anything like that… So, I just gave up trying to find a “in the meantime” job and started my own business. So much better than getting up early and driving to work when I have a 10 foot commute now to my computer. 

Post # 11
Member
58 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

My dad and I were on the phone the other day and he realized I didn’t plan on being a stay at home mom.  It was a very awkward moment. He gave me a lecture about what kids need, and it was a really demoralizing conversation.  I’ve worked very hard on building my career (just got promoted to VP, yeay!), and I can’t see just abandoning it.  My mom stayed at home, and now that we’re grown, she has confessed several times that she felt like she missed out on her own life and being her own person (quite a bummer to hear).

Fortunately my workplace is very kid-friendly, and we have an amazing on-site daycare, so I hope that will help when the time comes. 

Congrats on your job, btw!!!

 

Post # 12
Member
2695 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

Yeah, well my job def. got in the way of conception to start! I ended up spending a lot of time in Asia right after we decided to start TTC so that got delayed a bit.  However, unlike many women in my field, I was not going to plan our family around my job promotions.  For most people in my job, hours are a minimum of 60 hours a week and there is a lot of travel – for most of the last 6 years I have probably spent 60% of my work days out of town.

I highly doubt I will stay after my leave is up as I don’t intend to have kids and then never be around.  Even those women in my company on part time still probably work at least 50 hours a week.

I have no idea what is next as there aren’t too many 40-hour week jobs in the field I am in (never mind true part time).  But I am not worried, we will figure it out!!  Having kids means I have placed a priority on them over my job and I am very comfortable with that.

Post # 14
Member
7082 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

troubled- I’m starting a new job in September, and though I’ll still be working crazy hours, the hospital is helping me out by having many of the hours be overnights (so that I can spend time with baby during the day).  Plus one overnight at our hospital will count for a week of regular work.  That means more time with family!

Post # 16
Member
1079 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I’m in academia as well (research post-doc). Women I know who have kids just decided to go for it. My advisor is pre-tenure, had a baby as a postdoc and another one 6 months ago. One faculty member in the dept is pregnant with her fourth. Splitting a position with Fiance sounds good right now since we’re in the same field. There are a bunch of blogs devoted to female science faculty with kids – they keep me going (FSP, JanusProfessor, twobodyproblem). It helps if you can find a dept with a friendly chair. Are you in grad school right now? Have a kid now. No one cares if you take an extra year for grad school.

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