(Closed) Anyone using a midwife?

posted 6 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
2539 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

Im not preggo yet but my GYNO has a midwife in the office. I have the same philosophy as you however with my son, the doctor intervened more than i would have liked and I had an epi and pitocin.

Next baby I’m going to make sure people listen to me! lol

Post # 4
Member
607 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

I agree with your philosophy and will use a midwife when the time comes. I’m sure OB practices are very used to people switching around in the beginning. I would just ask around and do some googling. Around me, a lot of hospitals have birthing centers with midwives attached– like, in the same building, with OBs who are connected with it, but unless there are complications the midwives are the ones who deliver the baby. Usually they have more of the alternative type things like tubs, birthing balls, etc, than a normal labor and delivery floor does. 

For me, it will be important to be either in or very close to a regular hospital in case emergency interventions are needed, but I’d prefer to be with midwives as well. 

Post # 5
Member
1820 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I am not KU, but plan to use a hospital-based midwifery practice when I am.  (It’s really competitive, so my husband and I already attended their “Meet the Midwives” event and got on their email roll so that we will be accepted into their practice when the time comes.)  I chose this route because, like you, I believe that my body was made for this and I want to go through the entire process (prenatal and cb) with someone who I trust to make as few interventions as possible.  Plus, I am absolutely *terrified* of having a cs.  That said, I have no desire to birth at home and really like the idea of being in a hospital in case something goes wrong/I decide I want the epi/my baby needs immediate care, etc. 

You should think about what your ideal birth looks like (hospital/center/home, no interventions at all/some interventions/ability to have interventions if you change your mind, etc.) and then research a practice that fits that ideal. 

Post # 6
Member
554 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I’m using an OB but also paying out of pocket for a doula who has the same philosphy about birth as I do and will help me through the process. I was nervous to chose a midwife through our hospital as you never know who you’re going to get when you actually go into labor (same wiht the OB). By having a doula, I know she will be the one supporting me when the time comes and that means a lot to me. 

Post # 7
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I’m not pregnant (or even TTC) but I love reading these posts because it I’m in the UK and it is expected that you will give birth naturally, with only a midwife unless you need medical intervention or are a high risk pregnancy. Usually you just go to your local birthing centre or hospital maternity department to give birth, unless you choose to give birth at home (which is rare).

Is it so different in America? is it unusual to give birth in a midwife run centre? I’m just curious to see how differently it all works over there

Post # 8
Member
60 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I am using a midwife practice.  I basically did some research and found the midwives in my area (there were 2 practices) then went with the one who was part of my insurance plan.  There are I believe 6 midwives in this specific practice, and they deliver at a hospital so in my opinion it is the best of both worlds.  If at any point during the pregnancy I need to consult with an OB they do have a practice they work closely with.  The OB would see me and prescibe a course of action that the midwives would then follow.  On their own the midwives prescribe medication, see you at all visits, and have a more relaxed (but not in any way neglectful) view of pregnancy and birth.  I have been offered all the same tests and information as friends who have used an OB.  I am so, so, so happy I am with them, and even my husband who was very trepidatious at first loves them and the level of care I am receiving.  Good luck!

Post # 9
Member
607 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@Sibiohan:  I think midwives are becoming a lot more common in the US, but a lot of people still think midwives are only for ‘super nature-loving, tree-hugging hippie types’. I have several friends who wanted to go with midwives and had to convince their husbands that this didn’t mean they would be having the baby at home in the bath tub (not that there is anything wrong with that, if that’s what you want!). It’s not just really the norm, yet. I haven’t look at any statistics or anything, but I think the majority of babies in the US are born in a regular hospital setting with an OB. We do have a pretty high c-section rate here too. 

Post # 10
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@foodnerd81:  I watched one episode of one born every minute USA and was surprised by the differences between here and there. Not that all this differences are bad, for example over here it is very hard to get an epidural even if you want one which I don’t think is right. The episode I watched had a woman who wanted to give birth naturally, but the medics seemed to be trying to push her towards intervention even though there was nothing going wrong with the birth – just because she was making noise and it was taking a long time. I know it must be stylised for “good TV”, but it still surprised me that that sort of pushyness would exist, especially since you have to pay for it over there.

Post # 11
Member
2410 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

@Sibiohan:  I’m from the UK originally but now living in the US, and yes the systems are very different. The main reason for the difference is the fact there is universal healthcare in the UK and not here. Midwifery is the default option in the UK.

Everyone uses a midwife and only sees the OB if there are complications. Over here however everyone sees a doctor and a lot of insurance carriers will not cover use of a midwife. 

At the risk sounding cynical, the UK system is designed save the NHS as much money as possible and the US system is designed to generate as much income as possible.

Post # 12
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@plantains:  Definitely to save money over this side of the pond, though I think midwives do a great job!

Post # 14
Member
1820 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@mrsmjm:  Midwives can absolutely practice on their own in the US.

Post # 16
Member
2603 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@septcabride:  Yes. Mrsmjm, I think that the issue isn’t that they have to practice with a physician in order to practice; they might have to do so in order to be covered by insurance. THAT’s the issue. Most hospital births are over $10K in costs, but if you have health insurance, you won’t see that cost. Most home births are between $3-5K, all of which you will be likely to pay out of pocket.

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