(Closed) Anyone using a midwife?

posted 8 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 32
Member
71 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

My practice has OB’s and midwives. I’ve seen the midwives 3 or 4 times and the OB once. I have mixed feelings about who I prefer for my prenatal care, but I’m pretty certain that I will go with the midwives for delivery unless there are complications. I found the practice by figuring out which hospital I wanted to deliver at and researching midwife practices that deliver there. I know of a few women using this practice (they have several locations in the area) so I figured I’d try it out. So far I’ve been extremely satisfied. I guess best bet is just to ask around. We have some pregnancy boards on a local website so I asked for opinions on my practice once I was pretty certain about it.

I’m really glad that my practice has both midwives and OB’s because I’ve had spotting since about 13 weeks. I was checked out by a midwife initially and she found a cervical polyp and attributed it to that. Normally I’d be fine with that explanation but I had a previous m/c that presented as spotting and a LEEP last year which could result in cervical incompetence that could also present as spotting. When I saw the OB last week, she voiced the same concerns as me (how do I know it’s just the polyp and not something else) and scheduled me for periodic ultrasounds. I know it’s totally personal and although I do agree that pregnancy is a natural process and should be treated that way, I need extra reassurance from an OB when things are not completely normal.

ETA: My opinion is based on my experience so far in Massachusetts with CNM’s. There are midwives that are not necessarily CNM’s and may not be subject to strict standards. Also here, CNM’s are only allowed to deliver in hospitals or risk losing their licenses. Most were previously delivery nurses. I think when people talk about midwives, there is such a huge range of comes to mind.

Post # 33
Member
1041 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

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@fivemonthsnotice: I’m sorry you had such a horrible experience with a midwife.  I did just want to point out that in the US (I’m not sure of the requirements in Canada) CNM’s go to 6-8 years of school, plus experience in between. This includes 4 years of undergraduate nursing school, typically 1-2 years of nursing experience, about 2 years of master’s school, and then 2 years of doctorate school. Doctorate school is not a requirement yet, but will be in a few years unless the midwife is being grandfathered in. It doesn’t lessen the mistakes made by your midwife, but I wanted other bees to know that if you are thinking of going with a CNM they are not necessarily poorly educated. 

Post # 34
Member
60 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

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@cobalt21:  

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@fivemonthsnotice:  

 

I don’t think you were getting flamed, but also both of you said you wanted an OB so you would be in the hospital if anything happens….many midwives (mine included) deliver IN the same hospital rooms, with the same medical equipment available to patients of OBs.  There is an OB on call at all times to do any c-section or any consultation necessary.  I think that is where the lines are getting crossed.  We actually have the same standard of care with the same tools available (including epidurals!).  It is merely a difference in caregiver philosophy/bedside manner.

Post # 35
Member
59 posts
Worker bee

Hi, Girls

I am not TTC or anything but saw this post and had a few questions…

If at the hospital you can have a natural delivery AND you can refuse drugs, what is the advantage of giving birth  with  midwife at a hospital??? Isn’t it the same then ???

And isn’t then better to have an MD do it???

I thaught that the whole idea of having a midwife was to be able to deliver in the comfort of your own home…

Isn’t it counter-intuitive than to have it at hospital?

I am confused…

Post # 36
Member
60 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

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@molly_brown:  If you are high risk or have any problems that require a c-section an MD will do it.  I chose to go with a midwife because of a few main reasons:  1.  I definitely get mroe time with them at each visit, do not feel rushed, and do not wait foever in the waiting room before appointments.  It is a more personal level of care.  2.  I am having a very normal pregnancy with no complications getting pregnant or anything unusual or irregular happen.  I am assuming my delivery will be more of the same, (although maybe not easy!).  3.  The OB/GYN I was going to before I got pregnant induces if you go more than a couple days past your due date.  More than half of my friends have gotten induced and have then had a c-section due to failed inductions…I wanted the flexibility to go a little longer than a couple days before induction if everything is fine with the baby. 

I really wanted an experience with a practitioner who was caring and gave a more personal level of care.  If my OB was more like that or other OBs in my area I may not have switched.  The midwives I am using have come very highly recommended and also do standard yearly exams as well so I will be continuing with them after I deliver.

In short, the experience I am looking for/getting by using a midwife may be similar to someone else with a more relaxed OB in a smaller practice. 

Post # 37
Member
2599 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

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@fivemonthsnotice:  I’m really sorry that that happened to you–it shouldn’t have, and I can understand your suspicion of the profession because of it.

However, as I understand it based on my friends’ experiences with midwifery (and granted, this too, is anecdotal), it’s a little strange that you were able to get a midwife to see you outside of a hospital for the third birth because you hemorraged with your second birth and because you seemed to be having some difficulty in the last month with your third. I’ve got friends who saw midwives and were told that the midwife wouldn’t allow them to birth at home or at a birthing center because one was nearing 40 and the other had a previous c-section. I don’t know the details beyond that, but basically the midwife determined they were already “high risk.”

I think that in general, I would like to see the practice of midwifery revived. I have nothing against obstetrics–I see an OBGYN and NOT a midwife (in part b/c insurance won’t cover it), but I think that overall it’s a field that is biased towards finding pathology and fixing problems. This is a great thing. However, the majority of births are not with major problems and childbirth is not a pathology. Our emphasis on childbirth in hospitals has lent to a loss of knowledge as to how to have a safe, natural birth. It’s also sort of scary that the US has among the highest rates of maternal mortality–which is growing, and the growth correlates to the decline of midwifery.

 

Post # 38
Member
9816 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@molly_brown:  

If at the hospital you can have a natural delivery AND you can refuse drugs, what is the advantage of giving birth  with  midwife at a hospital??? Isn’t it the same then ???

It’s not about getting an advantage by where you deliver, it’s about choosing what you want your birth experience to be. If you’re having a low risk, perfectly normal pregnancy, there is no reason to adhere to some of the policies that are more in tune with an OB (induction after a week past the due date, some say too quick to induce/offer c-sections). My midwives emphasize and go for natural treatments first for example (drinking water, lying in certain positions, massage) where my doctors were quicker to give out meds.

And isn’t then better to have an MD do it???

Again, it’s not “better” just different depending on what you’re looking for in a birthing experience. Some argue that MDs tend to treat pregnancy more like an “illness” and while I don’t totally agree with that, I am definitely enjoying the “Let nature do it’s thing” mentality this time around.

I thaught that the whole idea of having a midwife was to be able to deliver in the comfort of your own home…

Nope, I’ll have my Midwife with me at the hospital I will be delivering at, they work right along with the OBs in my practice.

Isn’t it counter-intuitive than to have it at hospital?

Why would it be? Not everyone wants a home birth for their non medicated birth, I sure as hell don’t! 🙂 

Post # 39
Member
2599 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

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@molly_brown:  

(I wanted to go the midwife route but can’t, so you’re hearing the results of my research, not my experience, NB):

If at the hospital you can have a natural delivery AND you can refuse drugs, what is the advantage of giving birth  with  midwife at a hospital??? Isn’t it the same then ???

One thing that’s often cited is that the midwife will help you through a natural process if you want it to be that way, and s/he can advocate on your behalf and because she can help you through the process.

Also, there are studies that show trends in hospitals that are…unsettling. For example, the rate of C-sections increase at 4pm and at 10pm. Why? Because the doc wants to be home before dinner and/or doesn’t want to be up all night. So they might rush a woman into a c-section that she might not need simply because of that. Now that’s a very cynical example and I don’t want to denigrade ALL of obstetrics. What’s more probable is that an OBGYN, in part because of the pressure of malpractice insurance, wants to have complete control over the birth. And for the OBGYN, the procedure that will provide that is surgery, or a c-section. So again, there is some incentive–which is perfectly reasonable–to perform a medical intervention, even when it’s not necessary. And finally, some friends reported that the midwife helped them understand the process of birth better–that the pain was productive and not something to fear, for example. That doesn’t mean that the midwife was anti-drugs, but simply that it was a different person and a different perspective to have at your birth than a member of the medical staff that would probably say, “Oh, you’re in pain? Would you like an epidural?” Not saying one is better than the other, but that it’s a matter of preference and some people want the encouragement more than they want the fix in that situation.

And isn’t then better to have an MD do it???

In what sense? I have an MD who has been in practice for 30 years, which is a lot. But in some cases, the midwife might very well have more experience with a natural birth than the MD–some MDs have far, far more experience with Caesarians and drugs, which is great if you need or want those things, but if you don’t, you might have a doctor who hasn’t actually seen very many unassisted births.

I thaught that the whole idea of having a midwife was to be able to deliver in the comfort of your own home…

For some, yes, but others really do just want someone to help them through the process in a more personal way.

Isn’t it counter-intuitive than to have it at hospital?

See above.

 

Post # 40
Member
5654 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2011

@mrsmjm:  I had a Certified Professional Midwife and she was WONDERFUL! She was knowledgable in not only the natural process of pregnancy and birthing, but also in natural remedies for can arise. ie. She put me on calcium magnesium vitamin spray for my blood pressure as opposed to other meds…. the calmag worked great and is a natural supplement!

You can find midwives that deliver in hospitals, birthing centers, and at home. You want to find a midwife that has a lot of experience being the primary care provider and has a record you’re comfortable with, along with availability to birth where you are wanting to birth. (Not all midwives will do a homebirth and not all midwives are cleared with hospitals)

Here’s a pretty thorough questionaire for interviewing a midwife =)

Oh.. I just saw that you found a midwifery practice that you’re going to have a consultation with… yay! Hope the questionaire is helpful in your interviewing process.

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@cobalt21:  I had a homebirth and yes I did transfer in the end (partly becuase of my own inability to do what was needed to stable my progression… I was kinda forgetting to breathe. lol), BUT my midwife was just as good if not better than previous M.D.’s I’ve had… definitely more knowledgable in natural childbirth than 99% of the M.D.’s I’ve met & spoken with. She continually assessed my status WITHOUT unneeded in your face intervetion & made the call when she was no longer confortable with my progession. In 20 years and over 800 births she’s NEVER lost a mom or baby, only needed to use CPR on one baby (which had down syndrome so he just needed more help along), only needs to transfer 1 laboring mom every 3-5 years, and has had only ONE mom with a 4th degree tear. She’s delivered twins, breech babies, vbac, ftm, stm, and everything in between.

Yes there are midwives that have no business taking on homebirths or any births as the primary care provider and bad things happen sometimes regardless of licensure or education, but with a good sensible interviewing process it is very possible to find a midwife (CPM or LM) that is more than qualified to provide a low risk mom a wonderful delivery.

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@fivemonthsnotice:  Wow! Thank God you and your lo were okay! My midwife and I were actually talking about the whole needed u/s and intervetion that some midwives won’t do. She was infuriated when reading some midwives think u/s in general are crazy & was very vocal about the fact that it’s dumb things like that that give midwives a bad name. You should’ve definitely had an u/s ordered and they should have looked into your concern, whether they thought things were normal or not considering your history. I can definitely see why you would not be for using a midwife again!

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@KatyElle:  I concur 100%

Post # 41
Member
177 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

in the uk we dont use doctors unless medical intervention is necessary – it means most labour wards are run by midwifes, with a few drs to make sure everything goes ok when issues arise  – in fact i’ve not even spoken to a doctor abut my pregnancy yet and i’m 24 weeks!

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