Article about Millenials and Diamonds

posted 3 years ago in Engagement
Post # 16
Member
1767 posts
Buzzing bee

I find it interesting that millenials I talk with say they’re against diamonds because of capitalism, diamonds are just rocks and not worth the inflated cost, they’re poor and value life experiences like traveling more than material goods. I agree these reasons are justified…BUT ask someone who is antidiamond in my generation (X) and they’ll scream “I DONT WANT A BLOOD DIAMOND LOOMING OVER MY MARRIAGE!” We watched the news expose the horrors of diamond mining in Africa, and the anger is real. I said this is interesting because millenials are always calling out bad companies and bad ethics on social media, they’ll take up any&every cause. But I’ve never heard them use the term “blood diamond” when discussing engagement rings. I used the term talking to some millenials at an engagement party (she didn’t have a diamond) and they got really uncomfortable and said I’m wasn’t being politically correct lol Regardless of their reasons, I’m glad they’re helping destroy a corrupt industry.

Post # 17
Member
970 posts
Busy bee

Many people I went to school with are in huge student loan debt and still insist on a diamond. We’re talking, willing to wait to get engaged for a few years because only a diamond will do.

In other areas I think millenials are much more thrifty because of their student loan debt and how difficult it is to afford a house these days, but for some reason it seems in my circle people are just absolutely not willing to sacrifice on their engagement ring.

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with having a strong preference for diamond, but I do think it’s weird to wait to get married because you want a ring you can’t afford. 

We chose to get an alternative ring. I think for me I felt it was kind of a gift to us to say “let’s not start our new life together in any more debt than we are now.”

I’m an engineer, and I thought lab created diamonds were the coolest thing when I learned about them in class. That probably predisposed me to not minding lab created stones as an alternative.

Post # 18
Member
453 posts
Helper bee

I remember seeing a similar article a little while ago and one of the comments was “I work in a grocery store.” This applies to my friend group, as well, since most of my friends are barely scooting by just above the poverty line, living with their parents, dealing with massive amounts of student debt and these are all issues that were no where near as prevalent with previous generations as with this one. So, yeah, I can see millenials turning away from diamonds if for no other reason than they’re priced artifically high and that money needs to go other places for us.

Like another one of these articles I remember seeing was “Millenials spell the doom of the fabric softener industry” and it’s like yeah, a lot of people my age don’t see the point of buying something just to make clothes softer when that’s money that can be put to better use elsewhere, like feeding or housing me because every penny counts in this economic situation.

Post # 21
Member
58 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2019

I would have to say my peer group (millinials) are a very mixed bag. I know several people with alternative engagement ring options like a lab sapphire, but I also know people who insist on diamonds. One friend insists on getting a ring she doesn’t care for because it is the only diamond her boyfriend can afford over a non diamond ring she loves.  I will say, I think some of it has to do with how and where you grown up, and what the norm is in that situation. 

Post # 23
Member
6425 posts
Bee Keeper

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aimerxoxo :  i can’t spit without hitting a millennial with a diamond ring but that’s where I live. I’m one of the very few that has a non diamond center 

Post # 24
Member
930 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2017

Diamonds are the norm amongst my social group. I believe I’m the only one with a non diamond center although my wedding band is diamonds and his wedding band has diamonds in it. 

I simply refused to let him spend that much money on a diamond for me when we could spend that money traveling or investing it into something else. Same reason for why we are having a small wedding. I was thrilled to find out about moissanite and have loved it since I saw one in person. I would never say I will never own a diamond center stone though. 

People go into debt over diamonds all the time. I have a co worker that bought his fiancé a $10,000 ring from Kay Jewelers and has spent the past few years paying it off..I believe he is almost done. He makes less than 50k and she is finishing up school. He desperately needs a new car but can’t afford one until he finishes paying off the ring. 🤦🏻‍♀️

Post # 25
Member
3009 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

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aimerxoxo :  I definitely agree with the point in this article that “millenials tend to spend on experiences rather than luxury items”. As a 24 year old (from Southern Ontario, Canada) the majority of my friends and aquantainces (on social media and real life) show off much more about travelling and having interesting experiences/excusions, and rarely ever about luxury items. I think that a lot of people (at least in my area/culture) would consider showing off luxury items like diamonds to reflect very poorly on them as braggy and materialistic. I feel like the new source of envy and “goals” for my generation is the person who randomly moves to Australia to pick fruit and travel constantly while living in a hostel, not the person who sits at home accumulating material items. 

I am the first of my friend group to get engaged, and my ring is a sapphire. When I showed it to my close friends for the first time, we got into a discussion on how none of us would “ever want/buy a diamond ring”. Not saying that other people my age wouldn’t, maybe its just my social group but one of my friends summed it up pretty well with diamonds being “boring, too expensive and (often) unethical”. 

I think a lot more people are finally opening their eyes and becoming aware of the unethical, ridiculously inflated, DeBeers created market, more than previous generations. 

Post # 26
Member
318 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

I m only the second one of my friends to be engaged but I always new I wanted a gemstone ring and not a diamond and my friends feel the same towards diamonds. I find them much more unique and a better price for what you get.

Post # 27
Member
335 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

I’m a bit older than millennial (tail end of Gen X), but I’ve never really understood why people who claim to be horrified by the ethics of diamonds flock to these diamond-like simulents and alternatives.  If you want to break the back of the demand for diamonds for ethical reasons, wouldn’t a clearly non-diamond stone be a better strategy?  Something with color, or no stone at all, or no ring at all (because no one really *needs* one) or some such?  Giant moissanite stones that most people can’t tell aren’t diamonds sort of perpetuates the industry you claim to be opposing; it even drives up demand for bigger and bigger diamonds to “keep up.”  Or so it seems to me.  There are tons of great reasons to pick an alternative yet diamond-like stone, but being horrified by the diamond industry doesn’t really seem like one of them.

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janna121215 :  I don’t think you meant it this way, but it sounds like you’re saying only poor uneducated (and presumably not “progressive” enough) types are dumb enough to buy diamonds.  That’s both classist and condescending.

 

Post # 28
Member
428 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2017 - State Park

The broad range that = millennial makes this tough. As an older millennial, upper middle class, I’m the only one of my friends with natural diamond, and I ONLY have it because I inherited my mom’s ring. Everyone either has lab created or gemstone. Everyone has serious concerns about the ethics of the diamond industry. Also none are the type to follow tradition for tradition’s sake. If it weren’t for my mom’s ring, I’d have gone with lab created gemstone. I’m still considering it for my wedding band!

While I’m sure money is a factor – houses and med school aren’t going to pay for themselves – I think that’s secondary to ethics.

Everyone about my age at work though has either diamonds or something I can’t recognize as not-diamond. Could be lab created, but I suspect not. 

Post # 29
Member
3264 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2017

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professorplum : you sad: “I’ve never really understood why people who claim to be horrified by the ethics of diamonds flock to these diamond-like simulents and alternatives.  If you want to break the back of the demand for diamonds for ethical reasons, wouldn’t a clearly non-diamond stone be a better strategy?  Something with color, or no stone at all, or no ring at all (because no one really *needs* one) or some such?  Giant moissanite stones that most people can’t tell aren’t diamonds sort of perpetuates the industry you claim to be opposing; it even drives up demand for bigger and bigger diamonds to “keep up.”  Or so it seems to me.  There are tons of great reasons to pick an alternative yet diamond-like stone, but being horrified by the diamond industry doesn’t really seem like one of them.”

 

Agree with you.   Someone I know with a moissanite center stone, obviously bought it for the usual reasons: large size/low price, as there are diamonds in her setting..

Post # 30
Member
9581 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2015

Aside from the aesthetics and tradition, I support ethical diamonds because I don’t think it’s doing Africa any favors to “destroy” the demand for their most lucrative export. More money going to back to those communities, fairer labor laws and transparency, continued reform and supporting companies who go beyond the Kimberley Process is an ethical choice to me! I do understand how some want lab stones because they want to impact the earth as little as possible. The “good deed” is a wash though if the metal is not recycled and it’s in a diamond setting IMO.

The “only because deBeers marketing” thing is overdone to me. Diamonds have been used in Jewelry (along with other stones of course) since antiquity. A clever slogan in the 1930s did not invent the diamond engagement ring. Besides that, every product on this earth is marketed to us- the consumers decide what is worth it to them. If the *product* satisfies, people keep buying. They are beautiful and the hardest mineral- that’s not a marketing lie. 

I think diamond/not is more about the regional culture than the age group. My Midwest friends… there’s one petite diamond halo and the rest have inexpensive gemstones. They are frugal natured, not at all into status things. NYC/Long Island LOL! Different story. 

And sidenote I CANNOT WAIT until the next generation has a catchy name so people can stop writing stupid trend pieces about millennials ruining abcxyz. 

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