Article about Millenials and Diamonds

posted 3 years ago in Engagement
Post # 31
Member
1536 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

View original reply
yupmarried :  it depends wholly on whether the diamond was ethically sourced. 

I’m UK based and I guess the assumption is that if you have a rock on your engagement ring it MUST be diamond. I only learned about mossianites  (sp) when I came on here. One person does have a sapphire though. 

Post # 32
Member
1241 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I mostly know upper middle class and above people (sorry!) and I know at least a handful of people who chose gemstones as engagment rings. Their desire didn’t have to do anything with cost…they wanted something that was unique and with diamond being the most common engagement ring, the thinking is that that’s not unique. Most people got diamonds, though.

I live in a big city so my friends are just now starting to get engaged/married, and while I think most of them will still go with a diamond, I also think that gemstones have become a lot more acceptable to this generation. And I think that partly because of people wanting to be unique and also because gemstone rings are seen more. I don’t remember seeing gemstone engagement rings on celebrities growing up, but there are a handful of celebrities/famous people who opted for gemstones, like: Kate Middleton, Halle Berry, Penelope Cruz, Eva Longoria, Jessica Simpson, Zoe Saldana, Priscilla Chan, etc. 

In other aspects of life as well, younger people tend to want to be unique, like choosing baby names for their children, so I can’t say that it surprises me that my generation might increasingly go for something that is non-traditional.

I tend to either record shows on a DVR and skip through commercials or I watch them through online platforms like HBO, Hulu, Netflix, Amazon, individual TV provider websites. And I have to say that I have never seen any of these diamond ad campagins. Part of it is because I watch many less commercials now, and part of it is because I’d guess they’re not really going big with these commercials, considering I have never seen them.

View original reply
MrsBuesleBee :  I’m not going to say “only” because of DeBeers marketing at this point in time, because diamonds have been seen as the standard for an engagement ring for 70-80 years, but you can’t deny that historically DeBeers marketing was the primary factor that increased popularity of diamond engagement rings in the 1940s+. 

Sure, diamonds and diamond engagement rings existed before then, but diamonds decreased in popularity from the 1870s until DeBeers’ started a new ad campaign in 1939 and culminated in the 1948 “A Diamond is Forever” campaign, which influenced people to such a degree that it made diamonds the standard for an engagement ring, which was not the case before.

So no, it’s not “only” because of DeBeers’ marketing that people choose engagement rings now, but that ad campagin had such a huge influence historically with repopularizing the diamond and making it THE thing to get after 70 years of decreased popularity.

Post # 33
Member
1241 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

View original reply
becks90 :  I’m surprised to hear that gemstones are not at all popular in the UK because your royal family has a long history of using gemstone engagement rings as well as diamonds (not just talking about Diana/Kate here).

http://orderofsplendor.blogspot.com/2013/02/flashback-friday-british-engagement.html

http://orderofsplendor.blogspot.com/2013/02/flashback-friday-british-engagement_8.html

I guess maybe the royal family doesn’t have that much of an influence on the British people (I wouldn’t know), but I always assumed that they had an influence on style at least. Kind of like celebrities.

Post # 34
Member
2605 posts
Sugar bee

I’m 26 and I don’t know a ton of young married people (I’m in an area where it’s uncommon to get married until your 30s), but the ones I do know have diamonds. That said, at least several of these are vintage/antique diamond rings and they are on the more modest size (mostly under .5 carats). I’ve also seen some bigger rocks that I’d guess are heirloom pieces. I think it makes sense that young people are buying fewer new diamonds though, mostly because of price — a lot of millenials lost valuable working years to the Recession and are saddled with student debt, so I don’t think our generation as a whole has the same buying power at a young age that our parents in the 80s/90s & grandparents in the 50s/60s had. 

Post # 35
Member
459 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2016

I honestly don’t know a single person in my social group who has something other than a diamond. I don’t even think they know what an alternative is, other than CZ. I personally always wanted a diamond. 

Post # 36
Member
1128 posts
Bumble bee

View original reply
aimerxoxo :  I’m born in 1889 and I’m still into diamonds, but I also think I tend to go in the opposite direction of most “milennials”

Post # 37
Member
425 posts
Helper bee

View original reply
megrays :  Can you please tell me the secret to living to be 128? 😉

Post # 38
Member
1128 posts
Bumble bee

View original reply
milena :  omg! *1989

 

Tretinoin.

Post # 39
Member
638 posts
Busy bee

I’m almost too old to be a millennial, but among my peers diamonds are still the norm.  Most of us didn’t have student loans and are settled into professional careers are as our partners.  Going into debt over a ring would be far more taboo than the style of an engagement ring.  

Post # 40
Member
433 posts
Helper bee

My peer group is a mixture but I would say most go with a gemstone other than a diamond. I think only a couple of my engaged friends have diamond rings, the rest have moissanites or sapphires or other alternative stones. I know for myself personally I would never want a diamond. I don’t have anything against them per se (well, the unethical ones yes but you can get ethical diamonds) I just find them to cost more than they are worth. If you have the money to spend and you want a diamond, sure go ahead, but for me and most of my peers we have other things we would prefer to spend money on. 

Post # 41
Member
1170 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2017

View original reply
professorplum :  
View original reply
mrstodd2bee :  As someone who went with moissanite, I can say that I did so for a variety of reasons. Price was one, as I value spending money on other things than just jewelry (and I LOVE my jewelry). However, I will also say that when someone gushes over my ring, I tell them that it’s moissanite for the same reasons you posted. They clearly love it, so why not explain what it is and how they can get it, too? 😁 this just happened this week at a work conference and these two ladies with pretty huge rings (one was at LEAST a 3.5ct solitaire) started asking me about my ring and telling me how gorgeous it was, flashing and sparkling at them all morning. I explained moissanite and they were both saying how they wish they’d known about it when they got engaged and were going to tell their husbands about it. Then, another random lady on the elevator piped up that she has Moissy earrings. I think it’s great to educate people on what the options are out there, and you can still have a beautiful clear/white stone without buying into the diamond industry. 

I’ve seen a mixture in my friend group. Some colored gemstones and some diamond alternatives. Some who have diamonds who wish they’d known there were nice alternatives out there. I agree with those saying that economics have a lot to do with it. It’s a fact that our middle class is shrinking and the economic divide between the poor and wealthy is growing, at least in the US. 

Post # 42
Member
7898 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

I was born in the 70’s, so I’m Gen X and I think the main reason there may be a shift away from diamonds is the advent of the internet and all the choices and opportunities it brings. When I was graduating college and getting engaged (first marriage) the internet was hardly a thing- like email basically. But no amazon, etsy, Pinterest. So you went to a jewelry store in the mall or had something commissioned by a private jeweler. But now anyone can browse stones/settings from around the world. The internet has brought more choices.

Post # 43
Member
1241 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

One more thing. People assume that gemstones are cheaper than diamonds, but that’s not always true. A gorgeous gemstone can be just as expensive, if not more, than a diamond.

View original reply
eeniebeans :  Yes, this is where I was getting with my names example…I didn’t explain it but it’s the same thing. People are exposed to so many more names these days, and want something unique to represent the individuality of their kids. So they go out and seek more rare things with the internet at their disposal. I believe that trend is similar to people seeking out new gems or different setting these days, so I’m honestly not surprised.

Post # 44
Member
246 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2017

My group of friends is a mixture of social classes. Those of us who are married/engaged are pretty evenly split between diamonds, other stones, and no stones. There are just so many other options now. Of course people are going to take advantage of that. 

Something else to consider is that same-sex marriage is a thing, now. There are women getting engaged that don’t want a feminine ring. Men’s engagement rings naturally won’t be boasting a high diamond on a thin little band. I know a solitare diamond ring would make me look way gayer than I’m prepared to be irl.

Post # 45
Member
853 posts
Busy bee

View original reply
professorplum :  Hello, thanks for your input. I didn’t mean it that way at all–I was just sharing what I notice in my social group and added in their economic standing, because that is clearly part of the article and discussion. Clearly I did not intend to suggest that only people living in poverty buy diamonds–I’m sure we could all name quite a few celebrities with $5 million rocks on their fingers.

In the USA, in order to have a salary that’s $100,000 or more, it probably means that you have the student loans for medical school, law school, graduate school or a PhD program. That’s just the reality. The Baby Boomers didn’t have this kind of student debt because education wasn’t nearly as expensive then as it is now. Student loan debt, along with the Recession, are declining diamond sales. If you didn’t go to college, then you won’t have student loan debt and maybe you therefore you see spending differently or you are able to have different spending habits.

I haven’t conducted nor read any research on this exact topic, so I couldn’t say for sure. Just sharing and hypothesizing.

Leave a comment


Find Amazing Vendors