(Closed) Baby Names: The Latest Partisan Divide?

posted 6 years ago in Babies
Post # 4
Member
7424 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

It is very interesting.  I love statistics like this.  Especially the part about how decades ago the percentage of children with the top names was so much greater than it is today for the top names (25% vs. 8%).

Post # 5
Member
2411 posts
Buzzing bee

I find this very interesting and true. As someone who grew up in the Northeast I’m used to (and like) traditional names. The names I hear out here in the Midwest are different than I’m used to and aren’t to my liking. 

Post # 7
Member
802 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@mrsSonthebeach:  “look at me. I’m a post with no comments. weeeeeeeeeee.”


that just made my whole day.

Post # 9
Member
7424 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

My oldest daughter is named Olivia, which is in the top 5, but she does not have any in her classes and we don’t know any other ones.  So just because it is popular, it doesn’t mean the same thing as it used to in like our parents generation.

Post # 10
Member
366 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

I thought that the statement “Women in red states tend to have their first children earlier than women in blue states. A 23-year-old mom is more likely to come up with something out of the ordinary than one who is 33.” Is probably pretty on the mark. Or at least is it more me. I know that as I’ve aged the “fun” names of the past start to seem a little silly to me.

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