(Closed) Baby sleep training options/opinions

posted 5 years ago in Parenting
  • poll: Did you sleep train your baby?
    No, I had an angel baby that slept through the night on their own : (9 votes)
    27 %
    No, because I didn't want to : (4 votes)
    12 %
    Yes, and I'm glad I did : (14 votes)
    42 %
    I tried sleep training but I didn't like it or it didn't work : (3 votes)
    9 %
    I love being exhausted! The mood swings are fun and I look good with circles under my eyes. : (3 votes)
    9 %
  • Post # 2
    Member
    7430 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2013

    So far, sleep training hasn’t worked for us. Dear Daughter is 14 months and we bedshare. She has never been a good sleeper since she was born. She just started what I would consider “sleeping through the night” after she turned 13 months. 

    I have tried everything, including CIO, and she doesn’t respond to any of it. She just cries harder and longer. I’m considering just having her transition to a mattress on the floor (montessori style) by the time she is 2.

    I just keep telling myself that I will miss this someday!

    Post # 4
    Member
    2554 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: June 2012

    Apparently,  between 6-8 months old, they are fully capable of sleeping through the night and getting all their calories during the day. I wanted to wait till the older end of that scale until I tried anything just for my own comfort so I started night weaning at 8 months.

    I’m going from what I read on Troublesome Tots (great baby sleep site) which involves a pretty long process of getting your baby to sleep, but more bearable than just letting your baby cry (I had a little crying, but nothing more than a few minutes). Whatever your beliefs on sleep training, nobody likes to hear their LO cry. It sucks. I won’t explain it here (just Google Troublesome Tots night weaning) but it involves slowly cutting back the time your LO nurses or drinks from the bottle, little by little. So far I’ve cut out her first feed as of a week ago (which was between 11:30pm-1:00am usually) and has been sleeping through to her next feed which is normally around 3am. That’s my next weaning project, as soon as this round of teething calms down!

    Post # 5
    Member
    2425 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: July 2015

    My son is almost 9 months. He sleeps all right. He just wont let me sleep. Everytime I put him down after he fall asleep in his pack and play in our bedroom he wakes up. Most of them time he doesn’t want milk he just wants to sleep on mommy. I feel like I have less sleep now than when he was a newborn.

    Post # 6
    Member
    6436 posts
    Bee Keeper

    MrsAKSkier:  Our daughter slept with us the first couple of months, some it was I couldn’t put her down and the other was I couldn’t put her down or she’d wake up.  The first few times it was an accident, she fell asleep in the boppy in between my legs.  Other times she fell asleep in our arms.  But as we got more sleep deprived, we just didn’t want to wait until she fell asleep to try moving her into her pack n play.  So she started sleeping with us.  She usually sleep on my side with a pillow under the mattress to prevent her from rolling out.  And it is surprising how light of a sleeper I became with her in the bed.  I don’t know if it was the comfort of being securely held by me, or she just felt safe, but she started sleeping through the night very quickly.  Eventually we slowly trained her out of sleeping with us.

    She moved into the pack n play for naps and bed time at about 3 months.  She stayed in the pack n play until she was about 8 months old.  Most of that was my insistence.  I think my husband wanted her out at 6 months (he wanted her in her own room in the crib.)

    we found playing with her, such as having her move around to get things helped.  If she wanted a toy she had to crawl to get it.  We tried to wear her out a lot before she went to bed.  Eating right before helped as well.  But I think some babies are just into sleeping at night easily and others aren’t.  I don’t think there is a right or wrong method to it.

    Post # 7
    Member
    1488 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    MrsAKSkier:  I sleep trained (CIO), with check ins etc at around 5 months. It worked great for us. Baby is 15 months and has slept through the night more or less since then except for the occasional sleep regression, sickness etc. He goes to sleep soundly and stays asleep and naps well. Our bond hasn’t suffered from that week or so of sleep training that I can tell (to respond to those who shame moms for doing this). 

    I do think that CIO takes longer the older they get, which makes it harder for both mom and baby

    Post # 8
    Member
    217 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: April 2011

    My son woke up several times a night to eat for the first 6 months.  Then at his 6 mo doctor appt, the doctor told me he’s old enough to not need to eat during the night; don’t feed him when he wakes up, and soon he’ll sleep through.  So when he would wake up during the night, we’d go in and put the paci in his mouth and rub his back, but not pick him up from the crib.  Within a month, he was definitely sleeping longer stretches, sometimes through the night.  It developed into him waking up crying about once a night, I’d go give him the paci, and walk right back out of the room… so I was back in my bed within 30 seconds.  He has definitely learned to comfort himself back to sleep, and if he can find the paci himself (meaning he didn’t knock it out on the floor), we hardly ever have to go in anymore.  The paci and lovey definitely help him. 

    Post # 9
    Member
    217 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: April 2011

    One other thing i’ll mention is that I learned to distinguish between different cries.  I read that the staccato cry is baby’s way of soothing himself.  So when i heard him crying with shorter cries instead of the long drawn out wails, we give it longer before going in, and most of the time he’ll get himself back to sleep in a few minutes.  Although we were letting him cry, I don’t really consider that CIO… just soothing himself back to sleep when I was pretty confident he could do it. But I didn’t get that tip til he was 9-10 months; i’m not sure if it would be helpful earlier. 

    Post # 10
    Member
    7430 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2013

    MrsAKSkier:  She doesn’t want to sleep alone, and I don’t blame her since she’s never done it! She’s actually sleeping really well right now, which means I’m finally getting better sleep too. She used to always wake up throughout the night in bed with me and root around to Boyfriend or Best Friend back to sleep. That would wake me up. Then I started being able to give her a paci instead to get her to fall asleep. Now as of 13 months, she’s completely dropped her middle of the night bottle (most nights), and she can wake up and fall back to sleep on her own without a paci. She will still feel to make sure I’m there, but that’s basically it.

    I’ve never let her get to the point of throwing up from CIO, but I’m sure she would get there. She doesn’t give up. She can be exhausted and will STILL be standing up in her crib screaming crying. She does start to get clumsy and will bump her head into the crib. I just can’t let her hurt herself like that. If she ever does fall asleep from CIO, it’s only for about 30 mins, and then she’s even more upset when she wakes up and she becomes super clingy. I’ve read that for some babies, CIO just makes things worse, and I believe she’s one of them. 

    Post # 11
    Member
    1039 posts
    Bumble bee

    We really had to sleep train. Not only were we not getting sleep, but our daughter wasnt getting any sleep either. However I will note that her sleep patterns changed and she was able to go for longer and longer stretches one we started cereal/pureed foods. But because she didn’t have the skills to self-soothe, they were inconsistent. So we started sleep training.

    Has your son started cereal/pureed? I know some people wait until 6mos or later, but I wonder if that would make any difference? I don’t think we used CIO much… there were times we’d leave her to “fuss” in her crib, but every baby is different. She just never needed us to get that far with her? We also used a vibrating mattress for her and that was a godsend to get her to go into a deep sleep plus a noise machine. I don’t know if anything I’m suggesting would actually help but I just wanted to give you some things we tried that worked for us that weren’t CIO. If you’ve used these, sorry I couldn’t help you further. I wish I could though. I know how miserable it is to not get sleep!

    Post # 12
    Member
    11744 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: November 1999

    we don’t sleep train because we aren’t comfortable with it For a few reasons, mainly because infant needs change so much in the first year with constant growth spurts and developmental changes that just because she didn’t need to eat at night last week doesn’t mean she isn’t hungry this week. That coupled with her inability to communicate with words means we respond to her cries all night.

    Dear Daughter is 11 months and has sttn (7-7) for on week (last week). She’s back to 1 MoTN feeding again. She has always been a decent sleeper (except 4-6 months was brutal!) she eats tons of solids and is great putting herself to sleep, so when she wakes at night I am confident it’s because she’s hungry or needs some Snuggles!

    I don’t believe that nighttime parenting will create bad habits and think sleep is develomental and she will get there when she is ready. It’s incredibly common for night wakings in the first few years of life. It’s exhausting but we survive with coffee, going to bed earlier and my husband always lets me sleep in on weekends when I need it since I do all MoTN feedings (Ebf). With that said, sleep training is a very personal decision that people need to do what’s right for their baby and family. Hang in there, before you know it you will be having to drag them out of bed in the morning!

    Post # 13
    Member
    149 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: March 2015 - Barn Restaurant

    We sleep trained my daughter at about a year old and it was the best thing I have done for her and us. I was reluctant of course because who wants to hear their baby cry but decided to try it. The first night we let her cry (listening in to make sure it wasn’t too painful of a cry, by then i could tell between her cries) and had to go in once to calm her down. She cried the first night for about 15 minutes before falling asleep. I of course felt horrible. She also woke up every night at 2am and I would rush to her aid ( habit with breastfeeding). We also stopped that at the same time…she cried for about 5 minutes for that. The following night she only cried for about 8 minutes till she fell asleep on her own and slept through the night. Third night 3 minutes. From then on she has been the BEST sleeper ever, prefers her crib…and even sleeps in late sometimes. I honestly do not feel that it has hurt our bond or that she has felt abandoned. In the sleep training phase and every other thing in her life I have comforted her when she needed me and she knows I am always there. I doubt she even remembers those 3 nights. She always gets a great night sleep and naps perfectly, sometimes with a smile of joy to snuggle in her bed (after snuggles with mom and dad and story time of course). 

    I know everyone is different so I say do what works for you and your baby! 🙂

    Post # 15
    Member
    1039 posts
    Bumble bee

    MrsAKSkier:  The food did make a difference, but not right away. It took about 2 weeks and then it was like this pattern of sleep, eat, play emerged all on its own. She slept longer, and was ready to self regulate and soothe herself a bit more. But that might just be her. We did follow a lot of the sleep training patterns, and I can tell you that I think I only had to let her CIO I think once? Maybe twice?

    Also here is the Munchkin Lulla-Vibe. It really saved us. She would wake up and I would go in, put her pacifier back in and then turn on the Lulla-Vibe. And she was OUT.

    http://www.diapers.com/p/munchkin-lulla-vibe-vibrating-mattress-pad-785200?site=CA&utm_source=adcenter&utm_medium=cpc_D&utm_term=MC-573&utm_campaign=bingproductads&CA_6C15C=1841824458

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