(Closed) Be Honest – How much did the GRE count towards your acceptance?

posted 6 years ago in College
Post # 3
Member
2725 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

It really depends on your program. If you have been out of school for a bit and working in the field that can sometimes affect it.

My grad program (Master of Social Work) traditionally doesn’t require the GRE and there are several people who came back to school after working for a bit. Look at the schools you will be applying to because the website will usually tell you the requirements. OR call the program and talk to them about it. Sometimes there are grad programs specifically designed for professionals so that you can work and get grad school done. My program has three cohorts day, night and part-time to accomodate all of the different needs. 

 

 

Post # 4
Member
2559 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Rumor around my program is just that you need a certain cutoff, ie a 1200 or so, so they don’t throw out your app on sight. Anythig above the cutoff seems to be “extra” good but not especially helpful.

Post # 5
Member
2651 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

It depends on how strong your resume is. Itotally bombed the math portion like I Olny did better than 10 perecent of the people that took it. But I had a really strong verbal score.(better than 98)my gap is a 2.8

Do you have any voulenteer work? 

Sent from iPhone

Post # 5
Member
4352 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@soyjoy222:  It varies a lot based on the program and the school. (I’ve taken the GRE but I have not applied to school yet bc I’m doing a gap year.) The good news is the math is way more “learnable” than the verbal. Buy one of the kaplan books, and start working your way through it. Its 20-30 bucks, and has a million tips and problems. Kaplan also lets you take the test for free online (though if you try to take it more than once its useless because they offer the same version every time). If you take the free test online they give you a discount code to apply to one of their courses afterwards.

Post # 6
Member
95 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

As other bees have said, it depends on your program and the school you are looking to get into. Some schools rely heavily on the GRE scores, while some use it more as a very rough screening tool to sort through the applicants to the program. 

Another thing to consider is what program you are going into. If you are going into say an english based field, schools tend to be more lenient with low math score and more focused on higher verbal scores (because math isnt the focus of the program). The opposite is true with math based fields like engineering. 

Post # 8
Member
1446 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

My program (MA in Political Science) told me I needed at least a 1200 to be considered for funding. Just to get in, I imagine it could be quite a bit lower. I think the GRE for some programs is just something that needs to be checked off the application checklist; your score is just one thing of many they take into account. A bad score can be overlooked if you have awesome recs or a great GPA.

I spoke with a professor who told me it just depends who is on the admissions committee. He said he himself gave no weight to the GRE-some people are just bad test takers. He said another notorious professor in the department had a GRE score in mind and even if your app is perfect in every way except the GRE score is just a little too low, your app gets thrown out.

For my Fiance, he’s applying to math Phd programs and suprisingly, they give little weight to the GRE. They know the math on the GRE is crap we haven’t used since high school and so they don’t see it as a reflection of a Phd applicant’s math ability. I guess what I’m trying to say is there are a ton of variables. Study as much as you can-I improved my score, no joke, 700 points from my diagnostic test before I started studying till the real thing.

Post # 9
Member
2725 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

@soyjoy222:  since you have your BSW you need to get your MSW! I’m telling you it is so much more versatile than doing a “therapy program.” Do the MSW with the clinical track. That’s what I’m doing. You can get hired to do therapy but the Marriage and Family part will come into your practicum or the agency you choose to work at. I am almost done with my program and I hope to get hired at my field site (it’s in the medical field) because A it pays well and B the supervisor has his LCSW so I can get supervision hours. 

The reality of the field is that agencies that do therapy are hiring a lot of LCSW because they can usually bill medicare. Also, many agencies do not just have one client population so you are expected to know all of the different theories and be compentent with all of those populations. It is better to be general now and focus later by going to conferences and different trainings. 

Also, if you have been working in the field then you should take the LSW exam. You may want to check your state’s requirements but I know in IL it is 3 years with a BSW or immediately after getting your MSW. Then after two years of supervision with you MSW you can get your LCSW-that’s what will put you ahead. 

In my experience, when I was applying to grad school none of the schools were requiring the GRE not even Washington University which is one of the top SW programs. Depending on how long you have been out of school you can do the advanced standing and get your MSW in a year (that’s what I’m doing).

The job market sucks right now and if you can’t get a job in therapy right away you can get a job in any social services agency with a MSW over the  other disciplines. 

I’m not saying MSW is the only way to go but if you have a BSW it is a better option.

Post # 11
Member
3220 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

The GRE isn’t beneficial for business– business graduate schools have the GMAT.  The GRE is to ascertain that you have a knowledge of math and verbal skills that are taught at most 4 year universities.  It’s a way to “level” the playing field, though most programs don’t take a lot of stock into it, as long as you don’t totally bomb it.  

Your program will want clear research interests and strong writing samples– while you may not need as much research experience as PhD programs, they want to know you’re going to do well in your program and how you may be a better fit that another student.  Definitely write your personal statement different for each school– you need to tell them why their professors will be the best for you, why you’ll do great there, etc. 

As sad as it sounds, these programs that are less tailored to individual research (as compared to say an MA in the Humanities like English or Anthropology) so they rely a lot more on raw numbers because all of the applicants are pretty similar. 

I’d email their Admissions or the graduate coordinator if you have a school in mind. Making contacts is really helpful.

Post # 12
Member
3220 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

Also just realized you’re looking at going in the Fall.  You’re going to have to take the GRE like yesterday? Most people use the October GRE as the cut-off for admissions for the following Fall– just because any other date you won’t get your scores back in time to apply.

MA programs do have later application dates, but even those with rolling admissions tend to fill up pretty quickly. (And I’m not sure I’d personally want to go to one that would just accept anyone who was willing to pay them a buck…)  You’re going to have to have GRE scores when you apply– which won’t be til two months after you take it. 

Post # 13
Member
231 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@soyjoy222:  For my program (MA in Communications) there was a certain number you needed for each section and an overall number but I felt like it was definitely attainable. (I think it was 1100 overall and no less than 500 on either section). In my opinion I bombed the math section (got around the 38th%) but my writing and verbal scores were outstanding. I exceeded the basic requirements and I think it helped that the parts I did extremely well on were ones that mattered for my program.

Good luck! Another thing, not sure if you have a Half Price Books near you (it’s a used bookstore in my area, not sure if it’s national) they have a whole section of test books. I got all my GRE study materials there (flashcards and a practice book).

Post # 14
Member
2299 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

It really depends. Some Universities have a minimum requirement for each section and others it depends on what dept. you’re applying for. For example, my dh is going into engineering so if they look at his scores and see that he did really crappy on the math portion, but good on the others they probably wouldn’t accept him. In his case he did very well in the math section and pretty good on everything else he probably doesn’t have to worry.

Edit: My dh had to take the GRE last summer to be considered for Fall 2012. Do they have late testing? It usually takes a good 3 months to get your scores back.

Post # 15
Member
10367 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

Depends on the school. At MIT, where I went to grad school, the GRE is a really big deal. It’s weighted about equally with GPA and previous research experience.

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