(Closed) Becoming an egg donor?

posted 6 years ago in Adoption & Surrogacy
Post # 16
Member
1077 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

My Round 1 was in California where there are plenty of minority donors, for Round 2 I went to Nevada where donors were getting $3k instead of the $10k they were getting in California.

Post # 17
Member
1263 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

    

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 8 months ago by LeonardLady.
Post # 18
Member
7382 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

Asthma surprised me!  It’s not a genetic condition, just has a hereditary component.

Post # 19
Member
1263 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

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FutureMrsJohnson_:  I am a four time egg donor… and an asthmatic! So I’m not sure why the other bee was turned away… maybe it was a different reason? Definitely do tons of research, and make sure your SO/FI/DH is comfortable with the decision to do this.

The application process takes a long time… up to 6 months. There are tons of forms and genetic testing, blood and urine testing, legal documents, psychologist visits, TONS  of stuff. Heck, you could go through all of that and then they could still deny you. Anyways, the injections were not a problem for me. They go two inches over from your bellybutton then two inches down, and the needles are so small they barely hurt. The retrieval was fine as well. They put you under anesthesia and it takes maybe 30 minutes tops. I was always awake within minutes if completing the procedure, and ready to roll right away.

The day after my first donation, I spent 8 hours at a water park! My second donation, I walked all around the city and then had Ruths Chris Steakhouse for dinner the SAME evening as my donation. They always gave me vicodin (or something of the like) to take as needed afterwards… but I never had to use them… not once. Being available three days is not really doable. Once you start the shots, you need to be available every single day to go in so they can monitor the growth of the follicles and do bloodwork (they prefer early mornings… not lunch break visits). Also, they can not tell you thr exact day of the donation (bc it just depends on how long it takes for your eggs to reach the proper maturation). 

Good luck, and feel free to message me with any questions or concerns!

Post # 20
Member
1263 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

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serotonin:  Hey, that’s my thread! 🙂 

Post # 21
Member
639 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2016

There are a ton of risks associated with these drugs like increased stroke risks. Please throughly investigate these risks and talk to your primary care doctor for a neutral unbiased opinion. These companies can be a bit fly by night.

Post # 22
Member
411 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

Anyone else get a lot of sidebar ads to the effect of “graduates of [college]! Make $20,000 by donating an egg!”? It’s a lot of money, but also seems like it can go pretty terribly.

Post # 23
Member
44 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Obviously lots of people have had positive donation experiences. There are risks and the industry isn’t very well regulated. I agree with previous posters, talk to your own primary care physician about risks etc. The clinics interests will be with the recipient not with you. Make sure you understand the side effects and interactions of the drugs you will have to take for your health. My sister had a fatal reaction to Lupron 10 years ago when she was attempting to become an egg donor. 

Post # 24
Member
64 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

I have not only donated eggs, but was actually a surrogate for my best friend.  He never found a wife and wanted children, so I was happy to do that for him.  He’s a really great father to his son.  Call me weird but it was a wonderful experience with no regrets.

Post # 25
Member
33 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2016

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liz42:  Wouldn’t this mean that you are his mother?  Does he call you mom?

Post # 26
Member
440 posts
Helper bee

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LeonardLady:  How long of a period of time do you need to be available every day for?  You mention “once you start the shots,” but I’m curious how long it is between when you start the shots and when your eggs are ready.

Post # 27
Member
8674 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2016

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fiona1992:  I assume the egg wasn’t hers but rather one the father picked from a donor?

Post # 28
Member
64 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

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amanda1988:  The egg was indeed mine….

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fiona1992:  ….so yes, I am his biological mother.  But no, he does not call me mom.  He calls me Aunt Liz and I refer to him as my nephew.

Post # 29
Member
328 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

 

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liz42:  I’m very curious. How can you handle/compartmentalize that? I think egg donation is great but I couldn’t do it. I’ve been very intrigued by the mindset of those that have gone through with it. 

Post # 30
Member
64 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

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mshoneybeespgbuzz:  It does get emotionally complicated for some people and for those people I don’t reccomend doing it.  It didn’t for me.  All I saw was that I was helping my best friend become a father and nothing more.

Now I’m sure some of you might be curious, so I’ll say this was while Fiance and I were broken up.  My best friend and I did NOT have sex; we conceived via a vial.  There was little disruption to my job (I’m a psychologist and I’m sitting down most of the time anyway).  All I asked of him was three things: that he would cover my medical bills, that he would help me arrange for a waterbirth (it really reduced the pain!), and that he would be there to support me during labor.  He did all that.  

Looking back, it was a positive experience and I would do it again for him, no questions asked.

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