(Closed) BED BUGS :(

posted 7 years ago in Home
Post # 32
Member
6375 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

Maybe try this: “We used to have bedbugs in our apartment and after requesting professionals to clean it up, it didn’t work and the bedbug appeared again after 2-3 weeks.<br /><br />We did some more research and were told by our family members that one should put hot water. We decided to try this by using electric kettle, boil the water and pour it on the edges of the bed and then wipe it immediately. First time we did it, we saw bedbugs running around. We continued this atleast twice a week and then once a week for a small period of time. After pouring the water on the edges, we used to apply insecticide powder for bed bugs. <br /><br />Doing this for 2-3 months and now we don’t have any bed bugs in our house and its been around 6-7 months we have enjoyed sleep again.”

Source: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/bed-bugs/Pages/Introduction.aspx

Post # 33
Member
546 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2013 - Mansion House at the MD Zoo

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sleepyhead22:  We’ve always emptied the vacuum and taken the trash bag directly to the dumpster or trash chute. You should be ok. Just don’t let them sit in your vacuum in case they get out. And re wooden furniture like your kitchen table–the exterminator can spray the cracks and joints just in case. They really have no motivation to go into your kitchen unless you start sleeping in there but just in case. Ditto with CD cases and stuff. I’d recommend focusing your attention on soft surfaces. ANother tip: if it’s hot enough there (summer temps), you can leave your car in the sun with the windows rolled up and the inside of your car should get hot enough to kill anything that might be in it. So you could put CDs and stuff in your car if you’re really worried. I wouldn’t worry about them really, but it might ease your mind and take less effort than spraying and stuff.

I’m with PPs, tell your neighbors. The bugs will probably migrate to them, and they’ll need to spray those apartments too so they either don’t go into them or die if they do. The best case scenario (sorry, because this sucks for you) is to have your neighbors do a spray prophylactically the same time as they spray your apartment. The bugs won’t have anywhere to go so they’ll be stuck in your apartment with the poison.

Post # 34
Member
63 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2014 - alder manor

 

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sleepyhead22:  Oh I feel your pain. I had bedbugs twice, in the same apartment. Getting rid of them, is something that you really have to be 100% committed to. Take time off work if you have to.

The first time I had them, I had my then landlord exterminate towards the end of the summer. At that time, I washed and dried everything I owned. I sprayed / washed all my furniture with 90% alcohol. Winter came and went.  When I was preparing for summer time the following spring, taking out summer clothes etc., they returned. I guess they were living in my storage bin amoungst my clothes. They can live for up to 12 months without feeding.

The second time, I had my landlord exterminate the entire apartment for the second time. Again, I washed everything I owned. Lived out of garbage bags as I wanted to keep everything air tight and avoid contamination again. Washed everything down with Alcohol, even took the furniture apart, so I could spray all the little corners, and holes with the Alocohol.

The exterminator came back after 30 days for another service, just a routine follow up. I still thought I had them, and had the place exterminated AGAIN! I even had the guy bring his special dog, who could sniff them out. I ended up having to throw away some furniture because the dog seemed to think they were still in there.

I know how you feel. It really is one of the most invasive, disturbing infestations you could get. Breathe. You and your man, have to commit to getting rid of them. Every few days, spray your furnture with alocohol, including your carpets, and any curtains etc. You’ll get through this, but you have to go hell for leather and do it all at once.

 

Post # 35
Member
104 posts
Blushing bee

I went through bed bug ordeal about 4 years ago and I know several cases, because I live in NYC. At first, I thought it was allergies, so they were basically biting me for like 3 weeks before I knew they were the cause. πŸ˜› But anyway, I was so freaked out and my mom singlehandedly got rid of them. Mattresses got thrown away. Clothing was not thrown away. She sealed it all up in plastic casing. After a few months, (I had no courage to touch that), she opened it for me and yes there were 2 or 3 dead ones found. But they were dead. Probably suffocated. As for books, they get sealed up too because they go into the binding. They like fabric, wood, and paper. They don’t crawl on metal. So a bed with a metal frame works. Also if you have carpet and a bad infestation, it may be a good idea to pull it up. But I do know someone that got rid of them without having to do that. He basically, just encased everything as well. Bed bugs are not microscopic, if you just keep checking your clothing,  you won’t be spreading it. It’ll be okay! πŸ™‚

Post # 36
Member
2769 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

Hugs! They can be got rid of, I had them and it was horrible (again, due to another apartment in the building). You have gotten some good advice, and some bad but well intentioned advice.

 

a couple of things: 1) contact your local health inspector. Get them to put pressure on your landlord. Feel free to put flyers on the doors of your neighbours and the people upstairs – if you underneath the infestation got bugs, the next door neighbours are 3x as likely to be affected as you are. Sometimes they can also help you with heat units etc.

2) fumigation just drives bed bugs into the walls/other apartments/rooms. The spray is cheaper and more effective at killing them. It needs to be done two or three times, two weeks apart due to the egg hatching cycle. 

3) the climb ups are good, but flimsy. You may need plywood under each leg to support them.

4) a lot of things that can’t normally be washed on high can be put dry into a dryer. I’m not sure if you are washing and drying or just drying, but that can cut the expense.

5) Try isopropyl alcohol. I worked at a place that collected insect samples when I had my bug outbreak, that is what we used to kill samples. I tried it on a bed bug I caught and it worked. Generously spray into your shoes, furniture made of wood, etc. (test to make sure you don’t destroy finishes – but do you care about that if you have bugs?) seal it up in plastic and duct tape if possible, and then redo it in 14 weeks (the eggs are tough little buggers).

6) cold is not a 100% effective killer unless you hit minus 20 for like 10-14 days straight – no hitting above it for an hour in the hottest part of the day. Long term exposure will cumulate, but even in cold climates that is hard to do.

7) there are a lot of insulated parts of your car that bugs can get to, the engine is hot, etc. bag everything in your car. Brush yourself off before getting in or out.

8) objects that can’t be treated can be sealed for 18-24 months. Bed bugs can survive longer than a year with no blood meal.

 

Post # 37
Member
7 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I discovered my first bed bug last Saturday night after months of bites, but no sign of the insects. Of course DH wasn’t getting the bites himself and thought I had another skin issue until the moment of discovering the bed bug on my pajama t-shirt at 2:30AM after itching my neck all night. We trapped it on a piece of clear packing tape to observe that it was in fact a bed bug.

Our first step was calling around different pest control companies today and trying to get an inspector to come out. Considering it took several months to see just one bug, we aren’t really sure how big the infestation is, which is why we aren’t treating immediately.

The company I chose had a reasonable inspection price and agreed that it’d be best to determine the size of the problem first. Their treatment process is once a week for three weeks and a guarantee to come out again (free of charge) if any bites occur within 30 days after the third treatment. Considering I am 4 months pregnant, I’m sure I’ll see bites within that time period if the problem is unresolved. The bed bugs are more attracted to warmer body temperatures and the inceased amount of carbon dioxide pregnant women emit.<br />

It’s sad that it came to having to find a bug before convincing DH that we may potentially have bed bugs. Oh well. I cannot totally blame him and I should’ve just called sooner regardless of what he believed. After all, it’s my home, too, and why shouldn’t I be comfortable sleeping?

Post # 38
Member
200 posts
Helper bee

Ok what does your lease say in regards to who is responsible for for extermination?  As a prop manager we are trained to not only treat the affected unit but EVERY touching unit otherwise you are just moving the issue.  In the long run the building will be paying more money to fix it.  There is no reason why you cannot let neighbors know about this and if I were you I would post it onto Yelp and Apartmentratings.com if they are on there. This is unacceptable.  The way that they and the extermination company handled this is terrible.  Any decent exterminator would know this so it frightens me that they are just starting to treat you apartment.  A good exterminator would have refused to do the work if the landlord said to just do the one unit.  Call the health inspector and let them know what is going on.  Unfortunately moving is not an option unless you are willing to part with all of your major furniture.  Best of luck and PM me if you need further help!

Post # 39
Member
2769 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

There is also a bed bug registry – post it up everywhere!

Post # 41
Member
63 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2014 - alder manor

 

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sleepyhead22:  Yes, I washed (even though not necessary) and dried all of my clothes for about an hour. I did clean the storage bins with alcohol, but evidently not thorughly enough. When I got them for the second time, I went absolutely over the top crazy with the alcohol, everytime I even thought about it, I’d spray for twenty minutes, even for months after. Everytime I changed my bed sheets I would spray the mattress with the Alcohol, before redressing the bed. I found it hard to sleep for a long time around that period, and even still, its the first thought when I get on the subway everyday, bothers me when in movie theatres or buses. I always pay attention to who I’m sitting beside, where I’m sitting – I don’t sit on subway seats that have cracks etc., it totally changed the way I think. A little scared for life πŸ™

 

Post # 42
Member
404 posts
Helper bee

You’re getting great advice here on how to handle the bedbugs in your apartment, so my advice may or may not pertain to you: please check your local health ordinances and your tenant rights. Because your landlord knew there were bedbugs in the building, did not inform you, and is not informing the other tenants, they may be in violation of the law.

We were in the exact same situation. Multi-unit building, people upstairs had the bugs, landlord knew and was kicking them out, and once the people moved, so did the bugs — right into our apartment! We had just renewed the lease on our place so we had known this landlord for years. Once we started making a big fuss about them handling the problem, the landlord starting telling the other residents that WE were responsible for bringing in the bugs! Fortunately I had everything documented, including statements from the upstairs tenants that they did have bedbugs and the landlord did know, and I contacted the health department. Our rental code states that landlords cannot permit their buildings to become pest-infested, which this building was, infested with bedbugs! We ended up getting our rent check back for that month and our security deposit back in full, and broke the lease with no penalty.

It was a pain the butt, but please take note: bedbugs cannot be treated unit-by-unit. The landlord needs to treat all the units in the immediate vicinity. There could be other tenants who have bedbugs who have not disclosed to the landlord and are not as informed as you are, and are treating with foggers and bug bombs that will only make things worse. Please make sure you know all your rights!

  • This reply was modified 7 years, 2 months ago by FossilLady.
Post # 43
Member
2769 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

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sleepyhead22:  I have good/bad news for you – I don’t constantly worry about it anymore, but on the other hand I still have tape sticky-side out around my bedposts, almost three years later. New clothes are tied airtight into their bags and opened up in the dryer where they run for about 40 minutes before I even wash them. I don’t usually think about bugs anymore, but I still check ever damn piece of lint that ends up in the apartment. 

 

About two weeks after seeing the last living one in the apartment I could get to sleep a bit easier. I moved out after a month and a half/two treatments, and checked (even just a little) for about six months at least every two days before I felt like I was safe. When I went back to do a final scrub of the apartment so they had no reason to keep my deposit, I found a female adult bedbug in the elevator, in the middle of the day. I am SOOO GLAD I left. 

Post # 44
Member
7 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I PM’d my experience with the inspector to sleepyhead22, but figured I’d post it here as well.

The inspector was really friendly and not salesperson-y in anyway. That may sound like a weird concern, but I didn’t want to feel ”played” by hiring some dishonest sleazebag. We have a small two bedroom two bath condo that we own so it’s our responsibility for treating any and all issues. Our bedroom is the only room people sleep in and it doesn’t share walls with any other units thankfully. The second bedroom will be for the newborn, but we haven’t even begun to work on the room.

I explained to him that I first saw bites late spring before pregnancy. Part of me suspected bed bugs, but we had no clue what to look for and thought they’d be adult size (easy to spot). The bites only occurred every two weeks so it wasn’t a huge bother. Upon becoming pregnant, the bites became more frequent and the past month has been the most severe. The inspector saw my arms and thought our entire place was going to be infested!

He began to canvas the bedroom, peeled the comforter off, sheets off, mattress pad off, and looked at the mattress with a magnifying glass. NOTHING. He then had me help pull the mattress off and set aside. NOTHING beneath it. Crazy, right? Our mattress is only one year old and has many layers to it, which can be unzipped. We opened the compartments that contain the memory foam and whatnot, but found NOTHING.

”Would you be surprised if I said I’m not finding anything?” I then showed him the glue traps by husband got from the exterminator who treats his work building and explained that my husband doesn’t see anything on them. He responded, ”well I have bad news… there’s nymphs on them.” So small and white that I couldn’t see them at a glance, which is probably how my husband looked as well.

The inspector then pulled up the ”box spring” and looked under the fitted bed skirting, which had black nymphs in each corner. He brought a non-toxic spray that kills on contact to ensure this breed would be killed by their treatments. Voila! They died. He did this in each corner then checked each screw hole in the bedframe, which had anything from nymphs to adults within them. Everything that was moving was no longer moving once sprayed even hours later when rechecking.

In his assessment, I asked how severe he thought the problem was to which he responded, ”you’re a 3 out of 10. I only say a 3 because they were in the screw holes. That’s a pain, but at least they were visible. Your mattress is untouched mostly because you have some super lazy bed bugs. They don’t want to work hard for food so the easiest route was via your bedframe. I doubt they’re many more places, but I’m not ruling out the couch just yet. I would recommend the treatment series for three weeks, keep setting up glue traps to keep those from feeding and as proof of their presence, and use this spray to kill them on contact when you see them.”

He sounded very optimistic, which made me relax a bit. I do not plan on getting rid of any furniture because he said it’s all treatable and because we purchased it all within the past year. It’s very possible that the bugs arrived with the bedframe, but we’ll never know!

Upon my husband’s return home from work, we threw out the bed skirt, vacuumed the area where he walked and around the bed for anything that may have fallen off, and then proceeded to manuever the mattress and box spring in order to spray more live bugs/eggs. By throwing out the skirting, the inspector said it would eliminate approzimately half of the bed infestation.

The extermination company is to call today or tomorrow morning to arrange for our first treatment. We are working hard to dry all of our fabric on high heat, place in totes and/or garbage bags. The lack of space to place everything is unfortunate and I know sleepyhead22 is dealing with the problem, too. Our garage is currently empty so the totes of winter clothes will be going in there for now. The inspector showed to what extent the closets should be cleared and he said the clothes could remain hanging in our walk-in closets, but the floor is to be cleared. All dressers must be emptied in our bedroom.

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