(Closed) Bees- is this a good deal? or too good to be true?

posted 6 years ago in Rings
Post # 17
Member
3682 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

It’s clarity enhanced and the cut is terrible.

Post # 18
Member
753 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

@ChellFish22: Here is a link to clarity enhanced diamonds, GIA will only give a report on drilled diamonds NOT filled. 

 http://www.goodoldgold.com/4Cs/Clarity/ClarityEnhancedDiamonds/

Personaly the reason that I would pass is the cut is only “good”. I’m ok with both J stones and SI2 clarity but only if it had an 3X or 000 grades. This diamond wont sparkle all that great with an “good” cut so the J color and SI2 claritys will be far more noticeable. 

 

I dont think you should pass on craigslist finds. Think of it this way, you have a diamond you paied $5000 for and your ex cheated/left/you all lost your jobs. You can get $1500 from a pawn broker/ “diamond buyer”, $2000 on E-bay or $2500 local on craigslist. There just isn’t a place to easily sell jewelry if you no longer want it for more then “gold weight”.

Yes there are scams and junk on the site, but if you find somthing you like at a price you like tell them to met you at the jeweller of your choice to have it checked out. 

Post # 19
Member
330 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 1994

I read from some where that GIA doesn’t grade “clarity enhanced” diamonds…I could be wrong? Maybe some expert bees can fill us in :))

I personally would not buy color/clarity enhanced diamonds.

Post # 20
Member
330 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 1994

@NEAM2014:  +1

Post # 21
Member
1768 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 1997

@ChellFish22:  it’s bogus, GIA will not grade clarity enhanced diamonds as they no longer consider them diamonds. (although other grading agencies will)

That being said, think it’s a great idea to buy used. You save a bundle. I remember reading you lost your ering. Sorry to hear.  I think buying a ring from a local Craigslist where you can meet the seller at a jewelry store and confirm what you are buying is a good plan!

Post # 22
Member
753 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

GIA WILL grade 

How does a GIA Diamond Grading Report help you know whether your diamond has been treated?

GIA does not issue grading reports for any diamond that has undergone a treatment process that’s considered nonpermanent or unstable, such as coating or fracture filling.

GIA will issue reports for diamonds that have been laser drilled or HPHT processed, prominently disclosing these treatments on the report. As a further precaution, GIA also laser-inscribes the girdles of diamonds it identifies to be HPHT processed.

 

http://gia4cs.gia.edu/en-us/lad-diamond-treatments.htm

 

Post # 23
Member
753 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

So yes it can be a GIA graded clarity enhanced or color enhanced diamond if it is laser drilled or HPHT to change the color. 

 

I think these are amazing ways to get a diamond cheaper if everything else about the diamond is right. BUt I would only buy one of these diamonds if it is GIA

Post # 24
Member
432 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2016

You get what you pay for. It is clarity enhanced so you’ll have to be careful of getting it repaired and tell jewelers if it’s fracture filled, since it could cause problems near certain temperatures. Also the table is really big, which may have reduced scintillation like others have mentioned. You really need to know the different angles to see if this is truly a quality cut diamond. Your choice, smaller and sparkly or larger with less pizzaz. Just make sure you know what you’re buying and know it won’t be an “investment” stone for resell in the future. 

 

http://www.pricescope.com/wiki/diamonds/diamond-table-size

 

Oh yeah, be SUPER careful with Craigslist. Boyfriend or Best Friend had ad up for his car, they wanted to give him a Cashier’s check for more than the car, and get cash back. Cashier’s checks can actually bounce and you would be out the money! Just beware, lots of scams (including following you home to rob merchandise back, etc) so if it sounds too good to be true, probably is.

 

 

 

Post # 25
Member
6441 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

In the vast majority of cases, a seller won’t take a loss on a sale, meaning that the item is worth less than what the seller is charging. Granted, deals sometimes, do happen, but it is exceedingly rare in diamonds. Add to that the fact that the cut on this stone is terrible; the table is immense. And it being an Si2 enhanced stone only makes things worse. I realize others differ, but I’d never buy a clarity enhanced stone. I don’t think this stone is “too good to be true”; it doesn’t look that good to begin with.

Post # 26
Member
2837 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

@ChellFish22:  It’s as simple as this:

 

This might be a real diamond….where else do you try and go to recover money from a no-longer-wanted diamond?  A pawn shop isn’t going to give you crap, a jewelry store won’t give you crap unless you’re upgrading…..there’s eBay (where you’re not selling locally) and craigslist.

I’m not saying you should buy and it and leave- no questions asked.  And the GIA report is so recent that- it depends on what the story is behind the diamond.  There’s likely an inscription, especially if it was just graded recently– so if this person has a GIA cert and is selling what they say they are, they’ll have no problem meeting you at a jewelry store where you can get it checked out real quick.

Although a jeweler won’t so an appraisal without getting paid (and likely an appointment), a gemologist should be willing to tell you if they specs and the GIA report generally match up with the diamond.

When we bought my diamond– it was purchased online (from a reputable dealer), but the gemscribe number is covered by the bezel, and we had it set by the place we purchased from.  So I look it to a jewelry store and had them check it out– t make sure it matched up since I’ll never see that inscription unless I unmount my diamond.  They were happy to do this, and the person who did it was a GIA cert. gemologist.

 

*I would like to note that I have read no replies to the original post when I wrote this because I don’t have my glasses with me LOL– so sorry if this has already been discussed.

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