(Closed) Bees suffering from bipolar…now I join the fold (Sorry LONG)

posted 5 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
163 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

double post

Post # 4
Member
163 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

@Jacqui90:  

I dont have experience with bipolar, but last year I was gang-raped and went through a major depressive episode, developed very severe PTSD and general anxiety disorder. I also had bulimia, which developed more into binge eating disorder and I gained about 20kgs.

 

I was at the point where I didn’t leave the house for weeks and was struggling with day to day tasks, I quit my job, and my relationship with my family was incredibly strained. 

 

After finding the courage to talk to my parents about it, they flipped out, demanded to have access to the police files and were incredibly nasty about my weight gain. They barely spoke about the rape, or asked how I was feeling, and focussed almost solely on my weight gain as the problem. It was ridiculous, but after speaking to them about it my mother broke down and explained that she didn’t know what to do, and wanted to help me control something in my life. All the intentions were good, but the execution was awful!

 

Also, after not giving my parents access to police reports etc they refused to believe that I had been raped. It was utterly ridiculous, so I totally understand that a family’s denial in a tough time makes everything so much worse!

 

You don’t need to be scared, I am here to talk if you want. πŸ™‚ And if your Fiance is helping you, provided you look after yourself as well (I went through a time of basically relying on mine to deal with my mental health issues) you will work through it and come out stronger.


Post # 6
Member
2654 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@Jacqui90:  ((Hugs)) Families can be something, eh? Take a deep breath and focus on the fact that what you are suffering from is treatable. Yes, you may be on medication for the rest of your life, but it will be a life under YOUR control as opposed to being controlled by BPD. Whenever I’m afraid, my Fiance always tells me, “It’s good to feel the fear. It means that you understand the situation and the stakes involved. You have every right to be afraid, but don’t let it control you.” I don’t know if it helps you, but it always comforts me.

 

When I was 19, I was diagnosed with MDD, and it sucked. My parents basically thought I just wasn’t trying hard enough to be happy. When I was 20, I spiraled down so low, and it led to a suicide attempt. Luckily, my then-boyfriend found me and got me to the hospital on time. I was released from the ER and brought directly to the psychiatric ward where I was given two choices: commit myself voluntarily or be committed against my will. I chose the former and was there for over a week. When I was released, my parents picked me up and brought me back to my apartment. They gave me a couple of house plants as a present, stayed with me for a couple of hours to make sure I was okay, and basically lectured me about letting the sad thoughts take over and working harder to think happy thoughts. Sure. Because it’s THAT simple. Wish I had thought of it. They haven’t really changed since then, but I’ve learned to accept it and never talk to them about my mental health. Hopefully, you reach a better place with your parents. It’s a great sign that your dad looked up the information and has been so supportive. Perhaps you can get them some literature to help them better understand. 

 

@ms-valentine:  Mother of God. I’m so very sorry that you experienced such a horrible crime against you. I’m so glad that your parents were able to be honest about their feelings and helplessness. It’s not easy to know that their daughter went through a terrible thing that they can’t fix. ((Hugs))

Post # 7
Member
163 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

@Jacqui90:  Such is life. πŸ™‚ It has strengthened my relationship with my partner and I try and see the positives. 

Let me know if you want any specific advice, I can’t really think of much to say except try and ignore your mother’s comments, and accept that they are coming from a place of love. 

Post # 10
Member
3691 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

I’m sorry your family isn’t being supportive.  I was diagnosed with depression when I was 20.  My dad tried to be supportive, but sucked at it.  My sister (who was a freshman in college and a psych major!) said depression is fake and all I had to do was tell my doctor I was tired all the time to get on drugs.  The bitch thought I was getting high on SSRIs.

I was diagnosed with GAD a couple of years ago, and I know now that I also had anxiety back when I had the depression.  The only person I talk to about it is my husband.  He always has my back, and my family is just useless as a support system. 

Post # 11
Member
7493 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2010

@ms-valentine:  

I don’t even know what to say to you.  So I will just say I am so sorry for everything you have been through compounded by your parents’ cruelty.  You are incredibly strong to be able to share your experiences here and reach out to offer support to the OP.

 

Jacqui90:  I have MDD, severe, GAD and panic disorder as my dxs from my psychiatrist.  My therapist suspects bipolar 2, but my psychiatrist doesn’t see it that way.  So I’m not sure who’s right tho the symptoms are a good fit.

 

As the others have said, BPD is very treatable with the right meds.  It may take some experimenting to get your meds right, but that is temporary.  Was it something of a relief to finally get your diagnosis and have things start to make sense?

 

Post # 12
Member
9142 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

@Jacqui90:  I’m sorry your family is being unsupportive but maybe they feel guilty in that bipolar is genetic?  It will probably take them a lot of time to understand and cope with your diagnosis.  Getting them books on the subject is a good idea; pamphlets are also a good idea because they are shorter and quicker to read.  Are there any support groups for families locally?

You on the other hand finally have a answer and a diagnosis.  Woo!  Now your psychiatrist can start treated you in line with your diagnosis.  Bipolar can be difficult to deal with but it is possible with counseling and usually some sort of medication.  Just bear in mind that if you go on medication it can take months or years to get the right combination and many people with bipolar do not like the way they feel on meds so they stop taking them.  Make a pact with yourself now to only start and stop meds with the assistance of your psychiatrist, regardless of how you feel, the dr gets the final yay or nay. 

@strawbabies:  Your sister is a b*tch and should actually pay attention to the classes in her major.  I hope she isn’t a counselor with that attitude!

Post # 14
Member
3691 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@beachbride1216:  She changed her major shortly after that to geology, in which she now has a master’s degree.  I’m glad she only works with rocks now, because I told her at the time that she was going to cause a patient to commit suicide.  Yes, she is a bitch, and we don’t speak to each other.  

Post # 16
Member
9142 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

@Jacqui90:  The depression and bipolar runs in mine too on my mother’s side.  I am also the lucky recipient of anxiety and panic attacks from my dad’s side.  My mom’s side recognizes the mental illness but vary in their ability to cope with it; many use substance abuse as treatment because they don’t want the stigma of psychiatric treatment.

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